New York Times Picks Up Story on Museum Tower’s Glare Roasting The Nasher Sculpture Center

The tweet from the New York Times twitter feed says it all.

The saga over Museum Tower has officially become a national news story. One can only wonder if this is the result of Nasher architect Renzo Piano making good on his threat to “make trouble” for the owners of the high-rise condo development?

No one quite knows what to do. The condo developer and museum officials are at loggerheads. Fingers are being pointed. Mr. Piano is furious. The developer’s architect is aggrieved. The mayor is involved. A former official in the George W. Bush administration has been asked to mediate.

Sounds like things are heating up (pun intended!). Stay tuned …

 

0 Comment

  • Candy,

    I love Dallas, particularly the Nasher (was a member while I lived there), the high-rise skyline, and your opinions. What is going to happen with this? Does anyone have the power to get the developer to change glass on the tower? Do enough people care?

  • Candy,

    I love Dallas, particularly the Nasher (was a member while I lived there), the high-rise skyline, and your opinions. What is going to happen with this? Does anyone have the power to get the developer to change glass on the tower? Do enough people care?

  • Hi Will, I just posted some reactions. Tom Luce is mediating a solution even as we speak. Have you seen this happen in California and what do you think the reaction would be there?

  • mm

    Hi Will, I just posted some reactions. Tom Luce is mediating a solution even as we speak. Have you seen this happen in California and what do you think the reaction would be there?

  • Candy,

    I am far north from Los Angeles so there is an activist group for everything. Meaning, every museum, every building, every high-rise gets a multi-year review by a variety of agencies and government or partial-government committees before any building can commence.

    To build in California takes five times as long for permitting and fifty times as much in permit fees compared to the great state of Texas.

    The good news is that one of those committees would have likely asked about this issue and maybe caught it. If not, 52 environmental groups and deep pocketed philanthropists who paid for the museum would have immediately filed an injunction against the building (Museum Tower in this case) halting construction until the issue was resolved.

    I wish I had a specific example that is comparable. I did, however, write a piece about the extreme environmentalists trying to keep the University from expanding at the expense of jobs (we still have 11-12% unemployment) over some acreage of forest (<100) the University already owns right next to tens of thousands of state forest.

    Keep us all informed on the progress and keep up the great work here at Candy's Dirt!

  • Candy,

    I am far north from Los Angeles so there is an activist group for everything. Meaning, every museum, every building, every high-rise gets a multi-year review by a variety of agencies and government or partial-government committees before any building can commence.

    To build in California takes five times as long for permitting and fifty times as much in permit fees compared to the great state of Texas.

    The good news is that one of those committees would have likely asked about this issue and maybe caught it. If not, 52 environmental groups and deep pocketed philanthropists who paid for the museum would have immediately filed an injunction against the building (Museum Tower in this case) halting construction until the issue was resolved.

    I wish I had a specific example that is comparable. I did, however, write a piece about the extreme environmentalists trying to keep the University from expanding at the expense of jobs (we still have 11-12% unemployment) over some acreage of forest (<100) the University already owns right next to tens of thousands of state forest.

    Keep us all informed on the progress and keep up the great work here at Candy's Dirt!