2849 Claudette Avenue is currently listed for $549,900 by Hans Stroble of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices PenFed Realty Texas.

Now here’s a Friday Five Hundred you don’t want to miss! Situated minutes from the Bishop Arts District, Kessler Park, and downtown Dallas sits this three-bedroom, two-bath charmer that definitely lives up to the hype. With a 1,584-square-foot interior bursting with curated designer details modeled after European minimalism and trendy boutique hotels, you’ll want to get a jump on this one.

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Kessler Park Colonial
This Kessler Park colonial is precisely the sort of home people dream of finding when they decide to move to the rolling hills of Oak Cliff. It embodies all of the original 1935 New England charms but has undergone an extensive remodel, which means no work for you!

Featured on the Oak Cliff Home Tour, it’s clear 1006 Lausanne Avenue has been not only well-loved for over 80 years, but also beautifully maintained and continually and carefully updated.

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Brettonwoods Home for Sale | CandysDirt.com

If you’d love a home on a little more land, but assumed you’d need a hefty budget to afford it, cast your eye to the Brettonwoods neighborhood in Oak Cliff. 

Our Thursday Three Hundred at 3123 Gladiolus Ln. sits on half an acre, a renovated and beautiful home near West Ledbetter Drive and South Westmoreland Road. It has three bedrooms, two bathrooms, two dining areas, and 2,033 square feet, built in 1962. And believe it or not, it is listed for $350,000.

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Recent developments surrounding the Golf Club of Dallas, formerly the Oak Cliff Golf Club, bring to mind a panel discussion at June’s National Association of Real Estate Editors confab.  Seems golf clubs are not as popular with the young as they are with their parents’ and grandparents’ generations.  There are several reasons for this, including shifting socialization patterns, negative perceptions of the game’s culture, and cost.

It seems that as society has picked the pockets of young people for everything from student debt to over-priced apartments, there’s simply less in the kitty for expensive pastimes like golf.  And golf is an expensive activity.  Aside from the stereotypically garish ensembles, it’s not difficult to drop a grand on a set of clubs, a couple of hundred on shoes, and upwards of $50 for every dozen balls. And that’s before you hit the links.

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Last night’s community meeting with Huffines Communities at the Golf Club of Dallas on Redbird Lane felt like a bad setup. The room was at capacity with literally hundreds more still standing in line, out to the middle of the parking lot, when the presentation began.

“I hope all these people are against the project” said one woman in front of me. Everyone seemed to be talking about how the proposed small lots and low price point were a bad fit for the neighborhood. It was a very diverse crowd – a cross-section of the diversity that people love about Oak Cliff, from very young to very old and all types and kinds of ethnicities of people. Even Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price was there.

When Donald Huffines — who is also a Texas state senator — got to the mic. he began by showing images of developments he’s built in his 30 years of experience. Water parks, waterfalls into lakes, Cape Cod-inspired town homes, and ‘no brick facades’ – so homeowners are able to paint their exteriors … Demonstrating in pictures what their website says about another project they planned, “This community will offer residents the signature Huffines Communities lifestyle along with traditional resort-style amenities, several highly regarded builders, and year-round resident activities.”

The neighbors didn’t want slick pictures of other places — they wanted to hear what was planned for their neighborhood. The presentation was cut short and the crowd got rowdy. Dallas City Council Member Casey Thomas did his best to calm the crowd. Eventually we heard, “There is no plan yet. We’re here tonight to hear what the neighborhood wants.” With over 500 people in a jam-packed audience that was a tall order. (more…)

 
When some people hear the words “family home” when describing a house, they automatically expect a beige yawn-fest with builder-grade carpet and a bonus room that will eventually be lousy with toys and a minefield of mismatched Legos. And truth be told, not every family wants to live in a house that feels boring, tired, and just another place for kids to scatter shoes and backpacks.
 
Lucky for you, Sam Saladino with David Griffin & Company has a listing in Kessler Park that combines family living and plenty of style. It’s a house for parents who like to host parties and for kids who beg off the occasional sleepover. It’s a split level with a split personality, and this Oak Cliff cutie is a shoo-in as High Caliber Home of the Week sponsored by Lisa Peters of Caliber Home Loans. If you are in the market for a family home that doesn’t look like a “family home,” look no further!

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If you’re dreaming of Frank Sinatra singing, “Fly Me To The Moon,” cocktails that are shaken — not stirred, and Palm Springs poolside lounging, we have your next home! Our Inwood National Bank House of the Week at 910 W. Colorado Blvd. is a flawless Oak Cliff midcentury modern that could easily be a location for any Rat Pack movie.

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If it’s Red, full steam ahead; if it’s Yellow, say “hello;” if it’s Blue, you might’ve missed your queue.

Last week, Seth Fowler wrote about a client of his looking for a home in the sub-$200,000 market close to his job in Bedford.  “Ted” had been on a roller coaster of 43 showings and 11 contract offers … still without a home eight months on and counting. In today’s Dallas, it’s a story that’s been accelerating since the housing market began recovering in 2013. While slacking in the upper end of the market, the entry level remains full steam ahead.

Also last week, Alex Macon posted on D Magazine’s Frontburner about the legacy of redlining and a new set of charts overlaying 1930s redline maps against the current racial makeup of Dallas (U.S. Census data).  It’s clear that the 30-year pox of redlining, from the 1930s until 1968, still infects the Dallas landscape (as it does nationwide in many previously redlined areas).

But what’s the reality? I’m going to find out.

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