candidates

Whether it’s city or school board candidates, politics play a big part in the health of Dallas — and therefore the health of the real estate market.

After the May 4 election, there were six races (five city and one Dallas ISD school board race) where none of the candidates reached the 50 percent threshold required to win outright, kicking off an extended election season that will culminate with a runoff election on June 8.

One such race was in District 14 race, where David Blewett blew past incumbent Philip Kingston in early voting and ended up with 47.63 percent of the vote to Kingston’s 40.38 percent by the end of the night.

We solicited questions from readers and voters to craft a comprehensive questionnaire for each individual race. Both Kingston and Blewett have answered our questionnaire, and some of their responses follow. Their full responses are at the end of this story. (more…)

emergency

Photo courtesy Flickr

From staff reports

It takes more than two years to sock away enough money to address a six-month emergency fund in the Dallas metro area, a new Bankrate.com report revealed.

The area ranks 15th hardest of the top 50 metros when it comes to building a six-month emergency savings fund. That fund would be able to pay for housing costs (mortgage or rent, insurance, property taxes) as well as living expenses like groceries, transportation, utilities, etc.

Factoring all that in, Dallas-area household can theoretically save up to $9,704 of its $56,671 annual take-home pay, Bankrate said, which means it would take 29 months to achieve the area’s average recommended emergency fund of $23,484, enough to cover these expenses for six months. (more…)

Panelists Corey Clothier (Mobility e3), Rod Schebesch (Stantec), Kelley Coyner (Mobility e3) and Tom Yardley (Stantec)

 
We’re starting to see the impact that self-driving, autonomous vehicles will have on real estate development. It corresponds, interestingly ,with the same trends we saw in the recent WalkUp Wake Up Call for DFW: these will be two major real-estate-driven boons to our local economy that will change the landscape of our cities over the next few decades.
 
If you’ve been following the autonomous vehicle conversation, you know there are LOTS of different companies working on AV technology with a variety of different applications, from long-haul platooning to neighborhood delivery robots and everything in between. Experts from Mobility e3 & Stantec broke down the real estate impacts of AVs at a panel discussion hosted by Munsch Hardt law firm.
 
Bottom line, the AV technology with the greatest impact on local real estate development will be the AVs adept at navigating high pedestrian densities. That is, once the novelty wears off and people stop jumping out, playing with, and laying in front of them, making for a very long and jerky ride. There are a few companies honing this technology for high-density, mixed-use areas where originations and destinations are within relatively close proximity. Navya is one. It’s a French company that built one of the first driverless vehicles and has been operating a driverless shuttle minibus in Las Vegas. They just delivered a public bus fleet to Oslo, Norway.
 
All but one of the prototype vehicles in use in the U.S. now are small vehicles carrying 4-8 passengers.

(more…)

populationTwo out of three of the metropolitan areas that had the largest population growth were in Texas, and three Texas metropolitan areas were in the top 10 nationally, new census figures revealed.

The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA topped the nation when it came to numeric population growth, the most recent Census Bureau data revealed Thursday, with a gain of 131,767 in 2018, or 1.8 percent.

Census officials attribute the growth to migration — both domestic and international migration — as well as natural increase (having more births than deaths). In fact, natural increase impacted DFW growth the most, while domestic migration was the largest source in Phoenix.

“One interesting trend we are seeing this year is that metro areas not among the most populous are ranked in the top 10 for population growth,” Sandra Johnson, a demographer in the Census Bureau’s Population Division, said in a statement. “Though no new metro areas moved into the top 10 largest areas, Phoenix, Seattle, Austin, and Orlando all experienced numeric increases in population since 2010, rivaling growth in areas with much larger populations. This trend is consistent with the overall growth we are seeing in the south and the west.” (more…)

Best Cities

Mansfield ranked No. 9 in a list of best cities for young families compiled by Apartment List (Photo courtesy City of Mansfield).

By Angelina Bader
Apartment List 

If you are looking for a family-friendly city to relocate to, look no further, since Apartment List has recently published a new ranking of the best cities for young families. So, finding a city where your family will thrive just got a little easier.

Fishers, Indiana, is in the first place overall out of 554 cities that are ranked in the study. Otherwise, the state of Texas dominates the Top 10, with the exception of San Ramon, California, which placed as #3. Santa Cruz, California, is last out of 552 cities, with an F as its overall grade, with the numbers not looking too promising. As of 2017, Santa Cruz had 6,284 crimes per 100,000 residence.

Photo courtesy Town of Flower Mound

Texas cities took four out of ten top spots in the ratings. Flower Mound, Cedar Park, League City, and Mansfield ranked #4, #7, #8, and #9 respectively, receiving A+ grades for family-friendliness. All of these towns are located not far from large Texas metropolitan areas — Houston, Dallas, and Austin. So, while your youngster is learning his numbers and ABC’s, you’ll be just a short drive away from career opportunities and booming tech hubs. (more…)

Dallas-Fort Worth

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Four Texas metros hit the U.S. News and World Report list of best places to live — and Dallas-Fort Worth was in the top 25. But how did the city fare in a study of diversity? And where do Millennials want to move?

We cover all this and more in this week’s roundup of real estate news. (more…)

The Deep Ellum district in downtown Dallas is home to a vibrant arts and entertainment scene. (Photo: Steve Rainwater via Creative Commons)

The January release of “The WalkUP Wake-Up Call: Dallas-Fort Worth” happened quietly, though the implications for investment are huge.

This is the largest study done on D-FW on the most profitable type of real estate in the nation. Walkable Urban Places (WalkUPs) are seeing higher property values, lower vacancy, and commanding higher rental rates. Even through the last recession, WalkUPs saw lower vacancy and quicker leasing rates than places designed in a primarily drivable sub-urban orientation.

Walkable Urban Places are also proving to be the most economically, socially, environmentally, and even psychologically beneficial type of real estate.

The report, assembled by a team of researchers from George Washington University’s Center for Real Estate and Urban Analysis, identifies the places in DFW that exemplify this national trend. The study delves into the key indicators for successful Established WalkUPs and the Emerging WalkUP markets ripe for investment.

(more…)

debate

Incumbent District 13 Dallas councilmember Jennifer Staubach Gates (center) debated former mayor Laura Miller (far right) Thursday. The Dallas Builders Association’s Phil Crone moderated.

Candy will dissect the debate later today, but for now, we have the recorded Dallas Builders Association debate between District 13 incumbent Jennifer Staubach Gates and former mayor Laura Miller. Let us know what you think! (more…)