On May 30, the City of Dallas made a pretty savvy auction sale of a city-owned lot, one of many across town, this one at 5639 Forest Lane which has been sitting idle for years, just east of the Dallas North Tollway.

The property failed to meet a minimum bid in January when (another) church wanted to buy it.

It’s kind of a sorry piece of property, history-wise, because the city bought it, probably paid too much for it, and then couldn’t do anything with it. The 150,702-square-foot, 3.45 acres are on the outskirts of Melshire Estates, where neighbors were bemoaning the chopping of a half-mile of trees along the Tollway by Oncor a few months back  — wonder how they feel about that now? Guess they don’t mind the house in foreclosure on Quincy one house in from Forest, though. 

11907 Quincy, listed for $448,000, is pending. Check out the potential, backs to Dallas North Tollway

(more…)

electricityThe good news is this week’s Wednesday WTF is being written. The bad news is it’s being written from a hotel room next to a strip club because home base has no electricity.

You think I’m kidding, but Monday when we couldn’t find any restaurants open, my sweet innocent child said from the backseat, “Oh look, Mom! There’s a buffet at that place. If they’re open we can go have lunch.”

electricity

So yeah, that was a whole thing.

Anyway, we spent Sunday night believing Oncor when it said we would have electricity by 5 p.m. Then 6 p.m. Then 9 p.m., then WTF PM ARE YOU DOING OUT THERE? And we were all trying to be very zen about it. We spent time outside. We filled up the wading pool. We ate popsicles.

But around midnight, with all of us sleeping in separate beds because all of us needed to starfish for maximum circulation, it became clear that Oncor knew as much as we did about the electrical grid of the Dallas Metropolitan Statistical Area. (more…)

Election

Legos made of Jello. This is important.

It’s 12:19 a.m. on what is now Sunday, and I just filed my election story. I’m saying this because it’s cause for celebration — I believe it was almost 2 a.m. last time. But I also realized that because I have a surplus of awake time now, as well as a surplus of snark, it’s a great time to review what I’ve learned in my time covering elections, and in my time covering this particular election.

Ready? (more…)

It was contentious, a lot. In fact, at one point almost anyone remotely affiliated with a Scott Griggs supporter was blocked by mayoral candidate Eric Johnson on social media. But in the end, he not only unblocked everyone, according to his campaign, but he also won a fairly combative race to become Dallas’ next mayor.

Johnson beat Griggs 55 percent to 44 percent.

Click on map to see larger version.

The tone Johnson took Saturday night was much lighter as he spoke to supporters after Griggs conceded. 

After making his way to the stage and hugging his wife, Johnson took a deep breath.

“This is one of those moments that you think you’re prepared for, but you’re just never prepared for something like this,” he said, going on to thank Griggs for his years of service to the city. (more…)

District 7Dallas City Council District 7 turned out to be one of the more notable races in the municipal election last month — the incumbent, Kevin Felder, garnered a distant fourth place in a crowded field of candidates.

But that doesn’t mean that there are two complete unknowns vying for the D7 seat, however. Tiffinni Young has spent time on the horseshoe before, having been elected in 2015 and losing her re-election campaign in the runoff election on June 10, 2017.

Her opponent, a high school teacher Adam Bazaldua, is a known quantity in the district as well, having served on several community groups and task forces.

At the end of election night, Bazaldua had 23 percent of the vote, and Young pulled in 22.17 percent.  All told, there were six races (five city and one Dallas ISD school board race) where none of the candidates reached the 50 percent threshold required to win outright, kicking off an extended election season that will culminate with a runoff election on June 8.

We solicited questions from readers and voters to craft a comprehensive questionnaire for each individual race. However, only Bazaldua returned his questionnaire — we reached out via email and social media to Young’s campaign and had no response.

We have Bazaldua’s responses in full below, but here are some highlights: (more…)

District 9

When it comes to city council races, politics play a big part in the health of Dallas — and therefore the health of the real estate market.

After the May 4 election, there were six races (five city and one Dallas ISD school board race) where none of the candidates reached the 50 percent threshold required to win outright, kicking off an extended election season that will culminate with a runoff election on June 8.

The race for Mark Clayton’s District 9 seat will also be settled this Saturday in a runoff election, with Paula Blackmon getting 36.86 percent of the vote, and Erin Moore getting 31.82 percent in the general election held in May.

We solicited questions from readers and voters to craft a comprehensive questionnaire for each individual race. Both Blackmon and Moore have answered our questionnaire, and some of their responses follow. Their full responses are at the end of this story. (more…)

penny candy

Actors Esau Price and Leon Addison Brown appear in the Dallas Theater Center’s ‘penny candy,’ which was written by playwright-in-residence Jonathan Norton and is set in Pleasant Grove (Photos by Ace Anderson/Courtesy Dallas Theater Center).

The Pleasant Grove in playwright Jonathan Norton’s ‘penny candy’, suffice to say, is home, but fraught with the attendant turmoil of a neighborhood in transition.

Jonathan Norton

Norton, who grew up in the Grove, portrays a snapshot of time in the community in his latest work, “penny candy,” which hits the stage with its world premiere as a Dallas Theater Center production at the Studio Theatre of the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre beginning Wednesday, June 5.

The story was borne by the extremely capable hands of Norton, the DTC’s playwright-in-residence, whose work has been produced or developed by a whos-who of theater companies, including PlayPenn, InterAct Theatre Company, Pyramid Theatre Company, Black and Latino Playwrights Conference, Bishop Arts Theatre Center, Castillo Theatre, Soul Rep Theater Company, African American Repertory Theater, Kitchen Dog Theater, Undermain Theatre, Theatre Three, and South Dallas Cultural Center.

His play ‘Mississippi Goddamn’ was a Finalist for the Harold and Mimi Steinberg/ATCA New Play Award and won the 2016 M. Elizabeth Osborn Award given by the American Theatre Critics Association.

His latest work tells the story of 12-year-old Jon-Jon, who helps his father run Paw Paw’s Candy Tree out of their one-bedroom apartment in Pleasant Grove. But as the neighborhood heads towards drug-fueled violence and racial tensions, the penny candy store begins to lose business, and the family is faced with the decision to leave or stay. (more…)

ArlingtonTexas is the 12th-best state when it comes to jobs, rent increases in Arlington are among the highest in the nation, and Dallas-Fort Worth is expected to add jobs this year. We have all the details in this week’s roundup of real estate news.

Texas Ranks 12th For Jobs

Arlington

Texas was tops in the country for monthly average starting salary, but took 12th overall in a WalletHub ranking of the best states for jobs. (more…)