medianMay’s home report is in for Dallas, and the median home price is up two percent year-over-year to $260,000, according to statistics from Texas Realtors.

What can you get for the median home price in Dallas? We took a look.

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David Weekly never looked so good! 

Design aficionado and former Real Estate agent Abigail Reynolds transformed an East Dallas “dark and dreary,” in Buckner Terrace to a “fresh and airy” that would generate love in any part of town. And her work proves that a good design eye and talent can transform even the most plain of Janes — in this case, a budget minded David Weekly home — into a world of clean living with color.

When asked to describe her home, a certified David Weekly green – build in a coveted gated neighborhood adjacent to downtown and White Rock Lake, Reynolds says one word comes to mind: color.

“Don’t get me wrong, I’m a fan of color pops and love to incorporate color accents into designing a space that is fun and beautiful. I draw a lot of energy from our years in Palm Springs and Los Angeles, but this house was something else color wise,” says Reynolds. “Something else! It had no cohesion to the color choices and needed a complete design overhaul.”

Before: Calling Mother Earth

She knew just the person up for the job: herself.

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I guess the question is, is there anything Mehrdad Moayedi WON’T BUY?  Like he may need a phone ap soon to keep up with everything in his portfolio, from the Crespi Estate Estates, to the Statler, to the Cabana Hotel, to his zero lot line homes I am eyeing along Forest Lane, to, oh yes, Collin Creek Mall and…. well just look at the Centurion American site.

We knew something was up at 4600 Samuell Boulevard  back in mid- December when we contacted the agent, Jessica Tello, and asked what’s up. We heard it was under contract, and that demolition would be involved.

“What,” wrote Bethany, “can you tell me about the pending sale, and the plans for the property?”

Hi Bethany,

Hope you had a nice weekend! Thanks for your message. At this time, the only detail we can provide is that it is under contract.

Thank you,

Jess

So yes, then the holidays happened, but Mehrdad Moayedi works ’round the clock, ’round the calendar.  He told Steve Brown he is buying the property to build about 400 single family homes on the 50 acre site of the former psychiatric hospital campus on Samuell Boulevard east of downtown — fantastic news, I’m sure, to the neighbors who were petrified this summer  when some  Dallas City Council members suggested the old hospital would be a great place for the homeless. The hospital was closed last year when state regulators threatened to shut it down. The campus includes nine historic buildings, many more than 80 years old, including the century-old neoclassical white house that was the original hospital: Timberlawn Sanitarium, built in  1917. As you may know, I have stayed in an historical insane asylum turned luxury hotel in Staunton, Virginia. 

Mehrdad plans to call the new development “Tennyson Village”. 

“This is an area where the city would like to see some redevelopment,” Moayedi said. “We want to build a neighborhood of nice homes.

“We think young professionals working downtown will want to live in this neighborhood.”

Moayedi said houses in the project would start at around $250,000.

Fifty acres leaves him plenty of space to develop about eight homes per acre, which should add a hefty amount of change to the city’s tax coffers. Timberlawn is also apparently close to two elementary schools as well as Skyline High School, which should further bolster sales. The last time I looked, the 50 acres were valued at $2.6 million on DCAD. 

And with that amount of density, it appears they won’t keep the original hospital as an amenity center, though that would have been kind of cool, especially come Halloween. The white frame home is on Preservation Dallas’ list of “most endangered historic places.” But like many older homes, it is loaded with problems and only salvation would be to be moved, which would require tenting.

Moayedi said he looked into the idea of reusing the 4,700-square-foot house.

“We thought about trying to preserve it as an amenity center, but its not in good enough shape,” he said. “The structure itself is in bad shape and full of asbestos.

“We don’t want to destroy anything that has any value,” he said. “We’d be happy to let someone come and move it or whatever.”

Buckner TerraceThis week’s Thursday Three Hundred in Buckner Terrace is a testament to the power of a good Realtor (or two) — it totally escaped our attention when it was with a discount broker a few months ago, and is now on the market with Lauri Ann Hanson and Aimee Schreiner of Dwell Partners with Dave Perry-Miller and Associates, who immediately reached out to us to pitch this great listing.

“We want to get it all the attention it deserves!” Schreiner told us.

The three-bedroom, two-and-a-half bath home sits on a corner lot at 3209 Sharpview Lane, which means, of course, plenty of trees and lots of backyard space.

Inside, an open floor plan makes for a great entertaining layout, with the heart of the plan at the kitchen, where an oversized quartz island overlooks the dining room and two spacious living rooms. (more…)

Buckner TerraceIt’s not often you can find a four bedroom, move-in ready home at a price point north of $300,000, but when Paige and Curt Elliott with Dave Perry-Miller — Park Cities told us about this Buckner Terrace listing, we knew we found our Tuesday Two Hundred for this week.

“It’s a fresh, neutral, and lightly lived in, rare four-bedroom in the sought-after Buckner Terrace,” Paige Elliott told us of their listing at 5631 Everglade Road.

With 1,998 square feet of upgraded living space, this 1968 Traditional has a flexible and open floor plan with the formal living area opening to the kitchen, breakfast nook, and second living room. (more…)

Two HundredSo, here’s the deal — sometimes we have an embarrassment of riches, and we find a whole slew of one price point, which is what happened this week – too many two hundreds, all awesome, and not enough Tuesday.

So what’s a writer to do? Well, she takes those surplus two hundreds and showcases the other two she really wanted to show you but you know, it’s the Tuesday Two Hundred, and not the Tuesday Two Hundred Listings of Two Hundreds.

Got that? Good. Buckle up. (more…)

Tucked away in East Dallas, less than four miles from the shores of White Rock Lake, this hidden gem at 5637 Emrose Terrace is a perfect example of renovations done right. From its espresso floors and decorative lighting to the new roof and radiant barrier insulation, literally everything in the home has been redone since 2015.

“It looks and feels like a very modern, nice home on the inside,” Dallas City Center agent Scott Noblett said. “You can see the pool when you walk through the front door, through the living room and out to the back patio.”

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By Abigail Kuch Reynolds
Guest Contributor

During last week’s Dallas City Council meeting, council members unanimously shot down a proposal for temporary shelters spread throughout the city in recreation centers as a temporary solution to the city’s critically growing number of homeless. In lieu of that proposal, members of the Council turned their attention to a possible full-time proposal in one location in District 7: the shuttered Timberlawn Behavioral Health System.

Timberlawn’s unsuitability as the permanent location for a homeless shelter can be argued from at least half a dozen angles. The City Council’s attention on it has left many of the surrounding area residents, such as myself, baffled at the suggestion and fearful of its serious ramifications for the area we’ve invested in as our home.

Timberlawn, a former behavioral health center, is the oldest private psychiatric facility in the state and boasts architectural beauty in a building that is more than 100 years old. These characteristics may make the main building eligible to be recognized as a historic landmark in the state of Texas. Timberlawn maintains 20 acres of sprawling landscape lined with mature trees, whose shade and dignity contribute to the elegance of the property.

The iconic landmark formerly provided private health services for those necessitating in-patient care and sits south of I-30 within Dallas city limits, minutes from the bustle of downtown Dallas. But it is nestled within a thriving residential community formally referred to as “Buckner Terrace.” The neighborhood is composed of a heterogeneous group of residents whose pride and investment in their neighborhood can be exhibited in their ability to unite in protest of a potential homeless shelter. Close to 1000 signatures on an online petition to City Council garnered in less than a week. This petition, I may note, has never been formally canvassed in-person, but is the result of viral sharing on Social Media, spreading like virtual wildfire throughout our small community.

As residents of Buckner Terrace, we represent the gentrification component in an evolving city and changing landscape of Dallas, which maintains its position as a booming metropolitan area with a stable and prosperous economic job market. It’s a location many of us chose to move to from out of state for the promise of affordable housing and a stable, cohesive community.

And now, a single City Council decision could destroy it. (more…)