Last night, District 14 Dallas City Council Member David Blewett held a town hall meeting to discuss Streetlights Residential’s proposal for a residential tower at Lemmon and Oak Lawn avenues. You’ve seen it before, so I won’t belabor the point (to catch up, skip the first listed story and you’re there).

In reading those older columns, you know what I think. I’d like more parking underground and I’d like the ass-end facing north Lemmon returned to its original, thinner profile. Kinda done. These sentiments and more were raised during the meeting.

The meeting was less vicious than expected, although the same elements that trail all zoning cases were in attendance. Speaking of attendance, while this meeting was posted on every social media light pole, about 100 attendees crammed into the Methodist Church’s meeting room – not a stellar turnout given the ubiquitous notification and density of the local neighborhood. Near the end, Blewett asked a series of leading questions to gauge the room. Who supported, who was drop-dead opposed and who was on the fence depending on some specific issues being managed. In other words, “who’s there?”, “who can get there?”, and “who’ll never get there?”  To cut the suspense, somewhere between a quarter to a third of the room were drop-dead opposed. Again, not a stellar turnout given the level of static this project has engendered.

Another telling metric came when Blewett asked the attendees how far away they lived. As Blewett closed the circle down to areas that might actually feel an impact, representation was sparse. Once the lack of local-locals was noted, attendees piped-up that they crossed the Lemmon and Oak Lawn Avenue intersection regularly. That’s a pretty shaky position. Are commuters’ opinions about development along their route a new bellwether? Construction would cease.

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Few neighborhoods offer the walkability, nightlife, and career opportunities quite like Uptown Dallas. This week we present three of the area’s hottest open houses you can’t afford to miss!

The Hall Street Stunner

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Zheger Cuesta with Vibrant Real Estate has listed 3208 Cole Avenue Apt. 2304 for $320,000.

These Uptown open houses are too good to miss! From a top-floor condo to a glass gem to a historic Queen Anne, there is something for everyone with our top three picks. Make a day of it and hit all three this Sunday, and then tell us which one is your favorite.

Cole Avenue Condo

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Klyde Warren Park

Dallas’ landscape is crisscrossed with interstate highways that cut through and divide our city’s neighborhoods. The lasting effects of these high-speed thoroughfares on our city have been felt for years, but until recently, the only option was to grin and bear it. With an acute lack of will to remove them, urban planners had to come up with a solution for restoring the connection between neighborhoods. The answer: deck parks and connective parks.

Our first in North Texas was Klyde Warren Park, and our city can’t imagine what life would be like without the deck park that connects Uptown to downtown Dallas. And the city is planning a second deck park over Interstate 35 near Highway 67  to connect North Oak Cliff to the Dallas Zoo, though that project wasn’t without contention. Even Plano is getting on board with deck parks, with plans in the works for a park over the Dallas North Tollway that would connect the Shops at Legacy with Legacy West.

To further explore this growing trend, the Dallas Architecture Forum is hosting a panel discussion called “Deck Parks and Connective Parks in Dallas” moderated by Elissa Izmailyan, senior director for community and economic development for the Trinity Park Conservancy. The panel will feature Tara Green, past president of Klyde Warren Park and principal of OJB Landscape Architecture; Diane Jones Allen, director of Landscape Architecture at UTA, CAPPA; and Molly Plummer, Parks for People Program Manager for the Trust for Public Land in North Texas.

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Our Steal: Lauri Ann Hanson and Aimee Schreiner of Dwell Partners have listed 2200 Victory Avenue Apt 1902 for $849,000.

Uptown Dallas has never looked so good! Our latest Splurge vs. Steal takes you inside two of the best condos Dallas has to offer, each with sky high views and luxurious appointments, but with price points that are miles apart. Which would you choose, the Blue Ciel splurge or the Victory Park steal?

Splurge: Exquisite 18thFloor Blue Ciel Corner Condo For $3.495M

Our Splurge: Andrew Danna has listed 3130 N. Harwood Street Apt. 1801 for $3.495 million.

Modern Elegance

When you are looking for modern elegance and views, with all the bells and whistles, you go to Blue Ciel. And this week, we put the spotlight on one of its gems – an 18th floor corner unit affording some of the best views of downtown Dallas. Just ask listing agent Andrew Danna.

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Our Splurge: 2300 Wolf Street, Unit 9A,  is listed by Sharon Quist of Dave Perry-Miller Park Cities for $3,300,000.

Nothings says “I have arrived” like living in a Dallas condo high above the city. Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer, a busy professional climbing the ranks, or an empty nester looking for the convenience of high-rise living, Dallas has something for you. Which is exactly why we chose Uptown for our latest Splurge vs. Steal.

Offering hip cocktail lounges, a posh shopping scene, and plenty of walkable, live-work-play stops along the way, Uptown is a place to see and be seen. Looking for an Uptown home to call your own? Here we feature two Uptown condos, each with updated interiors and a prime Uptown Dallas address, but with price points that are miles apart.

Tell us which one you would choose – the super luxe Stoneleigh splurge or the Brownstone State Street steal. We would love to hear in the comments.

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Vivo Realty Group just launched a new membership-based business model that provides the infrastructure that agents need at an affordable, tiered pricing scheme. The brokerage has three locations in North Texas: Plano, Uptown Dallas, and North Oak Cliff’s Bishop Arts District. (Courtesy Photo)

As members of our editorial team cover the annual National Association of Real Estate Editors conference, a recurring theme is the transformation of the traditional real estate brokerage. The existing model, industry disruptors say, no longer serves the individual agent. 

Locally, more and more brokerages are touting their digital assets, using social media and mobile apps to make real estate transactions easier for buyers and sellers. But what about infrastructure?

“The real estate industry is not just changing, it’s changed,” says David Maez Jr., co-founder and broker at Vivo Realty Group, which launched their new subscription-based brokerage model. “We had to think, ‘What’s wrong with the way we have been doing things for over 150-plus years?’ The brokerage model has failed to innovate and deliver what agents need: Flexible pay structures, places to meet clients and work from that are easily assessable, contract, and marketing support.”

So Vivo, with three offices in hot North Texas neighborhoods — Plano, Uptown Dallas, and North Oak Cliff — made a new model that fills the gaps of independent agents without sacrifices.

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Conceptual rendering for Site A at Allen Street and McKinney Avenue

Businesses and residents in Uptown have been discussing making two-way streets from the currently one-way Cole Ave., Carlisle St., and McKinney Ave. You may have seen the plans already, maybe you’ve attended one of the many community meetings.

However, you may not have heard much about the three public spaces this plan will create. As the streets change, excess right-of-way will be left vacant. And Uptown, Inc. has plans for landscaping and hardscaping these small public spaces. More than the direction we drive, these public spaces will fundamentally change our experience in Uptown and could be the most impactful part of this re-design plan.

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