Stockbroker Tudor

In the 1920s, architects educated in Europe brought the Tudor look to the East Coast. These grand homes were known as Stockbroker Tudors because the financially successful clients they were constructed for had made their fortunes in the stock market. If you built a Stockbroker Tudor, you were making a statement about not only your stability and wealth but also your sophistication and taste.

When I spotted this gorgeous example of Tudor architecture at 3545 Hanover Street, listed with Jonathan Rosen of The Collective Residential for $3.95 million, I was sure it was original. The steeply pitched roof, embellished doorway, and the second story with stucco and decorative half-timbering are the distinctive hallmarks of a 1920s Tudor.

“That’s exactly what we wanted you to think,” architect Larry E. Boerder said. “That was our goal all along, and most people do think it was built in the 1920s, not in 2006.”

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Modern Neoclassical

Photo courtesy of Karlisch Studio

If you’re looking for a luxury home that already has a distinctive style, look no further than our stunning Monday Morning Millionaire. This modern neoclassical University Park home was a stunner when it was built by TAA Custom Homes. However, every great home needs a design fairy godmother’s magic touch. The owners of 3533 Villanova Street chose one of the best to sprinkle a perfect amount of fairy dust over their home. Denise McGaha, for the uninitiated, is a bit of a whiz at marrying traditional and modern and adding a spicy dash of pizzazz to make a home truly unique. (more…)

By Amy Rose Dobson
Special Contributor

There’s an almost-finished, high-end home in University Park that brings a touch of French flair to the neighborhood without being too over the top. A perfect blend of transitional elements makes this home feel like it is part of this luxury enclave while also bringing a heightened sense of sophistication to the area.
 
Robert Elliott Custom Homes — a CandysDirt.com Approved Builder — has brought this nearly-7,000-square-foot project from idea to fruition, and even though they haven’t put the final touches on the remaining details we wanted our readers to be the first to know this stunning home is just about ready to show the world. 
 

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Our Inwood National Bank Home of the Week is a modern luxury mansion in University Park, designed by award-winning commercial architect Edwin Brantley Smith. Created for his family, 3412 Wentwood Drive was one of the first cutting-edge, modern homes in the Park Cities. (more…)

Extraordinary University Park Charles Dilbeck | CandysDirt.com

One of Dallas’ most prolific and beloved architects left a legacy of exceptional design, and one of his most outstanding examples just hit the market. 

The University Park Charles Dilbeck at 4144 Shenandoah St. stands as a jaw-dropping illustration of this master’s architectural genius. Sitting on a corner lot, this picturesque property offers a sense of presence and importance. Inspired by Dilbeck’s time in the Loire Valley in France, this castle-like home was designed upon his return and built in 1934. His marvelous imagination expertly crafted the enchanting spaces in this house, both thoughtful and inspired throughout its 3,393 square feet. 

“This University park Charles Dilbeck has been beautifully maintained and meticulously updated in 2017 with loving attention to detail,” said listing agent Becky Frey with Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty. “It offers seamless indoor-outdoor entertaining options, like a saltwater cocktail pool and covered patio, and it really is an outstanding and significant property.”

This home has three bedrooms, three full bathrooms, one half bath, two living areas, and two dining areas.

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Original Hillcrest State Bank building peels back its skin

In 1930, the Hillcrest State Bank was formed. Doing well, as banks do, by 1938 they were able to open a George Dahl-designed location on Hillcrest Avenue between Daniel and Haynie avenues. In 1981, Hillcrest State Bank changed its name to Texas Commerce Bank.  In 1998, the name was changed again to Chase Bank of Texas and was folded into Chase Manhattan Bank in 2000.  In 2004, Ohio’s Bank One was acquired by Chase foreshadowing the bank’s headquarters move to Ohio in 2004 where it remains today.

As you can see, for all the name changes, this building never actually changed hands until the bank had abandoned it.  First to try redevelopment was Dallasite Albert Huddleston who envisioned a mixed-use project that never gained traction with University Park officials or neighbors.  After a decade he gave up and in 2015 local developer Jim Strode decided to try his luck, which eventually succeeded.

Along with ownership and name changes, there have been structural changes.  As the picture above hints, over the years there was some pretty major tinkering to this building.

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You have seen this house. You have seen the horse bust on the wooden picket gate, the white-washed, slurried brick, and the thick mane of overgrown wisteria that made you want to go home and give your plants super food.

(Perhaps you have even snipped off a stem?)

You have gazed at it when you were on Preston Road northbound, the red light grounding you long enough to take in the four corners at University. But I guarantee you, Santa Clause could be on one of those corners in August and you would not see him. The only thing you or anyone ever sees is 4100 University. The home is one of the few remaining original Dilbeck duplexes in UP. It is like a little country cottage camouflaged by rich shrubbery that, even before I knew what a Dilbeck was, drew me into a love affair with this house.

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Photography: Costa Christ Media

Our Inwood National Bank Home of the Week is a perfect template for everything you need to do when you build a home today. This University Park custom transitional has all the features buyers crave, from a floor plan that flows beautifully to flawless finish out. Hats off to Mike Regan of Regan Custom Homes for this 5,483-square-foot beauty at 4117 Amherst Avenue. If you can convince the sellers to leave the furniture, you’re all set.
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