Gracious, upscale living has a new address in the heart of Dallas, with easy access to the Katy Trail, the Arts District, high-end shopping, and some of the city’s finest restaurants. 

Live above it all at the Residences at the Stoneleigh with dramatic views of downtown, a lush greenbelt, sunrises, and sunsets from your balcony at ​2300 Wolf St. The 22-story building is nestled between historic Turtle Creek and the energy of Uptown and offers a rare opportunity to totally customize a luxury high-rise unit. 

Floorplans range from 2,400 square feet to over 4,200 square feet of shell space — buyers can even combine units to create a home up to 15,000 square feet.

“It’s the perfect way to have total control over the design/build process and each shell will be hand-crafted by one Dallas’ finest homebuilders, TriArc Construction and Sharif & Munir,” said Stoneleigh Sales and Marketing Manger Donna Smith. “We’ve already sold over 60 percent of available units to buyers who understand what a one-of-a-kind property this is in Dallas.” 

Also available: turn-key, designer-finished homes with all of the details already in place in one of four floorplans. Buyers can work with their preferred interior designer or a recommended designer to select the perfect furnishings, too. Move-in ready homes mean the Residences at the Stoneleigh lifestyle can become a reality all the sooner. 

Now, I can’t go any further without mentioning the fabulous amenities! Jump to read all about them. 

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Greek Revival
If you have been in Dallas for a while, you know this Greek Revival mansion, and you certainly know the name, Rita Crocker Clements. Newcomers might need a small history lesson, so let’s begin. Rita was a smart, strong, savvy, sophisticated woman that never forgot her ranching family roots. She was an active volunteer not only in politics but also in her community. To say she was a mover and a shaker is to put it mildly. (more…)

Turtle Creek Penthouse
You’ve never seen anything like this Turtle Creek Penthouse. Never. It’s easily the equivalent of the Palace of Versailles, but 22 stories into the sky. It’s a fantasy, a dream, a love story, and it’s finally available — after 40 years. (more…)

When a condo is first built and still controlled by the developer, HOA dues are kept low to not scare off buyers. Once the developer is gone, those payments have to be reassessed to ensure they meet the needs of the ongoing repair and maintenance of the building. (Hint, they’re not.) The Mayfair, neighboring Lee Oak Lawn Park, is 18 years old, and like all buildings, various maintenance requirements need to be met. 

Soon after the Mayfair gained independence, they began conducting reserve studies that detailed the condition  of their infrastructure, its life expectancy, and estimated costs to repair or replace.  As you know, I’m big on HOAs doing reserve studies to avoid surprises that typically equate to a special assessment and/or the sudden failure of a critical element of a building (That noise you heard? Surprise! The A/C will be out for the month of August).

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This statue of Robert E. Lee overlooks Lee Park in Dallas. Could removing this statue celebrating a controversial Confederate leader hurt Turtle Creek real estate?

[Editor’s Note: This post reflects the opinion of the writer and should not be interpreted as the editorial position of CandysDirt.com.]

I lived in Dallas for at least 10 years when I asked someone, “Who is Lee Park named after?” I assumed it was a great city forefather.

Robert E. Lee, I was told; the man who surrendered to Union troops in the bitter War Between the States, the only civil war in U.S. history.

Now, a movement that is growing like a snowball rolling down a mountainside — and crescendoed Saturday night at an anti-hate rally reportedly attended by thousands in front of Dallas City Hall — wants our city to rid itself of Lee Park’s eponymous statue. Duke University removed their statutes yesterday. However, this is also not an overnight movement: some Dallas City Council members have been working on a removal since last April.

I’m not sure if changing the name of the park will follow. The statue was built in Dallas during the Depression in 1936, when the Civil War was well over. Though the war ended, deeply rooted racism was not wiped out with Lee’s unconditional surrender at Appomatox Courthouse in 1865.

I’m not a native Southerner, so I have to wonder why the statue was erected in the first place. This is not Lee’s hometown; he was a native of Virginia. After Virginia, Texas has the largest collection of  Robert E. Lee monuments in the nation.

Why look up to a man who fought to let human beings own other human beings?

And last week, Jennifer Staubach Gates, City Councilwoman in District 13, who is making a lot of mayoral-like noise, wrote her conservative, wealthy constituents that the statue must come down:

My office has received a number of inquiries about the removal of Confederate statues in the City of Dallas, so I want to be clear on my position. 

I strongly support the removal of these statues. Symbols of white supremacy, neo-Nazis, the KKK or other hate groups are unacceptable and must be removed from public spaces that serve all of our citizens, including our public schools. The issue should not be whether or not they are removed, but rather the process of how they are removed, and I look forward to an open dialog on moving forward. 

The sooner we complete this process and remove these unacceptable symbols in public spaces, the stronger we will be as a City. If you have questions about this issue or thoughts on the process, please feel free to contact my office.

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This must mean I’m getting old. I remember when they BUILT Regents Park. I loved it then, I love it now. Regents Park would be the ideal place for my next home — not really downsizing, but right sizing in extreme elegance with zero exterior maintenance, but NOT a condo. Regents Park was built in 2003, as the Dallas high rise/brownstone/density living scene was just hitting the gas pedal. It is one of the most sought after living spaces in the Turtle Creek-Mansion Park area. What’s practically across the street?

The Mansion on Turtle Creek.

It is rare that these extremely well designed, commercially constructed homes are available. And 3522 Gillespie, marketed by Emily Price Carrigan, is just hot on the market. It offers four stories of beautifully designed, jewel-box perfection. (more…)

Mediterranean Villa 4107 Turtle Creek Blvd 1
It’s not often I come across a home where it’s hard to find enough superlatives to create a worthy description. Even the photographs of this Mediterranean villa, as gorgeous as they are, cannot begin to showcase the depth of beauty of this estate.

When listing agent David Griffin said, “You have to see this one,” I drove right over. (more…)

Glenridge Estates

The luxe Glenridge Estates home at 4002 Park Ln. is one of our five featured open houses this week.

We love bringing you an insider look at hot North Texas properties with our CandysDirt Open Houses of the Week column. Every Thursday, we pick five fabulous open houses in Dallas (and the ‘burbs from time to time) you shouldn’t miss.

This week, our houses range in price from $297,615 to $765K. A swoon-worthy Glenridge Estates traditional, pictured above, tops our roundup. You’ll also find a four-bedroom Kiest Forest home on a creek lot in Oak Cliff, a Prestonwood West garden home with soaring ceilings, and more!

 

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