After a show-and-tell session about the history of the lot adjacent to Eatzi’s, StreetLights Residential came back to the Oak Lawn Committee with a better plan.

For those who need a reminder about why the Oak Lawn Committee is critical to the neighborhood’s integrity, last night’s meeting was a case in point.

Last month, StreetLights Residential brought a proposal for the corner of Oak Lawn and Lemmon Avenues next to the flagship/original Eatzi’s. You may remember I called the building’s design “unfortunate” and “poor company” to its surroundings. Things have changed.

After last month’s meeting, I had a chance to sit down with Greg Coutant, the director of development for StreetLights, and share my thoughts and concerns. We talked about the movie theater originally on the plot. I also brought along a book covering a century of high-rise residential design and played show-and-tell. They listened.

StreetLights went back to the movie theater’s archive (housed in the Dallas Public Library) for inspiration from the original 1931 theater. Now the Oak Lawn Avenue façade looks like an update on that original theater – complete with sign and marquee. It creates a visual connection to the Melrose Hotel. It also begins to heal the wound this parcel has represented to the neighborhood since the theater was torn down in 1985. I was impressed with the work so far.

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At last night’s Oak Lawn Committee meeting, Streetlights Residential had a lot of explaining to do in regards to the design of their planned tower at Lemmon and Oak Lawn avenues.

If you’re in a Google satellite, the building on the lower right is the proposed 21-story apartment building. It would supplant the Shell station and Pizza Hut, and would be next to Eatzi’s (which is also sorta part of the plan).

For those without long memories, this is the parcel of land that empowered the neighborhood to set out the Oak Lawn Plan and PD-193 that is rigorously overseen by the Oak Lawn Committee. On this lot once stood the Esquire Theater, built in 1931 as the Melrose Theater. Lore says the reason “Esquire” was chosen in the renaming is that it had the same number of letters and would fit on the marquee. The theater would have turned 88 this year had Lincoln Property not demolished it in February 1985, in the middle of the night (also according to lore). The demolition catalyzed the neighborhood. So as things go, this is sort of hallowed ground in Oak Lawn.

Thus, when Streetlights Residential presented their proposal for this long-neglected corner, questions naturally arose about the building’s unfortunate exterior. More than one OLC member asked why Streetlights wasn’t going all out for a “signature” building on such a highly trafficked corner.

The response was that the exterior was still being worked on. Good. Thus far, it appears to be poor company to other high-rises seen in their picture, and the many other well-done projects Streetlights is known for.

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We are so excited to be the first in town to show you The McKenzie, StreetLights Residential’s newest and most glam property offering in Dallas.

Last video, we told you about all the “common space” amenities in this building — trust me, none of them are common — from the multiple, beautifully decked-out salons and parlors to the commercially perfect kitchen where you can cater an entire dinner party and keep the mess out of your house.

This time, we take you inside several units. Get ready to be wowed by the amenities behind your door: the truly gourmet kitchens, the high end name-brand appliances, the storage, the finish outs, the closets, the bathrooms, the SHUBS (shower/tub combo’s, may be the first in Dallas). 

Because we know that when you make that big switch to renting, your main concern is what lies inside that front door to your home. The folks at StreetLights went overboard on the details for these interior spaces: they even put in dining room wainscoting and, in some units, built-in buffet bars. Clearly these are homes for downsizers who will occasionally want to pull out all the china, crystal, and flatware to entertain just as they did in their previous home. 

The nice thing about The McKenzie? You have your choice of dining rooms and kitchens to choose from. And if you really want to cook up a storm, you can maybe even use BOTH… 

Again, seeing is believing. We want to show you the interiors, mouldings, laundry rooms, Wolf Ranges, wine fridges, closet space, “shubs” (those sexy shower/tub combos) and all..

Doug Chesnut-cropped

 

DFW Reimagined and CNU North Texas hosted their Fall Breakfast Seminar Wednesday, with an interview of Doug Chestnut, CEO and Founder of StreetLights Residential.

With their eight recent and current projects in Dallas, and many more nationwide, StreetLights Residential is on a roll. In Dallas, you’re probably familiar with their work. Recent and current projects include:

The Jordan on McKinney Ave at Pearl St, The McKenzie just off Knox St, The Case Building in Deep Ellum, The Taylor on Carlisle St in Uptown, Trinity Green on Singleton in West Dallas, The Union at Field and Cedar Springs, Residences next to Deep Ellum’s Knights of Pythias building, and another yet-unannounced residential project in Deep Ellum featuring artist living and artisan shops.

The Jordan

The Jordan

Doug confirmed that this demand wave they’re riding, for more urban residences, is a demographic trend that will not be changing anytime soon. Many Baby Boomers who lost a lot of equity in the financial downturn of 2008 decided to liquefy their home equity and change their living situation. That, plus the 2 million Millennials turning 22 years old every year for the next eight years, is a lot of demand. Many of these young professionals don’t have the income to buy a home, nor desire a lifestyle that requires driving. In essence, they’re looking for quality of life through an urban lifestyle with amenities close at hand.

StreetLights Residential has built its business on this principle — that a building and the neighborhood’s design creates lasting value and quality of life. Said Chestnut: “Endearing neighborhoods have activated streets, parks, and entertainment nearby. You go to bed exhausted and can’t wait to get up early and do it all over again. Entertainment doesn’t have to be Six Flags or million-dollar museums, it can be as simple as having a glass of wine on a patio.” Great cities flow.

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Photo: StreetLights

The Case Building will be the first residential highrise in Deep Ellum. Photo: StreetLights

People have been calling Deep Ellum home since the late 1800s, and the historic district in downtown Dallas is entering a new era with its first residential highrise.

The 17-story, 337-unit Case Building will be the largest new real estate project ever built in Deep Ellum, located near Hall and Main streets, just south of Baylor Medical Center. Dallas-based Westdale Properties and StreetLights Residential are teaming up to develop the property.

“Deep Ellum is known for its rich art and music scene. The ability for residents to walk or bike to local galleries, music venues, restaurants, and shops fits well with Streetlights’ vision of a neighborhood-friendly urban development,” said StreetLights CEO Doug Chesnut in a statement. “The population in this area continues to grow, and StreetLights is excited to provide a building inspired by the architecture and style of Deep Ellum for this expanding community.”

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Photo courtesy Wood Partners

Another residential development is underway near West Dallas’ super hot Trinity Groves neighborhood with the construction of Alta Yorktown by Wood Partners LLC.

The development will include 226 luxury apartments in three, four-story buildings on six acres. The property, located at 660 Yorktown St., is just one mile west of downtown Dallas, and sits near the Trinity Groves restaurant, retail, and entertainment area.

Rents at Alta Yorktown will average just over $1,300 a month for apartment homes that average 827 square feet (available as studio, one, two, and three bedrooms). Leasing will begin toward the end of 2015, and construction is slated for completion toward the middle of 2016.

Interior finishes in the apartments will include granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, tile backsplashes, Shaker wood cabinets, upgraded fixtures, and wireless technology packages. Community amenities will include an outdoor swimming pool and courtyard, grilling stations, and fire pits. The property will also have a small amount of retail space.

Alta Yorktown is just one of multiple new developments in and around Trinity Groves, where Wood Partners has a big stake in the neighborhood. It sits next to the Sylvan Thirty mixed-use project, in where Wood Partners built the 200 apartments, and the Alta West Commerce apartments, which will have 252 units. Jump to read more!

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Photo courtesy Oak Cliff Blog

The clock is ticking for the old Mission Motel in West Dallas as Trammell Crow Residential begins work on a new development on the site and adjoining lots, which will include 300 rental units, as well as 14,000 square feet of retail space.

“We are tearing it down. We just finished asbestos abatement and will start demo soon,” said Matthew Enzler, Managing Director for Development at Trammell Crow Residential.

We reported on the developer’s purchase of the Mission Motel last July. Over the holidays, the developer tore down an old bank at Fort Worth Avenue and Yorktown Street. The Mission Motel and two other nearby properties will also be cleared soon, Juan’s Body & Frame and Nino’s Body Shop. Jump to read more.

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The Trinity Village development in West Dallas will begin in 2015. Photo courtesy of Dallas Morning News.

Work will begin on the Trinity Village development in West Dallas in 2015. Rendering courtesy of StreetLights Residential.

More good news for development in West Dallas with word Thursday that Dallas-based Stonelake Capital Partners has closed on a 25-acre tract of industrial property on Singleton Boulevard, west of Sylvan Avenue.

Along with developer StreetLights Residential, Stonelake is planning a $200 million mixed-use development at 1000 Singleton Boulevard, on the southwest corner of Singleton and Sylvan.

This is 2014’s largest single redevelopment property in West Dallas, and it will bring about 1,500 new residential units to the area west of Downtown Dallas. (more…)