Frank Welch Honored with Inagural Memorial Lecture by Architect Ted Flato | CandysDirt.com

Hillside House living room by Ted Flato in Austin, TX. Flato will give the inagural Frank Welch memorial lecture on Jan. 30. Photo: Aaron Leitz

Known as the dean of Texas architecture, Frank Welch was a prolific and imminently talented architect who spent a half century designing schools, churches, commercial buildings, and homes in Dallas, Midland, and Odessa. 

Ted Flato, FAIA

Welch died last June at the age of 90 and the Dallas Architecture Forum has established the Frank Welch Memorial Lecture to be presented each season as a part of its lecture series. The inaugural lecture will be given Jan. 30 by Ted Flato, FAIA, Co-Founder of Lake Flato Architects, one of the most honored and respected architecture firms in the country.

“The architectural philosophy and outstanding award-winning work of Ted Flato make him the perfect choice to present the [lecture],” said Forum Executive Director Nate Eudaly. “Like Frank Welch, Ted Flato designs projects that are shaped by the opportunities and challenges presented by their environments, and he seeks to create a seamless connection between interior spaces and the surrounding outdoors.”

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Bob Harris, FAIA, LEED Fellow, Lake|Flato Architects

Bob Harris, FAIA, LEED Fellow, Lake|Flato Architects

Millennials are a generation 68 million strong in the United States, and their interest in socially responsible and sustainable design and architecture is huge.

The next Dallas Architecture Forum event is a panel discussion called The Social Initiative, focusing on this group of Americans born between 1981 and 1996. Moderated by Bob Harris, this panel will look at why Millennials care less about ego, form, or aesthetics in architecture and design, and more about the needs and experiences of people and bridging boundaries among disciplines, demographics, and neighborhoods.

Harris a partner and lead for the Eco-Conservation studio for Lake|Flato Architects in San Antonio. He has more than 20 years of project experience combining award-winning design with sustainable solutions. His work with environmental issues ranges from land preservation advocacy to sustainable urban design. Harris is joined by three panelists:

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Norman D. Ward Architect won one of three top awards from the Fort Worth AIA for the Huynh Residence. The southeast-­‐facing entry courtyard is enclosed on three sides with two stone veneer bedroom pavilions and an entry wall sheathed in a cypress rain screen. Photo: Fort Worth AIA

Norman D. Ward Architect won one of three top awards from the Fort Worth AIA for the Huynh Residence. The southeast-­facing entry courtyard is enclosed on three sides with two stone veneer bedroom pavilions and an entry wall sheathed in a cypress rain screen. Photo: Fort Worth AIA

North Texas’ top architects gathered recently at the Modern Museum of Fort Worth as the American Institute of Architects’ local chapter gave nine prestigious design awards. Projects included a college, a nonprofit theater, and private homes.

Top Honor Awards went to architects Greg Ibañez, Tommy Stewart, and Norman Ward.

Four Merit Awards were given out, three of which went to VLK Architects, and one to Greg Ibañez.

Two Studio Awards went to Bart Shaw Architect and Marta Rozanich of Konstrukcio Studio.

This year’s jury was led by Randy Brown of Randy Brown Architects in Omaha, Neb. with Emily Little of Clayton & Little in Austin and Bill Aylor of Lake Flato Architects in San Antonio. The three looked at 31 entries, and were free to give as many awards as they deemed merited.

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Former Kimbell Art Musuem staffer Emily Sano and architect Gilson Riecken built an homage to the Fort Worth art museum in Alamo Heights. (Photo: Wall Street Journal)

Maybe it’s just because I haven’t worked in any truly beautiful structures, but I would never model my home after a former workplace. Who wants to go home and be reminded of work?

Emily Sano did.

After working at Fort Worth’s Kimbell Art Museum for about 10 years, Sano accepted a position at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. Still, she remained heartsick for the place where she spent many a day admiring the light and flow of the Louis Khan-designed museum, says this piece from the Wall Street Journal.

So Sano and her partner, architect Gilson Riecken, bought the Alamo Heights lot from heiress Nancy Hamon, tore down five buildings and built an homage to the Kimbell.

The home, designed by Lake Flato Architects (Dallas Arboretum, Bluffview modern home, and a gazillion other stunning projects)  is freaking amazing. Besides being LEED Platinum certified, it is pretty much the perfect place to hang and admire art, which is a good thing considering Sano’s collection of Asian art and artifacts.

I am sure the couple has a window washer on speed dial, because holy cannoli this four-bedroom, 4,600 2,260-square-foot home is like half floor-to-ceiling windows.

I’ve gotta know: What museum would you model your fantasy home after?