home pricesHome sales fell in North Texas in the fourth quarter of 2018, Dallas-Fort Worth hit record home prices last year, and the Arlington Black Chamber of Commerce will hold its Hard Hat Construction Expo — and we have all this and more in this week’s roundup of real estate news.

Area Home Sales Fall in 4Q 2018

While the median home price grew, home sales in North Texas fell 7.6 percent in the fourth quarter of 2018, a report by Texas A&M’s Real Estate Center said.

Area home sales fell to 22,402 transactions, while the median home price grew 2.4 percent over the year to $260,000. Months of inventory rose 32.5 percent to 2.5 months, and residential property listings increased to 29.4 percent in 2018 to 20,627 listings.

Courtesy the Texas A&M Real Estate Center

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11422 East Ricks Circle is a listing from Becky Frey that is pending sale.

What goes up has to come down, at some point, right?

It’s like that with home values. Except home values in Dallas have never shot skyward as much as they have in coastal cities and international hubs like Miami and New York City. Our home prices creep up by 5 to 7 percent a year. Then they stay there for a few years until the upward trend starts again. The only time I remember Dallas home prices actually declining as in the late 1980s, agree?

Comes news this week from Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller Home Price Index that Dallas home prices were up only 5.2 percent from where they were a year ago. Which is less than the 6.2 percent nationwide home price gain from June of 2017. So for the first time in a long time, we are dragging behind the national average, not leading it.

In fact, Dallas-area home prices expanded by the smallest percentage in almost six years.

The silver lining: (copy and paste this story for DCAD) if prices start to stabilize, our property taxes will, too. Oh and don’t let the Dallas City Council fool you into thinking they are lowering taxes, either. They are trying to lower the rate, because property taxes in this state are set by values. So all these nice Case-Shiller reports have brought in increased revenues from property taxes.

So, should we be concerned? No.

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200

It’s no secret that $200,000 won’t get you far in some places — for instance, in Manhattan, it’ll get you 126 square feet of home, which is about half the size of the average one-car garage, a recent analysis by PropertyShark revealed.

“While the results were indeed astonishing, we didn’t think there would be such a huge discrepancy between the most expensive and least expensive cities,” PropertyShark’s Robert Demeter writes. (more…)

Dallas-Fort Worth topped the nation in new apartment completions last year — finishing almost 28,000 new rental units in 2017.

According to RealPage, the metro area’s 27,974 completions were part of the 395,777 completions for the 150 largest metro markets nationwide for the year. New York City’s 23,207 came in second, and Houston was third place with 21,404 new units. Austin made the top 10 with 10,907 apartment completions. (more…)

Two new reports paint a bright picture of the housing market in Midland and Odessa now and for the next three years.

The Local Monitor Reports, released today, cite a 7 percent increase in Midland home prices over the last 12 months, which puts the average home price at $183,463. In Odessa, prices have gone up 5 percent over the last year and the current average home price is $210,980. In the last three years, home prices were up 10 percent in both markets.

The good news doesn’t stop there.

Read the whole story over on MidlandDirt.com!

 

 

home prices

Photo: Dan Moyle

Two new reports from Local Monitor Report are projecting big increases in home values in Midland and Odessa over the next three years, almost double the national average. Prices are predicted to rise even more.

Home values for Midland are forecast to increase by 8 percent over the next 12 months—compare that to national forecast of 4.6 percent. In the second and third years, values are forecast to increase 9 percent each year, a 26 percent increase in three years.

Midland home prices are projected to increase even more, at 30 percent over the next three years. In the last 12 months, prices have gone up by 7 percent, bringing the average home price in Midland to $183,463.

In Odessa, the report is predicting a 7 percent increase in home values over the next 12 months, and 9 percent in each of the next two years. That’s a total projected increase of at least 25 percent.

Odessa home prices are forecast to increase more, at 29 percent over the next three years. Odessa home prices have increased by 5 percent in the last 12 months, and the average home price is now $210,980.

All this adds up to a “low risk” categorization by Local Monitor Report for real estate investments in both Midland and Odessa, good news for homeowners and investors, alike.

See the full story at MidlandDirt.com.

The Lone Star State isn’t the same place as it was during the big 1980s oil bust, and is better weathering falling oil prices, but further price plunges and worker layoffs could negatively impact home sales and construction.

This is according to new research by Texas A&M Real Estate Center research economist James Gaines, who published Texas 2015 Housing Market and the Price of Oil last week. The six-page report explains that Texas’ economy has diversified significantly since the 80s bust, relying much more on healthcare, technology, and other sectors.

Here’s the takeaway:

The price of Texas oil and the upstream energy sector is a prime cause of concern for Texas’ 2015 economy and housing market. History shows that Texas’ housing does not depend on high oil prices. In fact, the state’s housing market has thrived at prices within a wide range of oil prices lower than those experienced in 2013 and the first half of 2014.

Read the full story over on MidlandDirt.com!

 

 

 

Oil prices may or may not influence home values and sales in Dallas, but Houston and the Permian Basin may feel the effects of the dropping price per barrel.

Oil prices may or may not influence home values and sales in Dallas, but Houston and the Permian Basin may feel the effects of the dropping price per barrel.

It seems like economists can’t make heads or tails of the dropping oil prices, other than it’s good for consumers. I filled my little hybrid up the other day for less than $30, so I’m going to call it an obvious win in that column. But with the high demand and limited supply of housing in the Permian Basin, and how Houston home values have skyrocketed, we’re left wondering if these two Texas regions will bear the brunt of cheap oil.

“Oil prices are certainly something to keep an eye on,” said Metrostudy’s David Brown in this DMN report. “As long as oil prices do not continue to decline and don’t stay at a level below $55 a barrel for a sustained period, we should continue to see solid demand for housing in the region.”

On the other hand, Trulia’s Jed Kolko says the impact on home values is coming, but it won’t be felt immediately.

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