From Staff Reports

According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, many states have barely recovered from the housing crash in 2007 when the real estate bubble burst, a data visualization HowMuch.net revealed.

“In fact, the housing market is still below its 2007 figures in several locations around the country,” the cost information website said of a comparison of 2007 data and 2017 data.

The website’s analysts looked created a way to see before-and-after snapshots of the housing market before and after the Great Recession.

“Before the housing bubble burst, the most affordable housing market was sandwiched in the middle of the country between the expensive West and East Coasts,” the article explained. “Stretching from North Dakota ($106,800) down to Texas ($120,900), housing prices were relatively cheap. California was the most expensive state on the mainland where the typical house cost an eye-popping $532,300.” (more…)

A new home used to be an option for many buyers. Not so much anymore (photo: Eric Dunlap)

In Part One of this look into the end of affordable housing in the Dallas-Fort Worth region, we discussed the giant void of quality homes under $200,000. This void will continue to move housing prices upward, force buyers to spend more than they should, and create a stagnant sales economy in our community.  Neglecting the needs for a large segment of the population will have a dramatic effect on the housing industry in all price points.

What’s The Problem?

When I first started selling homes in the early 2000s for a D/FW-based tract home builder, the homes were listed from $85,000 to $135,000. Yes, they were located in a rural area where there weren’t a lot of high paying jobs, but the point is that the developer was able to sell land to the builder who was able to offer a new home for a reasonable price.

And now that is an impossibility.

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Troy Aikman's home on Normandy in Highland Park went up in price within the first week on MLS, showing strong demand in the luxury market. (Photos: Shoot2Sell

Troy Aikman’s home on Normandy in Highland Park went up in price within the first week on MLS, showing strong demand in the luxury market. (Photos: Shoot2Sell)

I find it so interesting that just after our boy Troy Aikman upped the price on his Highland Park abode by 12 percent, CoreLogic released its HPI saying home prices are up 6.1 percent year-over-year from October 2013 and 0.5 percent from September to October 2014 nationwide.

In Texas, though, our market is seeing record gains that, while slower than last year, still show moderate growth. The Lone Star State is among four other states to post year-over-year gains with an HPI 8.7 percent higher in Oct. 2014 from a year ago including distressed sales, and 8.1 percent higher without distressed sales.

“Home price growth is moderating as we head into the late fall and is currently running at half the pace it was in the spring of 2014,” said CoreLogic deputy chief economist Sam Khater. “However, there are still pockets of strength, especially in several Texas markets, as well as Seattle, Denver, and other markets with strong economic fundamentals.”

(more…)