Built in 1966, the Athena has plenty of outdated condominiums waiting for a renovator’s sledgehammer. What’s doubly great is the units are big and the prices relatively small. As I write about new apartment buildings crowing at their 900-square-foot average unit size, I think about the older buildings.  For example, the average unit size at the Athena is 1,721 square feet.  If you figure that most balconies have been enclosed, that jumps to 1,950 square feet. Where ya gonna find that for under $300-large?

Unit 1313 is a two-bedroom, two-bathroom home with 1,770 square feet. Sure, the listing says 1,543, but that’s because DCAD is too asleep to count the enclosed balcony in their calculations. As you can tell from the photo above, most Athena balconies have been enclosed. As a balcony lover, I’ll also add that you can restore the balcony for some pretty big outdoor space. It’s not like a 1,543-square-foot, two-bedroom is tiny by any measure.

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Kyle Crews and the Allie Beth Urban Team with Allie Beth Allman right in the middle

Dear Diary,

Today I drove a Rolls Royce. Not only was it OMG big (like 20 feet long), but it rode so very unexpectedly smooth (I expected smooth, but it’s shockingly smooth). The new Phantom VIII was on display, and quite at home, at the Stoneleigh Residences in concert with the Allie Beth Urban team who’re taking over shell space sales. And you know me, I love to redesign a shell.

After my recent journeys through Southern Dallas, the city’s Market Value Analysis for affordable housing, and Housing First programs for the homeless, firing up the Phantom’s 563 horsepower, V-12 engine provided for some serious mental whiplash (the Phantom is far too polite to have caused physical whiplash).

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3525 Turtle Creek #7AB is currently listed by Elly Holder and Gretchen Brasch of Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty for $2.15 million.

When a property this chic comes across your desk, you pay attention, and such was the case when Elly Holder reached out to me for help writing the property romance for her rare-to-market offering in the iconic Howard Meyer designed 3525 Turtle Creek.

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We all know the Gold Crest on Turtle Creek.  Even though it’s just 11 stories tall, its design overshadows many taller buildings on the boulevard.  It was built in 1964 by George Dahl and it was his home for the last decades of his life.

Fresh on the market after over 34 years with the same owner is unit 1101 on the penthouse level.  While other buildings belled and whistled their penthouse levels with jumbo combined units, the 11th floor of the Gold Crest is like any other. It’s a two-bedroom, two-bathroom unit with 1,630 square feet and listed with Janet Rone of Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate for $725,000.  Don’t bother clicking on the link for pictures, there’s one and it’s of the exterior. But I do have the floor plan and my crayons …

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The axis of 8181 Douglas’s U-shaped Unit 210

Between explaining the housing crunch (here, here), flooding, new Pink Wall development, Dallas Midtown, and of course the latest in the mayor’s Fair Park friends-with-benefits giveaway, I’ve been on a tear these past few weeks. It’s time to break free with a little party, and unit 210 at 8181 Douglas definitely provides the balloons (you’ll see).

You may recall, 8181 Douglas was part of my recent high-rise buyers guide series. At just 14 units, it’s the tallest and smallest high-rise in Dallas.  If you want a whole floor it’s 7,125 square feet. Otherwise, there are two units per floor that start at a pinch over 2,000 square feet and end up at around 4,472 square feet (Note: there is one ground-floor unit that’s 1,349 square feet).

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Here’s something you don’t see every day.  A Goldilocks trio of quite different units in the same stack at the Stoneleigh.  You’ll recall, the Stoneleigh began life as a DIY building of unfinished shells. Some buyers gravitated to the complete freedom of designing their own interior without the added strife of actually designing a full home from the foundation to the roof.  Turns out that a lot of folks just aren’t interested in doing that, so the Stoneleigh announced last year that they would be finishing out some of the remaining shells to give move-in buyers something to buy.

Now, if you’re not skint of a $3.6 million budget to buy Rick Carlisle’s unit, move along, nothing for you to see here. If you’re a couple of mil short, read on …

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“Backwards” Skyline Views from The Beat Lofts

Gosh, how time flies.  It seems like only eight years weeks ago that we began this journey highlighting Dallas’ high-rise options for winged home buyers.  Now I guess it’s back to grazing through Wednesday broker open houses, snacking on steam-table tacos like Costco on a Saturday for us all. And while I am dubious this will be any readers inaugural entry to this series, I’m including the links nonetheless.

Oh so long ago, this all started with two columns discussing the merits of buildings that include utilities in their HOA dues (here, here) many of which are lower-priced buildings. A House Porn duo of Dallas’ most expensive high-rises (here, here) came next before continuing into what passes for a high-rise mid-market (here, here). These final two columns (last week) focus on the budgetary opening salvo of high-rises … well, what passes for budget friendly (ain’t very budget-y).

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View From Park Plaza Penthouse

Welcome to Part Seven of CandysDirt.com’s Dallas High-Rise Buyer’s Guide.  We’ve covered a lot of turf so far. Thirty-Three high-rises in fact. We began with two columns discussing the merits of buildings that include utilities in their HOA dues (here, here). We moved on to the house porn of Dallas’ most expensive high-rises (here, here) before continuing again to what passes for a high-rise mid-market (here, here).  These final two columns will focus on the gateway drugs of high-rise living … those most affordable for those with less stratospheric budgets.  It’s worth noting that many of the high-rises that include utilities in their HOA dues also fall within this more budget-friendly category. If you’re in this group (with me), it may be worth a peek back at those columns as you shop around.

The most glaring thing about this grouping is that fact that Dallas hasn’t built a new non-millionaire high-rise since 2002’s Travis at Knox and 2007’s Beat Lofts.  It’s equally been a decade since The Metropolitan was converted to mid-budget condos (covered in next week’s final installment).

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