Dan Piassick NFNL 7011

(Photo: 3500 Beverly Drive by Dan Piassick)

The four homes selected for the 2013 New Friends New Life Holiday Home Tour were unveiled Oct. 3, and boy, are they stunners! These amazing mansions will be featured on the nonprofit’s annual fundraiser on Sunday, Dec. 8, and you do not want to miss out!

This year’s tour spans the Park Cities and Preston Hollow, including two homes on Highland Park’s famed Beverly Drive. New Friends New Life helps women reclaim their lives from the sex industry, become self-sufficient, and rescues trafficked teen girls and sexually exploited women and their children. The tour, now in its 14th year, is the organization’s chief fundraiser.

“On behalf of the women and children we serve, we are grateful for the Home Tour chairs, homeowners, sponsors, volunteers and participants for supporting this event,” said NFNL director Katie Pedigo. “Women’s lives are transformed and families are restored because of community support which is displayed through the Holiday Home Tour.”

Dan Piassick NFNL 6926

 

(Photo: 3501 Lindenwood Ave. by Dan Piassick)

Chaired by Tanya Wiggains, this year’s Holiday Home Tour will not disappoint. Patrons can walk through and admire the homes of honorary home tour chair Gina Ginsburg and her husband Scott at 3500 Beverly Drive, Jan and Jeffrey Rich at 3827 Beverly Drive, founder of Hard Night| Good Morning skincare line D’Andra Simmons at 3501 Lindenwood Ave., and Anne and Steve Stodghill at 10401 Lennox.

Dan Piassick NFNL 6790

 

(Photo: 10401 Lennox Lane by Dan Piassick)

The homes will be open from 1 to 4 p.m. General admission tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Tickets are available at select Tom Thumb stores on November 4, by visiting www.newfriendsnewlife.org or by phone 214-965-0935.

We’ll have a few pairs of tickets to give away here at CandysDirt.com as the home tour draws closer, too. Stay tuned!

 

2340 Victory Park LaneUPDATE: I hate how slow DCAD is. Thank God for my sources. So Don Carter sold this unit to a real estate investor who lives in the W, Pierre Jean, closing 9/26. JP paid $1.2 because Carter basically said to him, take it, get rid of it. But of course it’s been updated and decked out to the nines, and there are not many of these multi-level units left. Former Cowboys player Kenneth Hamlin has the same unit on floor 23.

First he unloaded his huge house in University Park. Now the man who basically birthed and nurtured the Dallas Mavericks into the sixth most valuable basketball team in the U.S. is selling sold his to-die-for North West Tower W condo of many levels. This is a giant custom unit, just shy of 4,000 square feet with two bedrooms, three full baths and one half as powder room on the 27th floor. 2340 Victory Park Lane hall 2430 Victory Park Lane den 2430 Victory Park Lane kit#2704 2430 Victory Park dining 2430 Victory Park bfastAs an end unit, you get fantastic premium panoramic views of Dallas from floor to ceiling windows and never have to worry about drapes, even in the bathtub! (If you do, though, there are electric shades at the push of a button.) There are limestone floors, sleek marble counters, two terraces and a master suite the size of California with more than ample closet space.DonCARTER2-articleLarge

Photo by Donna McWilliam/Associated Press

The kitchen is long, open and central, with a large island, gas cook top, Sub Zero and double ovens. Cook yourself up a storm, bring in Kent Rathburn, or call down for the W’s still strong, always dependable Whatever Whenever service. Don Carter has bought up a penthouse at the Stoneleigh Residences, which he is finishing out when he and wife Linda Jo are not sailing on their 41 foot power boat in the Gulf. He also owns another W unit in this building on the 22nd floor that is only 1700 square feet.2430 Victory Park master bath1 2430 Victory master bath 2 2340 Victory Park Lane hall 2340 Victory Park Lane 2430 Victory Park master 2430 Victory park guest 2430 Victory Park balcony

It’s just enough space to hang out before and after a game, which Carter seldom misses in his signature cowboy hat. He retains a 4% ownership in the Mavericks team, Mark Cuban is majority owner. This unit is listed with Rogers Healy’s Steve Rigley at $2,500,000.

I love how this is totally unlike his home on University. It’s really a steal! Well, maybe…

618 N. Brookside Home of the Week

I have driven down this street, Brookside, off LaVista, so many times on my way to Hollywood Heights/Santa Monica where my daughter now lives. Every time I marvel at how pretty Brookside is, and how the homes on one side all back up to the Lakewood Country Club. What a perfect place to live — walking distance to Lakewood Shopping Center, Whole Foods, and of course a whole country club golf course in your back-yard.

Then, eureka, a month ago, I see this gorgeous, neat as a pin and spiffy Tudor revival that has a for sale sign in front on the country club side! It is listed by John and Debbie Brosius, Allie Beth Allman & Associates, Debbie being John’s wife, and John being the super star agent who brought a buyer to my home years ago. Then I look this house up and — quick someone hide my checkbook!

618 Brookside is now under one million dollars!

618 N. Brookside Entry 618 N. Brookside Living618 N. Brookside Dining 618 N. Brookside Kitchen 618 Brookside KIT3618 N. Brookside DenBuilt in 1928,  the 3486 square foot home is perched on a bit of a hill, not a climb, enough to poise it majestically. Landscaping is luscious and mature on a third-acre lot(.38) and the home has been beautifully updated inside with classical touches: the walls and ceilings are still thickly textured plaster, and yes, those are original stained glass windows. There are beautiful moldings, arched windows, nooks, crannies, hardwoods, leaded glass doors, slate floors, an original  Potter Ironworks stair rail, and a rookwood pottery fireplace. You get four bedrooms, three and a half baths, formals, , secluded master with sitting room, spa bath with bidet, sunroom, an outdoor pergola with a beautiful grill built into a round, stone island structure, a roman swimming pool and detached garage with 600 square feet of guest quarters over.

618 N. Brookside Master 618 N. Brookside Master Bath 618 N. Brookside PoolhousePlease note that subtracting the guest quarters square footage leaves the home at 2886 square feet — essentially  a three bedroom, two and a half bath house with a rear guest quarters. But really, who needs more?

John and Debbie have it listed for $985,000. Was listed a year ago for $975,000, you know, different market. Then it went back on July 5 at $1,025,000. I’d say we are getting closer to perfection… and my checkbook…  and a loan from Inwood Mortgage right now!618 Brookside grill 618 Brookside guest house618 N. Brookside Backyard 618 N. Brookside Patio

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Word comes that Troy Aikman’s new abode on Normandy has a fabulous landscape designed and installed by none other than Harold Leidner Landscape Architects, our CandysDirt.com preferred landscape designer. What’s even more interesting is that this is Aikman’s third home with a Harold Leidner-designed landscape! The first two were custom jobs commissioned by Troy, and the third is the incredible Tatum Brown-built, Clint Pearson, Architect | Symmetry Architects designed abode he just bought.

Troy sure does have good taste, right? We think so, too. I mean, after a long, illustrious career spent on a grass-covered field, you have to know a little something about landscaping, so of course he would choose the creme de la creme in all things green.

So, what do the outdoor areas at his former digs on Highland Drive and his new abode on Normandy have in common? Lush, sculpted European-style hedges and seasonal plantings in front, for sure!

 

4939 Manson Court ext 2

When my inlaws built their custom home, they chose a three-car garage so that they could park both of their cars indoors and have an extra area for my father-in-law’s wood shop. His new HOA didn’t allow sheds and out-buildings, so if he wanted to have a place for power tools a la Tim Taylor, he had to have a third garage space.

That’s what I imagine most people who have multiple garage spaces would use that additional space for — hobbies and a man cave, perhaps. But would you make the leap between a two- or three-car garage to a four-car garage? Most people won’t according to a poll by Coldwell Banker:

Interestingly, results of an informal poll on optimal parking spaces were mixed, but most respondents seemed less than keen on additional garage space. Half of those asked – buyers with different lifestyles and from different locations looking at a variety of price ranges and areas – said that they would not want more than three spaces for vehicles. In fact, two was the preferred number. Asked about more spaces, the common answer was “no need.”

One 30-something entrepreneur who participated in the poll unequivocally responded in the negative, saying that extra garage spaces “would just collect junk.” Several respondents thought money would be better spent on other amenities, and several suggested garden sheds or portable storage buildings in the backyard as alternatives for additional storage space. Even car lovers thought that a four-car garage space might encourage them to buy another collector’s car, which was viewed as a negative for a lot of reasons, domestic harmony included!

I tend to agree about additional space often attracting more junk. That’s the case with our garage right now. But even if I had a four-plus-car garage like Platinum Series Homes-built  4939 Manson Court (above), I would probably just fill it with all the fun toys I could find. Boat? ATVs? Bicycles? They all sound like fun!

What about you? Would you opt for the extra space? Or is your garage like Baby Bear’s porridge — just right?

Nasher roofGreg Greene, one of the developers of Museum Tower, has told Candace Carlisle at the Dallas Business Journal that “ownership wants to financially step up to fix the tower’s glare inside the galleries at the Nasher Sculpture Center.” But then he added, agreeing on a solution could take more time. And it looks as though that solution is the $5 million we told you last week that MT has offered to completely change out the Nasher’s roof. And also, note that Greene used the term “air space”:

“It’s an unfortunate set of circumstances, but those oculi are pointed right at our air space,” Greg Greene, a development partner at Dallas-based Turtle Creek Holdings Inc. told the Dallas Business Journal Tuesday during an exclusive tour of the property. “They were here first, but they don’t have the right to take someone’s air space,” Greene told me (Candace Carlisle). “Why isn’t theDallas Museum of Art complaining or anyone else complaining? Because they have a solid roof and they don’t have oculi pointed at our air space. That’s the problem and that’s what needs to be fixed.”

Recall Museum Tower officials presented a solution to foot the bill to reconfigure the oculi on the Nasher roof to point away from the new high-rise, which would essentially return the lighting in the Nasher to pre-Museum Tower conditions.Nasher rooftop

I caught up with Dallas agent Scott Deakins, who has sold a lot of Arts District condos, for his take on Museum Tower’s generous proposal, a proposal Greene told the DBJ would reduce profitability of the project somewhat.

CD: So Scott, you’ve been out of town, and you come back in and hear the news about Museum Tower’s offer to re-do essentially the Nasher’s roof. Were you surprised?

SD: It’s good to be back.  Paris says hi, btw!  No, I’m not surprised, this situation gets dumb and dumber. All you can do is roll your eyes.  Last year they asked the Nasher to grow taller trees ( to offset the glare) and now they want to replace the roof, which in itself is a significant architectural detail.  Give me a break.

CD: I’m particularly interested in your views since you have sold so many homes in the Arts District, and you live there (right?) This doesn’t seem reasonable to you? Why not?

SD: Yes, I live in the Arts District and no, it is not reasonable for a variety of reasons; why punish the victim in all of this?  The Nasher didn’t ask for this.

Also, this is not just hurting the museum part of the Nasher-what about the loss of the landscape in the sculpture garden?  What about the loss of the James Turrell Skyspace installation (see below).  This problem also affects Klyde Warren Park, drivers on Woodall Freeway. I have calls all the time from clients at One Arts complaining about the glare from the building from the morning (eastern) sun.  This is a 360 degree problem.

CD: You told me that a recent article in the New York Times by Wil Hylton almost mourned for Skyspace – and that everyone who wants to understand the function of light should read this: “One of my favorite Turrell pieces is the Skyspace “Tending (Blue),” which is inside a small stone building behind the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. To reach the piece, you pass through a Renzo Piano-designed building filled with northern light, then you cross the clean, clear lines of a landscape by Peter Walker. By the time you enter the Skyspace, the city of Dallas is long forgotten. I once lost the better part of a day inside, staring up as clouds lofted and flattened against the ceiling. But last year, a mirrored skyscraper went up nearby, reflecting glare into the building, killing plants in the garden and looming into view of the Skyspace. The museum had to close it.

SD: Yes! I wanted your followers, real estate developers and consumers, to see the New York Times piece because of the significant loss of the much loved James Turrell Skyspace thanks to the intrusion of Museum Tower.  The loss is permanent! Also, what are readers of the Times all over the world going to take away from this article about Dallas – that selling condos is more important than our culture and love of the arts? My point is MT is hurting ALL aspects of the Nasher, not just the building.

CD: But the building is there, and it was approved by the City, and those homes need to be sold.

SD: You’re right, the condos do need to be sold for the good of the Arts District and the city.  It has been my experience that people choose to live in the Arts District because of their love of surroundings.  Right now Museum Tower does not love its surroundings.  Five sales in three years is hardly something to beat your chest about.  Museum Tower is a fine building and there is a huge market for the condos, from  local as well as international buyers.  Sales are not going to increase until MT does something pro-actively about this. The problem has always been the skin of the building.

When Graham Greene sold the land to the original MT developers it was with the understanding that any structure built on the site would have height restrictions and would not use reflective glass.  Graham is an architect and as such thinks about things like light and the surroundings.  I can’t imagine the powers that be at MT didn’t know this was going to be a problem

CD: So what is a solution ?

SD: The solutions are expensive for sure.  But as it stands this 200+ million dollar building is completed and sitting mostly empty.  For a moment Museum Tower need to not think about commerce and commissions but instead think about what is good for the city it occupies. It is something that we try and teach our children at a very young age-do the right thing! Throwing in the golden rule wouldn’t hurt either.

Nasher roofGreg Greene, one of the developers of Museum Tower, has told Candace Carlisle at the Dallas Business Journal that “ownership wants to financially step up to fix the tower’s glare inside the galleries at the Nasher Sculpture Center.” But then he added, agreeing on a solution could take more time. And it looks as though that solution is the $5 million we told you last week that MT has offered to completely change out the Nasher’s roof. And also, note that Greene used the term “air space”:

“It’s an unfortunate set of circumstances, but those oculi are pointed right at our air space,” Greg Greene, a development partner at Dallas-based Turtle Creek Holdings Inc. told the Dallas Business Journal Tuesday during an exclusive tour of the property. “They were here first, but they don’t have the right to take someone’s air space,” Greene told me (Candace Carlisle). “Why isn’t theDallas Museum of Art complaining or anyone else complaining? Because they have a solid roof and they don’t have oculi pointed at our air space. That’s the problem and that’s what needs to be fixed.”

Recall Museum Tower officials presented a solution to foot the bill to reconfigure the oculi on the Nasher roof to point away from the new high-rise, which would essentially return the lighting in the Nasher to pre-Museum Tower conditions.Nasher rooftop

I caught up with Dallas agent Scott Deakins, who has sold a lot of Arts District condos, for his take on Museum Tower’s generous proposal, a proposal Greene told the DBJ would reduce profitability of the project somewhat.

CD: So Scott, you’ve been out of town, and you come back in and hear the news about Museum Tower’s offer to re-do essentially the Nasher’s roof. Were you surprised?

SD: It’s good to be back.  Paris says hi, btw!  No, I’m not surprised, this situation gets dumb and dumber. All you can do is roll your eyes.  Last year they asked the Nasher to grow taller trees ( to offset the glare) and now they want to replace the roof, which in itself is a significant architectural detail.  Give me a break.

CD: I’m particularly interested in your views since you have sold so many homes in the Arts District, and you live there (right?) This doesn’t seem reasonable to you? Why not?

SD: Yes, I live in the Arts District and no, it is not reasonable for a variety of reasons; why punish the victim in all of this?  The Nasher didn’t ask for this.

Also, this is not just hurting the museum part of the Nasher-what about the loss of the landscape in the sculpture garden?  What about the loss of the James Turrell Skyspace installation (see below).  This problem also affects Klyde Warren Park, drivers on Woodall Freeway. I have calls all the time from clients at One Arts complaining about the glare from the building from the morning (eastern) sun.  This is a 360 degree problem.

CD: You told me that a recent article in the New York Times by Wil Hylton almost mourned for Skyspace – and that everyone who wants to understand the function of light should read this: “One of my favorite Turrell pieces is the Skyspace “Tending (Blue),” which is inside a small stone building behind the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. To reach the piece, you pass through a Renzo Piano-designed building filled with northern light, then you cross the clean, clear lines of a landscape by Peter Walker. By the time you enter the Skyspace, the city of Dallas is long forgotten. I once lost the better part of a day inside, staring up as clouds lofted and flattened against the ceiling. But last year, a mirrored skyscraper went up nearby, reflecting glare into the building, killing plants in the garden and looming into view of the Skyspace. The museum had to close it.

SD: Yes! I wanted your followers, real estate developers and consumers, to see the New York Times piece because of the significant loss of the much loved James Turrell Skyspace thanks to the intrusion of Museum Tower.  The loss is permanent! Also, what are readers of the Times all over the world going to take away from this article about Dallas – that selling condos is more important than our culture and love of the arts? My point is MT is hurting ALL aspects of the Nasher, not just the building.

CD: But the building is there, and it was approved by the City, and those homes need to be sold.

SD: You’re right, the condos do need to be sold for the good of the Arts District and the city.  It has been my experience that people choose to live in the Arts District because of their love of surroundings.  Right now Museum Tower does not love its surroundings.  Five sales in three years is hardly something to beat your chest about.  Museum Tower is a fine building and there is a huge market for the condos, from  local as well as international buyers.  Sales are not going to increase until MT does something pro-actively about this. The problem has always been the skin of the building.

When Graham Greene sold the land to the original MT developers it was with the understanding that any structure built on the site would have height restrictions and would not use reflective glass.  Graham is an architect and as such thinks about things like light and the surroundings.  I can’t imagine the powers that be at MT didn’t know this was going to be a problem

CD: So what is a solution ?

SD: The solutions are expensive for sure.  But as it stands this 200+ million dollar building is completed and sitting mostly empty.  For a moment Museum Tower need to not think about commerce and commissions but instead think about what is good for the city it occupies. It is something that we try and teach our children at a very young age-do the right thing! Throwing in the golden rule wouldn’t hurt either.

timthumb

Hunter Dehn is modest about his success in real estate. With the Platinum Series Realty brand, he’s marketed some of the most expensive listings in Dallas, including 4939 Manson Court. With Mark Molthan’s Platinum Series Homes, these two are building and selling some of the most sought-after luxury properties in Dallas.

Of course, growing up in Preston Hollow surely helps understand the ins and outs of the area, and gives Dehn a lot of leverage in a luxury market where inventory is as scarce as it is competitive.

What do we love best about Dehn? Definitely his ambition!

You can find out more about Hunter Dehn and Platinum Series Realty on his website.

CandysDirt.com: Where are you from?

Hunter Dehn: I grew up on Waggoner Drive in Preston Hollow.

CD:How did you get into real estate?

Dehn: I bought my first rental property at the age of 19, it was on Richmond Ave. in Lakewood.

CD: The Platinum Series Realty brand has really taken off. How do you balance the needs of a growing business with family life?

Dehn: I’ve found that 6 hours of sleep is more than enough or I usually take at least one weekend a month off to go to our ranch as a family.

Hunter Dehn and Family

CD: Where is home for you in Dallas?

Dehn: I’m building on Norway near St. Marks.

CD: What’s your favorite ‘hood in Dallas and why?

Dehn: Preston Hollow, hands down; big lots, great trees, convenient, what’s not to love!

CD: What was your best/highest sale?

Dehn: I currently have a home listed in the Strait Lane neighborhood for $29,995,000.

CD: Likewise, what was the hardest deal you’ve ever done?

Dehn: Every deal seems to have its own unique set of challenges, but like they say if it was easy, everyone would be doing it.

CD: How quickly have you ever turned a house?

Dehn: It depends upon how you define that. I have one that I closed in 2 hours.

CD: How much did you sell last year?

Dehn: A little over $20 million.

CD: What have you learned about selling that makes you so successful?

Dehn: I try to treat everyone like I would a close personal friend.

CD: If you ever change careers for an encore you’ll…

Dehn: Be a farmer or NASCAR driver (my wife thinks I practice for this on the Tollway)

CD: Do you have a second home? If so, where?

Dehn: We have a ranch just outside Sherman near the Red River. It is my favorite place to escape to.