Josh Nimmo’s Incredible Architectural Conception for Crestfield Place

Crestfield Place debuts tomorrow evening, as we have told you, beginning at 4:30 p.m. over at 2204 Moser in the East Village. This is Cobalt Homes’ second foray into high end, dense living townhomes in urban infill. I caught up with the architect, Josh Nimmo, because I am giddy with delight over the project and the fact that you can now buy a beautiful, designer-label townhome in Dallas for under $600,000.

Let me put it to you this way: Josh Nimmo is the kind of architect who does multi-million dollars homes, like the one right next to me. While with famed architect Lionel Morrison FAIA, he worked on the W Dallas Residences, One Arts Plaza Residences, that famous Northaven Residence, and LEED Gold Certified International Business Park Phase 15.

That’s why I see Crestfield Place as so much more than another great East Village option: it is proof that developers can churn out a middle-cost project of great design without breaking the bank! 

CD: Josh, what was the single most gutsy move attached to this project?

JN: It was very bold of Cobalt to put the living on the third floor, rather than the second (as you see in most townhomes). When living areas are on the second floor, you don’t feel connected to an outdoor space either above or below. We wanted to create some kind of terrace space off the living space with a clear connection to what was above. Psychologically, when you see the stairs on the balcony, you want to go up and check it out. Plus adding the dumbwaiters was brilliant on their part, to make living on various levels so much easier.

CD: You do! I did, anyhow. tell me how you achieved so dang much natural light in those homes, it’s out of control amazing.

JN: We wanted to create was some drama, something that leads you up the staircase inside. The light from the vertical skylight on the roof floods the entire stairwell with sunlight, and helps make the ascent a little more interesting. And when you are looking in that direction, there is a hint that something else is going on upstairs. The light is always a reminder to go up the stairs.

CD: Could be a metaphor for life. OK, how did you achieve that incredible open feeling in the kitchen-dining area?

JN: We eliminated upper cabinets over the kitchen sink, so the counter almost becomes part of the stair-rail coming up. Plus it seems there are almost two islands in the kitchen. Of course, we have plenty of cabinet storage in the back Butler’s pantry. We also provided an actual breakfast bar for dedicated dining space beside the dining area.

CD: You have made the entire space seem so much larger than the actual square footage, which is plenty, actually. Especially on the bedroom level.

JN: Yes, the hall and master have the floor-to-ceiling windows, with almost a faux balcony, and a privacy screen, all of which make the spaces seem much larger.