A. Quincy Jones Gem in Ridglea Restored, Restaged, and Revisited

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A. Quincy JonesA. Quincy Jones’ architectural masterpiece at 4167 Charron Lane is likely Fort Worth’s most beautiful and storied orphan. Houses by the venerated modernist architect are so sought after in his native Los Angles, that they are snapped up by the rich and famous as soon as they hit the market. Jennifer Aniston paid $22 million for hers. Courtney Cox lives in one. Seasoned star flipper, Ellen Degeneres banked 15 million dollars, selling her A. Quincy Jones-designed house, to Napster founder Sean Parker for a staggering 55 million dollars, after holding it for less than one year .

A. Quincy Jones
Mrs. Alfred Steele (Joan Crawford) in her William Haines decorated Manhattan Apartment. Feud fans will notice her signature plastic slip covers.

Back in Fort Worth, this A. Quincy Jones gem has enjoyed a glamorous past and faced an uncertain future. Built in 1953 by oil man Andrew Fuller, who had ties to Los Angeles, the home once hosted Hollywood luminaries like Jimmy Stewart and Joan Crawford. Joan would have felt perfectly comfortable here with an interior executed by her own designer and friend, Billy Haines, whose career she helped launch. Amon Carter III, son of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram publisher and grandson of the legendary mayor, also lived here.

A. Quincy Jones

More recently, the house faced a precarious fate. Standing unoccupied for four years, under bank trusteeship,  the house fell into disrepair. Historic Fort Worth put it on their endangered list in 2012 when it faced near certain demolition. It found a buyer in that year willing to repair the roof, restore woodwork damaged by water, and to install a modern, efficient, HVAC system.

A. Quincy Jones

And, there is so much which is unique and beautiful to revel in here, composed as it is, of an original architectural vocabulary of varied geometrically shaped spaces, including circles, trapezoids, and even rhombuses. In the public rooms, ceilings soar to a celestial 20 feet.

A. Quincy Jones

Materials are nothing short of luxurious. Exquisite, walnut, parquetry floors have been brought back to their original glory. A rich repertoire of stone adds texture to the composition. Storage is carved out, wherever possible, from the walls hiding behind modular doors.

A. Quincy Jones

 

A.Quincy Jones

A small study features a unique built-in desk, which floats into the room.

A. Quincy Jones

The spacious master bedroom has abundant storage and a fireplace. Floor-to-ceiling windows frame views of the extensive grounds.

A. Quincy Jones

Would anyone contemplate altering this near-perfect master bath? The understated yet rich wood work and cabinetry remind me of the best interior fittings of luxury retailer Barney’s.

A. Quincy Jones

Equally refreshing is the vast, all-white kitchen. Even the mega Viking range is enameled white — so much easier to maintain than brushed stainless.

A. Quincy Jones

Exterior courts and hardscape are rife with details creating unique vignettes. This calming fountain is an enchanting piece of outdoor sculpture.

A. Quincy Jones

Stone-faced pillars with masonry planter boxes march down the back of the structure in a forceful rhythm.

A. Quincy Jones

Once occupying over 17 acres in Ridglea, the house now sits on two and one half acres. There is a 50-foot pool in back.

Now returning to our story. The house Andrew Fuller built at 4167 Charron Lane has been on and off the market for the last four years, failing, once again, to find a buyer — baffling, given the current craze for midcentury modern — in this instance, classic modern, because it looks so now. And speaking of now, current construction costs of houses of this caliber would run to at least $800 per square foot. At $1.35 million, the 6,012-square-foot house clocks in at a mere $225. Add in the additional 1,500 square feet taken from the former garage, a huge two-and-one-half-acre city lot, and this four-bedroom, four-and-one-half-bath house begins to look like a bargain, conservatively priced at land value.

A. Quincy JonesThe house has just been staged by AЯRANGE with new photography to follow, which may do the trick. Ms. Aniston: would you consider selling your LA spread, pocketing $20 million, and commuting to work from Panther City?

Listing agent Clay Brants of Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s is offering 4167 Charron Lane for $1.35 million.

Eric Prokesh is an interior designer whose work has appeared on HGTV, and in books and publications including D Home, Southern Accents, House Beautiful, and House and Garden. In January 2005, HG named Eric one of the 50 tastemakers in America and D Home has included him as one of Dallas’ Best Designers for 10 years. Having lived most of his life in Dallas, he now calls Fort Worth home and is one of our experts on beautiful Fort Worth Dirt.

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Eric Prokesh

Eric Prokesh is an interior designer whose work has appeared on HGTV, in books and publications including DHome, Southern Accents, House Beautiful, and House and Garden. In January 2005, HG named Eric one of the 50 tastemakers in America and DHome has included him as one of Dallas’ Best Designers for 10 years. Having lived most of his life in Dallas, he now calls Fort Worth home and is one of our experts on beautiful Fort Worth Dirt.

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Comments

  1. Cody Farris says

    One of the most interesting homes I’ve seen in a long time, and from what I can tell, it needs an owner who will keep intact! Beautiful property. Especially love the inlaid wood flooring.

  2. Michael Jordan says

    The home is incredible. The restoration was top notch. My only issue with the home is I would go broke trying to maintain the current quality. This house is definitely undervalued for obvious reasons. I can’t wait for the perfect buyer who will love and maintain this home to its current standards.

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