Dallas Attorney Tom Luce Will Mediate Nasher/Museum Tower Fracas

Tom Luce, managing director and founding partner of Dallas law firm Hughes & Luce, has agreed to be the go-between as the Nasher Sculpture Center and Museum Tower look to find a solution to their very, very hot problem.

According to KERA’s Art+Seek blog, the Dallas Police and Fire Pension Fund, which owns the $200M Museum Tower, asked Luce to come on board. Here’s what Luce said:

“The Nasher Sculpture Center and the Museum Tower and the developers have jointly asked me to serve as facilitator to resolve all the open issues between the parties.  And they have affirmed to each other and to me that they want to resolve these issues as quickly as possible.  They have asked to help them do that and I’m pleased to undertake the mission.”

Italian architect Renzo Piano designed the very sensitive roof of the Nasher Sculpture Center.

If you’ve already read Tim Rogers’ May D Magazine cover story, you’ll know that this isn’t the first time that the Nasher and Museum Tower have tried to sort out their differences. Here’s how Rogers retells it:

At some point, Strick had had enough. He pushed back his chair and stood up. “As far as we’re concerned, you guys created the problem,” he said. Strick is a soft-spoken man of enormous restraint. He’d clearly hit the breaking point. “It’s your problem to fix. We’re not going to touch our building. We’re not going to study a solution on our side. That’s the end of the discussion.”

Rogers offers some follow-up to the story, in which Nasher architect Renzo Piano says he’ll make some trouble for Museum Tower if they don’t do something to rectify the impact on his creation.

Here’s what I want to know: What do you think is the best solution to the problem? Do you think Piano could win if this goes to court?

0 Comment

  • It seems to me that a simple solution would be to tint the windows of Museum Tower. Surely there exists a less reflective film covering for glass that would solve the problem, maintain the shape of the building, and eliminate the harmful glare. What's the big deal to the Museum Tower people?

  • It seems to me that a simple solution would be to tint the windows of Museum Tower. Surely there exists a less reflective film covering for glass that would solve the problem, maintain the shape of the building, and eliminate the harmful glare. What's the big deal to the Museum Tower people?

  • This is the way civilized people solve problems, and it is interesting to note the decision was made last MONDAY, before D's story came out. I had the honor of working for Tom Luce with Lisa LeMaster when he ran for governor in 1990 — against Clayton Williams, yikes! — and he is a champion of compromise. Because the whole premise of Museum Tower is based on it's location to and connection with the arts district, it is also in the developers' best interests to solve this issue. I would look to E and O insurance policies for the extra funds it will take to cure it. Museum Tower is not the only high rise that has had refractory issues…

  • mm

    This is the way civilized people solve problems, and it is interesting to note the decision was made last MONDAY, before D's story came out. I had the honor of working for Tom Luce with Lisa LeMaster when he ran for governor in 1990 — against Clayton Williams, yikes! — and he is a champion of compromise. Because the whole premise of Museum Tower is based on it's location to and connection with the arts district, it is also in the developers' best interests to solve this issue. I would look to E and O insurance policies for the extra funds it will take to cure it. Museum Tower is not the only high rise that has had refractory issues…

  • @CliffBED: the cost. Possibly altering the look.

  • mm

    @CliffBED: the cost. Possibly altering the look.

  • Darn! I was hoping that this would be the chosen mediator

    http://www.usanetwork.com/series/fairlylegal/index.html

  • Darn! I was hoping that this would be the chosen mediator

    http://www.usanetwork.com/series/fairlylegal/index.html

  • Okay here's a dumb question. I know that in some cities architects/builders of major downtown buildings conduct wind studies to see how their building will affect the wind in the area.

    did no one consider doing a study or analysis of what would happen when the sun's ray hit Museum Tower? or do they design buildings in isolation

  • Okay here's a dumb question. I know that in some cities architects/builders of major downtown buildings conduct wind studies to see how their building will affect the wind in the area.

    did no one consider doing a study or analysis of what would happen when the sun's ray hit Museum Tower? or do they design buildings in isolation