Builder Brian Gream and architect Scott Marek are the talented duo behind our Inwood Home of the Week at 60 Vanguard Way, a magnificent modern masterpiece in Urban Reserve. Urban Reserve is one of those neighborhoods that make you look at your significant other and say “Honey, I don’t think we’re in Texas anymore.” But, boy howdy are you. (more…)

dallas open houses

The modern masterpiece at 84 Vanguard Way is a thing of beauty, and it’s one of our five featured open houses this week.

Every week, hundreds of homes get put on the market in Dallas. We scour the listings for the best open houses to feature in the CandysDirt Open Houses of the Week column.

This week, we’ve found five fabulous properties you’ll love, from a contemporary marvel in Central Dallas’ Urban Reserve that’s LEED-certified and a stunning Munger Place Craftsman, to a stylish soft contemporary four-story condo, and more. Let us know what you think of our choices, and if you know of any we should feature next week!

 

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Urban Reseve 14 Vanguard Way

Urban Reserve is where the cool kids live — there’s no doubt about it. You have to have a certain aesthetic and sensibility to appreciate what this master-planned, sustainable, modern oasis is all about. It’s not surprising that in a neighborhood of 50 homes spread over 13 acres you’ll find seven architects, artists, and interior designers — you know, the cool kids.

Now you can join them (and be cool, too) because 14 Vanguard Way, our Inwood National Bank Home of the Week, has just been listed by Joseph Garcia of Gharbieh + Associates for $904,900. Architect Brent Brown designed the 3,008-square-foot, three-bedroom, three-bathroom home. Brown is a director with BC Workshop and the founding director of the city of Dallas’ CityDesign Studio. And he’s won more awards than we have room to write about.

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This cool iron sculpture is actually a fire pit! (Photos: Rick Davis/FLUX Media Productions)

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The metal exterior and bright orange boxes might make you think that this home at 16 Vanguard Way is a super-industrial, sterile design inside. Nothing could be further from the truth, actually.

This home, with its corrugated metal, wall of glass doors, and cantilevered shape designed by A. GRUPPO Architects will turn your conceptions of modern architecture on its head. And it’s just one of the five incredible homes on the Lake Highlands Area Early Childhood PTA Home Tour.

The modern home at 16 Vanguard Way is one of two Urban Reserve, with the second one being the Russell Buchanan-designed 29 Vanguard Way. Buchanan is known for his innovative use of industrial materials, and I’m sure this big red box will be full of surprises.

You can check these two beauties out on April 9 from 9 a.m.to noon and then head out to the Turtle Creek Association Tour of Homes, which starts at 1 p.m.

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dallas open house listings

The modern marvel at 47 Vanguard Way in Urban Reserve is one of our five featured open houses this week.

Every Thursday, we pick five hot North Texas properties with our CandysDirt Open Houses of the Week column.

This week, our houses range in price from $474,700 to $899,999. We’ve picked some impressive properties, from a rare 1920’s Craftsman in East Dallas’ Greenland Hills, to a magazine-worthy Midcentury in Hillside. Let us know what you think of our choices, and if you know of any we should feature next week!

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Jacotte house

All photos: Jeff Baker

Ten years ago, Catherine Horsey fell in love with a house.

Jacotte House

Catherine Horsey

Having spent seven years at the helm of Preservation Dallas, and recently returned to Dallas to work on the sustainable neighborhood Urban Reserve, Horsey saw an article on the house at 3216 Jacotte Cir. and was immediately smitten.

This home is significant in Dallas because it was Howard Meyer’s first modernist house, built in 1937. Meyer is one of Dallas’ first and most accomplished modern architects, known for designing Temple Emanu-El, one of the most distinguished works of contemporary architecture in Texas built during the 1950s; the Lipshy-Clark House at 5381 Nakoma Dr., one of the finest international modernist houses in Texas; and 3525 Turtle Creek Blvd., considered the most fully realized and successful modernist apartment building in Texas, perhaps in America.

Horsey saw this home’s rehabilitation as a great opportunity to showcase how historic preservation and green building practices could work hand-in-hand, and spent a year updating the entire house.

With the help of the original plans, photographs from a 1940 Architectural Record article, and conversations with Eugene K. Sanger, Sr., for whom the house was designed, Horsey restored its character-defining elements and adapted it for resource-efficient modern living.

“The longer I have lived in this house, the more I have loved it—that must be one of the definitions of good architecture,” Horsey said. “What I love about the house is the light—so many large windows that open out to the nearly 17,000-square-foot yard, and the very low utility costs. Howard Meyer really knew what he was doing when he designed this house for the Texas climate.”

This is a three bedroom, four bathroom house, with 2,034 square feet. Horsey is selling it herself for $739,000.

“It’s for sale by owner right now, because I’m going to do my best to keep it from falling into the wrong hands,” she said.

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Chris-Craft-House

The Chris Craft House, designed by architect Vince Snyder, at 22 Vanguard Way in Urban Reserve, the brainchild of Dallas developer Diane Cheatham.

Dallas developer Diane Cheatham is a dedicated modernist and committed environmentalist.

As CEO of Urban Edge Developers, Ltd., Cheatham has brought those values to her work in multiple settings, from small infill condos and townhomes that won multiple design awards, to her masterpiece at Urban Reserve, a signature modern neighborhood that uses sustainable features creatively.

Diane Cheatham

Diane Cheatham

It’s a trend she’s happy to say is showing up more in North Texas.

“I see more developers and builders responding to consumer demand by building modern and green,” Cheatham said. “The style is much more accepted in Dallas now, and a growing segment of homebuyers are interested in green building and a more modern aesthetic. I’d like to see more developers thinking out of the box, providing more options at all price levels.”

Cheatham envisions and creates enclaves that are both eco-friendly and people-friendly. At Urban Reserve, for example, a reservoir that gets neighborhood run-off water is used to irrigate common spaces and individual lawns. Every house is required to have LEED-H certification. Her own house at 1 Vanguard Way, which she shares with her husband Chuck, has geothermal heating and cooling, energy-saving windows, and an 18,000-gallon cistern that collects rain runoff from the roof. Homeowners in the community are encouraged “not to do the standard Dallas fences,” and many of the homes feature indoor-outdoor living spaces that encourage interaction with neighbors and passers-by.

These efforts have not gone unnoticed. Urban Reserve has earned multiple recognition and awards, like the 2007 Dallas AIA Excellence in Sustainable Design, 2007 CLIDE Award (Celebrating Leadership in Development Excellence), and a 2009 award from Eco-Structure Magazine, where Urban Reserve was distinguished as one of seven innovative projects.

All this took rule-breaking by Cheatham as she customized street widths to slow traffic, created rain gardens and retention ponds, and made the basic infrastructure and layout of the development conducive to her overall vision.

“It’s taken longer than expected, but there are only six lots of the 50 left and work is proceeding on six homes with eight more in various stages of design,” she said. “The realization of Urban Reserve has been the hardest [of all my projects], and as it nears completion, it is also the most satisfying. Being out there on the cutting edge proved to be more complicated than I anticipated.”

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Thad Reeves

The Bley Sleeping House in San Marcos. Photo: Craig Kuhner

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Thad Reeves, AIA, is a co-founder of A.GRUPPO Architects, an office positioned as a vehicle for collaboration between themselves and other designers, architects, fabricators, and most importantly, clients.

He received his Masters of Architecture from the University of Texas at Arlington in 1997. During this time, he studied in Spain and traveled widely in Europe. His interest in the influence of historic European architecture on contemporary design has led him on numerous architectural pilgrimages throughout Western and Central Europe, Australia, and the U.S.

Thad Reeves, AIA

Thad Reeves

After graduating, Reeves began his career with RTKL Associates in Dallas, where he was part of both local and international award-winning projects. He later worked with Oglesby Greene Architects, where he honed his skills on well-crafted, smaller-scale projects.

In 2003, Reeves went entrepreneurial, helping to form the offices of Thomas Krahenbuhl and Truett Roberts Architects, continuing to work on commercial and residential projects at all phases of the design process.

It was in 2005 that Reeves began teaching at his alma mater, UT Arlington, where he taught for ten years (he is currently taking a break, as his business has really taken off). This was also when he co-founded A. GRUPPO.

CandysDirt: You have an interest in the influence of European architecture on contemporary design. How do you see that happening—or not—in Dallas?

Thad Reeves: My interest in European architecture, both historic and contemporary, has to do more with ideas and where they come from. In Europe, they’ve been dealing with buildings in the urban context for far longer than we have. I think there is a lot to learn from how the Europeans approach issues of density, transportation, and public space.

I’ve realized that I’m not as excited about a lot of new buildings. Many are very nicely done, but lack something that I haven’t quit identified yet. A few years ago in New York, I realized there were a lot more things to learn from how someone (probably not an architect) resolved a gate or connection between two buildings rather pragmatically than something considered “high design.” Ideas are all around us, so it’s fun to catalog those and see where they will pop up in our work.

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