Most Endangered Historic Places in Dallas

Preservation Dallas today held a conference to announce their 2016 most endangered listoric places in Dallas list. Photo: Irene Allender

“Historic preservation is the dynamic and deliberate process through which we decide what to keep from the present for the future, and then working to keep it.” —W. Brown Morton

Many historic buildings in Dallas face an uncertain future. Today, Preservation Dallas held a press conference to announce their 2016 “Most Endangered Historic Places in Dallas” list.

These are properties too important to lose, for their historic integrity to be diminished, or for the loss of their ability to be used to their full potential, said David Preziosi, Executive Director of Preservation Dallas.

“This list is a roadmap for advocacy, education and development of programs in the preservation community that address the needs of these endangered properties,” Preziosi said. “We must work diligently to protect the places on the list as they are important to the history and fabric of Dallas, for once they are gone, they are lost forever.”

These historic places are irreplaceable community assets that tell the story of the city’s development.

“We hope this list of endangered properties makes the citizens of Dallas aware of how many important historic buildings are at risk of being lost forever,” said Nicky DeFreece Emery, Board President of Preservation Dallas. “Preservation Dallas sees this list as an opportunity for all of us to be more thoughtful in how the city grows and develops.”

Some of them, like East Dallas’ Elbow Room, won’t surprise you. But others will. Read on to see the list.

 

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Cliff Welch

Cliff Welch’s E. Lake Highlands Drive home featured in next weekend’s tenth annual White Rock Home Tour. Photos of house: Eric Homes

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the first one here and the second one here).

Cliff Welch

Photo: Cliff Welch

Cliff Welch, AIA, is a Dallas-based architect who champions modern architecture and designs with inspiration drawn from modern architecture of the last century.

His background includes working with the late Dallas modernist Bud Oglesby, later becoming a principal at Design International before starting his own firm, Welch Architecture, in January 2000.

One of his designs, located on East Lake Highlands Drive, is featured on the 10th annual White Rock Home Tour April 25-26. When the tour started in 2005, it showcased midcentury modern homes in the White Rock area; it has now expanded to include new construction, as well.

Welch earned his Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Master of Architecture from the University of Texas at Arlington. His work has received multiple Merit and Citation Awards from the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), as well as their coveted Young Architect of the Year award. He has also earned honors from Preservation Dallas, the Texas Society of Architects, D Home magazine, and the AIA.

Welch is the past president of the Dallas Architectural Foundation and taught graduate-level architecture classes at UT Arlington. He is a past executive board member of the Dallas Chapter AIA, also serving two years as their Commissioner of Design, and has chaired multiple chapter events, including various home tours. He also served as a design awards juror for other chapters around the state.

Welch’s White Rock Home Tour house’s elegant simplicity and open spaces incorporate modern design to create an exception environment.

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Preservation Dallas Architecture Styles

For the architecturally curious, things like the difference between Queen Anne and Colonial Revival style houses and the hallmarks of the Tudor Revival style are the stuff of late-night curious Googling.

A new exhibit produced by Preservation Dallas aims to clarify such matters using iconic Dallas architecture like the Old Red Museum and the Statler Hilton to illustrate.

“The Architectural Styles of Dallas” runs through June 8, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily at the Old Red Museum of Dallas County History and Culture at 100 S. Houston St. in downtown.

The content for the exhibit was written and assembled by Preservation Dallas over several months and includes contributions from architects and historians. The artifacts on display were selected to demonstrate the various architectural styles and grouped by time period. Decorative pieces, including remnants of Dallas’ demolished buildings, reproduction wallpaper, tile, hardware, and photographs illustrate specific architectural styles seen in historic Dallas buildings. These were combined with residential building elements sourced from salvage yards.

Noah Jeppson, the designer for the exhibit who helped with the curation, as well, said his favorite part is the Texas Centennial Exposition architectural artifacts, including original 1936 sketches and building model of Fair Park.

“It shows the importance placed on design for the high-profile event, which helped elevate the modern architecture movement in Dallas, with buildings we now consider historic,” Jeppson said. “From a residential perspective, I like the collection of house plan books, paint color manuals, and material guides that trace the architectural design trends—some appreciated more than others—over the decades.”

Historic architecture is diverse and fascinating and this exhibit will bring to life through text, photographs, and architectural elements the impressive history of architecture in Dallas. Visitors should leave with the knowledge to identify the styles of architecture found across the city (including their own homes) and learn about the dynamic architectural heritage of Dallas.

Admission to the exhibit is $4 or is included with the $8 general admission to the museum.

 

 

 

Statler Hilton Streetscape

Oh boy! We’re excited folks! The deal has gone through, and just as Candy predicted, Mehrdad Moayedi and his firm, Centurion American, have purchased the Statler Hilton form Leobardo Trevino’s Ricchi Investments.

Of course, there’ll be no pomp and circumstance or champagne cork popping in the streets like the celebration dance City Hall enjoyed when Trevino bought the famed midcentury modern hotel at 1914 Commerce Street. And while Ricchi Investments had ambitions plans for this incredible piece of downtown Dallas real estate, Moayedi brings an incredible plan and pairs it with a proven track record.

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Statler.rendering jpgI had to stop myself from making yet another one of the 20,000 editing mistakes one (I) makes when blogging 3000 to 5000 words per day. I almost typed “Has in Store for the Stoneleigh” instead of Statler, as in Statler Hilton in downtown Dallas. He owns the Creeks of Preston Hollow, too. Mehrdad just has too many darned developments, I cannot keep them straight!

Robert Wilonsky, lucky dude, got hold of documents and renderings he says are “floating” around Dallas City Hall, giving us a closer look at what this amazing and deep-pocketed developer has in store for the historic hotel site that is more in need of a makeover than Mariah Carey.

mariah carey-badOr me a week ago before blonde touch up.

I recall Mehrdad telling me he had visions of a hotel-condo combo, maybe a live-music venue in the old ballroom, a fun grocery (please, someone, Oakville Grocery or Draegers of Menlo Park, but I do love Dean & Deluca) a movie theater and more. In the comments, Wilonsky said some of the other names mentioned in the proposal were super high end, like Helmut Lang, Marc Jacobs, and Givenchy. High rollers, those guys, but if you bring in Armani, I’m all over the place!

Of course, we hold our (last year’s) Armani britches. This building has had previous owners and big plans before, but none that have come to fruition. There are several hoops to jump through with this William Tabler-designed building down at City Hall — including parking and other abatement concerns — and how much Mehrdad wants and gets from the TIF, or Tax Increment Financing. TIF’s started in California, but did you know that state no longer uses them because of a couple lawsuits?

Anyhow, Mehrdad wants to turn the 19-story mid century modern mecca into a “hub for downtown Dallas”, says Wilonsky.

Last week the city’s Urban Design Peer Review Panel met to review a handful of big-deal projects, among them the Statler. It’s important to note: The 38-page presentation, which filled with glorious renderings by Merriman Associates, is far from final. It’s more or less a dream journal of all the things Centurion American would like to see at the Statler — and the next-door former central library — that will need eventually the city’s OK, especially when Moayedi applies for Downtown Connection TIF District dollars in coming months.

The plans: 250,000 square feet of retail up and down Commerce Street, some in a new parking structure, some in new buildings. Sweet Jesus, someone is actually thinking of parking space. The “potential retailers” mentioned include Dean & Deluca, Apple, Nike, the Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, H&M.

Dean & Deluca, or another grocery store, would take up the first floor of the old library — some 19,000 square feet, give or take. Plans call for a 13,600-square foot “game area” above that, on the mezzanine. The second floor of the library would become a six-screen movie theater, with auditoriums ranging from 4,550 to 1,550 square feet, with a ticket-concession counter-bar area taking up another 1,800 square feet.

The Statler itself would have some ground-floor retail, which would be accompanied by a 5,812-square foot spa and a 14,440-square foot nightclub-slash-restaurant. Plans also call for the ground-floor spaces to interact with the sidewalks and street; at least one cafe would have a lovely view of Main Street Garden. The second floor would be given over to four meeting rooms, the catering kitchen and a 14,000-square foot ballroom.

Then the remaining 17 floors would be hotel rooms and apartments, which we need more of, underground parking and a parking garage type building.

Moayedi says the project is “90 percent likely to happen,” with an April 25 closing date penciled in for the Statler. He says financing is in place, and that city staff has been “working amazingly with us” to get this completed. He says that it should take another six months to remediate the Statler, with a year-end groundbreaking … fingers crossed.

Indeed!

Champs D'OrYes, you heard that right and no, this is not deja vue. The Dallas real estate market is back, and so is Champ d’Or, listed this time with that go-getter of a Rogers Healy, priced at $35 million.

You may recall the 48,000-square-foot Hickory Creek mansion (basically Denton), known as Champ d’Or, which translates to “Fields of Gold,” was put up for auction by Concierge Auctions out of New York March 30, 2012 with a minimum reserve bid of $10.3 million.

Champ d’Or cost about $46 million, took five years to build, and has been sitting on the market for umpteen years. Last market listing was in fact $35 million and at least five local tip-top brokers have attempted to shed the house.

Champ d’Or was modeled after Vaux-le-Vicomte chateau in Paris. Rogers tells me that the new owners, the Tabani family, have completed some renovation and extensive landscaping and I cannot wait to see what they have done to every square inch of this glorious property!

Stay tuned!

Champs D'OrYes, you heard that right and no, this is not deja vue. The Dallas real estate market is back, and so is Champ d’Or, listed this time with that go-getter of a Rogers Healy, priced at $35 million.

You may recall the 48,000-square-foot Hickory Creek mansion (basically Denton), known as Champ d’Or, which translates to “Fields of Gold,” was put up for auction by Concierge Auctions out of New York March 30, 2012 with a minimum reserve bid of $10.3 million.

Champ d’Or cost about $46 million, took five years to build, and has been sitting on the market for umpteen years. Last market listing was in fact $35 million and at least five local tip-top brokers have attempted to shed the house.

Champ d’Or was modeled after Vaux-le-Vicomte chateau in Paris. Rogers tells me that the new owners, the Tabani family, have completed some renovation and extensive landscaping and I cannot wait to see what they have done to every square inch of this glorious property!

Stay tuned!

Statler-Hilton-Block-Panora

Update Nov. 9: This must be a new retro trend — the live music venue! I’m told the developer refurbishing the At. Anthony Hotel in downtown St. Antonio also has plans to re-vive a ballroom and live music venue on the rooftop. Seems that, in the 1940’s and ’50s, folks would go down to the St. Anthony and dance to live bands while local radio stations broadcast the music. Perhaps this is what Mehrdad has in mind? (ce)

We love Mehrdad Moayedi, whom we’ve dubbed “Saint Stoneleigh.” Steve Brown at the DMN wrote yesterday what we wrote a month ago: Moayedi is buying downtown Dallas’ iconic Statler Hilton with plans for a residential conversion with unique amenities.

But this building has had previous owners and big plans before, but none that have come to fruition. There are several hoops to jump through with this William Tabler-designed building — including parking and other abatement concerns — some of which have stymied successful developers such as Jack Matthews of Matthews Southwest.

But Moayedi’s Centurion American breathed life back into the Stoneleigh, is well equipped to revive the 19-story Midcentury stunner of a hotel on Commerce Street. We also love that Moayedi want’s to bring more amenities to downtown with this project, including a movie theater and a grocery store. There’s also been talk of a live music venue. Wonderful ideas, and all sorely needed downtown.