Klyde Warren Park

Dallas’ landscape is crisscrossed with interstate highways that cut through and divide our city’s neighborhoods. The lasting effects of these high-speed thoroughfares on our city have been felt for years, but until recently, the only option was to grin and bear it. With an acute lack of will to remove them, urban planners had to come up with a solution for restoring the connection between neighborhoods. The answer: deck parks and connective parks.

Our first in North Texas was Klyde Warren Park, and our city can’t imagine what life would be like without the deck park that connects Uptown to downtown Dallas. And the city is planning a second deck park over Interstate 35 near Highway 67  to connect North Oak Cliff to the Dallas Zoo, though that project wasn’t without contention. Even Plano is getting on board with deck parks, with plans in the works for a park over the Dallas North Tollway that would connect the Shops at Legacy with Legacy West.

To further explore this growing trend, the Dallas Architecture Forum is hosting a panel discussion called “Deck Parks and Connective Parks in Dallas” moderated by Elissa Izmailyan, senior director for community and economic development for the Trinity Park Conservancy. The panel will feature Tara Green, past president of Klyde Warren Park and principal of OJB Landscape Architecture; Diane Jones Allen, director of Landscape Architecture at UTA, CAPPA; and Molly Plummer, Parks for People Program Manager for the Trust for Public Land in North Texas.

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7110 Cliffdale Avenue

If you aren’t familiar with the El Tivoli Place neighborhood, you’re not alone. Touted as a hidden North Oak Cliff treasure, the neighborhood epitomizes the saying that “big things come in small packages.”

El Tivoli Place is big on beauty, charm, life, and style. Despite its proximity to downtown Dallas, the neighborhood maintains a quiet, serene vibe characterized by rolling hills, creeks, winding streets, and old-growth trees. And the history of El Tivoli Place is every bit as colorful as the tapestry of native spring flowers growing throughout the area.

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Jenni Stolarski with Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty is marketing this adorable Hampton Hills home at 1426 S. Montreal for $329,000.

Hampton Hills is still living up to its 1924 branding campaign. When developer Alf W. Sanders kicked off his new home building venture 95 years ago, he ran an ad in the Dallas Morning News touting the small neighborhood “Oak Cliff’s Ideal Home Place.” His slogan not only attracted the middle management and tradesmen market that sought easy streetcar access to downtown jobs, but it also set the neighborhood vibe in stone for decades to come.

Besides convenient transportation, Sanders’ selling points ranged from permanently paved streets, water, gas, electricity, and sewer lines to well-drained higher ground, terraced lots, impressive views, and nearby schools.

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When I first fell in love with Winnetka Heights, I had those ambitious stars in my eyes about historic homes. You know the feeling, like you could transform a 100-year-old house into the stylish, cozy setting for the rest of your life. Today, I am tired. Really, really tired. I no longer have stars in my eyes, and my son has drained any energy and patience I could have spent on a long-term, romantic room-by-room historic renovation. However, I still love Winnetka Heights and its beautiful streets and undeniably charming character. 

Enter this listing from Compass Dallas agent Phillip Murrell. 

“It’s such a rare opportunity to find newer construction in such a popular historic district like Winnetka Heights,” Murrell said of our High Caliber Home of the Week presented by Lisa Peters of Caliber Home Loans. The house, though less than five years old, blends well into the historic fabric of the neighborhood with its large front porch and Craftsman touches. But the respect for the neighborhood from both the builder and the sellers goes much deeper than that, Murrell noted.

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This split-level at 2810 W. 9th Street is inside the Beverly Hills neighborhood of Oak Cliff.

You won’t find Rodeo Drive in Dallas’ Beverly Hills, but you will find a storied, deep-rooted neighborhood built by pure grit and generations of human spirit.

According to Heritage Oak Cliff, though Beverly Hills is now part of historic Oak Cliff, it began in the mid-19th century as a small dairy farming community on part of the McCoombs and McCracken Surveys outside the city of Oak Cliff. But its history stretches across the Trinity River.

In 1855, a group of immigrants from Switzerland, Belgium, and mostly France – called the European and American Society of Colonization to Texas – purchased 640 acres of former Peters Colony land for their Utopian settlement, La Reunion, where they had the freedom to pursue their political beliefs.

Coombs Creek cuts through the center of the Beverly Hills neighborhood of Oak Cliff.

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This darling blue little craftsman home at 820 N. Winnetka Ave. went under contract in just seven days. You might chalk that up to how hot this neighborhood is in north Oak Cliff, but there’s another reason we’re featuring this cutie for the Saturday Six Hundred. The sophisticated updates in this home are simply adorbs. The 1921-built home near W. Davis Street and N. Tyler Street has three bedrooms, three baths, and one half-bath in a roomy 2,454-square-foot open floor plan. It’s listed for $675,000 by April Allen of JP & Associates (more…)

Kings Highway started as a holding tank of a neighborhood as new Oak Cliff residents waited for their Winnetka Heights homes to be completed. The area has since found a flavor all its own.

Diversity is more than a buzz word in the Kings Highway neighborhood of North Oak Cliff. It’s a way of life that describes the people, the architecture, the vibe, and more than a century of cohesive imagination.

The early days of Kings Highway are reminiscent of a teenager trying to find himself. As the neighborhood that’s now bordered by Stewart Drive, Davis Street, Tyler Street, and Mary Cliff Road transitioned from 19th century cottonfields, it became the temporary home for future Winnetka Heights residents who were awaiting construction of their new homes.

The City of Dallas initially platted the holding-tank area as “Oak Cliff Annex,” and its first structures were apartment buildings constructed around 1910. At the eastern entrance where the trolley stopped, a brick archway provided the gateway to the neighborhood. Though the archway no longer stands, its welcoming message remains.

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Thanks to excellent planning and deed restrictions, Stevens Park has tremendous architectural character.

Stevens Park Estates has it all – old majestic homes, architectural diversity, a premier golf course, and breathtaking scenic views – wrapped in rich North Oak Cliff history and Stevens family lore.

In 1851, Dr. John H. Stevens – one of the first physicians in Dallas – purchased 168 acres on the courtyard steps after the Dallas County Sheriff seized the property from former owner William Myers to satisfy unpaid debts. Nearly 40 years later, Dr. Stevens’ two children, Annie and Walter Stevens, inherited the Myers Survey land, which had become the family farm. In 1926, the siblings began transforming the acreage atop lush green hills into a prestigious development overlooking a golf course and memorial park.

Stevens Park Golf Course, dubbed the Little Augusta of North Texas, is a beautiful spot to waste a day in North Oak Cliff.

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