HulcyDallas ISD school board trustee Joyce Foreman has a lot to brag about in her district these days, and that includes DA Hulcy STEAM Middle School.

“I certainly think there are some good stories about schools in Southwest Oak Cliff,” Foreman told us. “We recently turned an elementary school into a TAG Magnet, there is a new Two-Way Dual Language School, and we have a STEAM middle school that is doing well.  We also have a number of elementary schools that consistently do well.” (more…)

district 6 vote

Writer Bethany Erickson voted in less than five minutes yesterday, between tutoring readers and carpool.

As we take a look at Dallas ISD District 6 today, keep in mind that through next Tuesday, early voting means you, too, can walk in, do your civic duty, and walk back out in less time than it takes to pick up your dry cleaning.

catYesterday, between tutoring for Reading Partners and carpool, I stopped in to vote. It took me exactly three minutes from parking the car to getting back in and starting the engine. Just saying.

I know it may seem unimportant, but you probably do 500 unimportant things all day. Even if you think this is unimportant, too, maybe decide not to Google to see what happened to that guy who toured with Hansen, and go vote instead.

Or tell Janice you don’t have time to gab at the coffee pot today because you have to duck out and vote. I mean, given that it takes less than five minutes to vote, you still have time to pick up tacos on your way back. And bonus: then you get to be smug because you went to vote, and you have tacos.

See? Voting = Tacos. Tacos > Janice (sorry, Janice, but seriously, how often can you hear her story about what happened at the raw foods store she stopped at after Crossfit?). I repeat: Tacos.

Yesterday we reviewed the District 2 race, and today we’ll take a look at a much less contentious and quiet race — District 6.

As I have in previous elections, I will be breaking down each race and assigning a mathematical value to key endorsements for a final score.

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Dallas electionsFourteen Dallas City Council seats and three Dallas Independent School District trustee seats are up for grabs on May 6. I’ll start saying this early — as I always do: It can cost somewhere around $1 million to hold an election, and in most May Dallas elections, we see less than 10 percent of voters turning out to vote.

And it really couldn’t be much easier. Check and see if you’re registered to vote here.  If you’re not, you can click here to register. If you vote early, you can vote at any early voting polling location in the county – so on your way to work, during your lunch break, on your way home, or even on a Saturday. The last day to register to vote is April 6. Early voting begins April 24 and will continue through May 2 for all Dallas elections.

The last day to register to vote is April 6. Early voting begins April 24 and will continue through May 2. You can even vote on a Saturday or a Sunday.

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Dallas ISD's Board of Trustees voted Thursday to OK the purchase of 9400 N. Central Expressway. (Photo: Bethany Erickson)

Dallas ISD’s Board of Trustees voted Thursday to OK the purchase of 9400 N. Central Expressway. (Photo: Bethany Erickson)

As you’ve probably read by now, the Dallas Independent School District’s Board of Trustees voted 5-3 last night to purchase the building at 9400 N. Central Expressway in a bid to consolidate the district’s various departments that are currently spread all over Dallas County.

We can debate the merits of having a building where hundreds of employees will be able to work under one roof for the first time in probably more than 50 years, but that was done for quite some time last night.

Instead, I’d like to talk about something else that came to light (actually, I’ve heard the confusion from many a homeowner about this time every year, too) at this meeting — folks don’t know there’s a difference between the appraisal value Dallas County Appraisal District uses for taxation, and a fair market value appraisal. (more…)

hinojosa

Michael Hinojosa, courtesy Dallas ISD

To nobody’s surprise, the Dallas school board voted 6-1 to approve the hiring of former Dallas ISD superintendent Michael Hinojosa to his old post permanently. He had been serving as interim superintendent of Dallas public schools since June.

The lone dissenting vote was Joyce Foreman.

Hinojosa will be paid $350,000 a year, and will still collect his $200,000 per year pension. He did choose to eschew some perks, such as cell phone allowance, health insurance and car allowance, board president Eric Cowan told the Dallas Morning News Monday, prior to tonight’s called meeting.

 

Photo: Dallas ISD

Photo: Dallas ISD

I’ll have more later after I’ve had time to go through my notes, but brief rundown of tonight’s called meeting of the Dallas ISD Board of Trustees, with the lone item on the agenda being a discussion of superintendent Mike Miles’ employment status was contentious, and that may even be an understatement.

The meeting lasted for more than five hours, and much of that was in executive session. It was clear as the board came back into open session that the three board members who demanded – and went to court – for the meeting to take place were not happy with the outcome. After two rounds of expressing displeasure and a statement from Mike Miles (again, more after I’m able to review notes), the board voted – 2-7 in favor of issuing a letter of concern to Mike Miles. A letter of concern, for the record, has less weight than a letter of reprimand, so needless to say it was several steps below what many feared or hoped would happen tonight. The two no votes were from Joyce Foreman and Elizabeth Jones.

But in a surprise move, Foreman then made a motion that was apparently not discussed in the executive session – a motion to require Miles resign in December. Jones amended it to ask for an independent review of the state of the district. There was much back and forth, but the swing votes – Eric Cowan and Dan Micciche – both said they wanted a responsible succession plan, and this was not it. Ultimately, the measure failed, 3-6, with Foreman, Bernadette Nutall and Jones voting for it.