3525 Turtle Creek #7AB is currently listed by Elly Holder and Gretchen Brasch of Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty for $2.15 million.

When a property this chic comes across your desk, you pay attention, and such was the case when Elly Holder reached out to me for help writing the property romance for her rare-to-market offering in the iconic Howard Meyer designed 3525 Turtle Creek.

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Mark Parker and Eric Johnson are opening their gorgeous unit inside the Howard R. Meyer-designed midcentury classic 3525 Turtle Creek.

There are four home tours this weekend, but if your dance card is almost full, the Turtle Creek Association Tour of Homes should be on your short list. It’s perfect, actually — go to the Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society tour on Saturday and then hit the Turtle Creek Association Tour of Homes on Sunday. Boom. Consider your weekend planned.

This is the 15th annual TCA Tour of Homes, and they have a wonderful lineup of properties that feature amazing works of art. Of course, this tour wouldn’t be complete without a stop at the “Grand Dame” of Turtle Creek, the Howard Meyer-designed tower at 3525 Turtle Creek. I love this building because of its iconic brise soliel and its amazing views of the neighborhood. This building is on the National Register of Historic Places and has played host to some of the biggest names in midcentury politics and entertainment.

Of course, the units inside are fabulous, and this one owned by Eric Johnson and Mark Parker is particularly splendid. You can still purchase tickets to the tour, which runs from 1 to 5 p.m. with an exclusive after party from 6 to 8 p.m. Tour tickets are $60 apiece for non-TCA members and $50 apiece for members, but after party tickets are sold out!

If you want to win a pair of tickets to the Turtle Creek Association Tour of Homes so you can see Johnson and Parker’s gorgeous condo for yourself, stay tuned right here to CandysDirt.com!

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Jacotte house

All photos: Jeff Baker

Ten years ago, Catherine Horsey fell in love with a house.

Jacotte House

Catherine Horsey

Having spent seven years at the helm of Preservation Dallas, and recently returned to Dallas to work on the sustainable neighborhood Urban Reserve, Horsey saw an article on the house at 3216 Jacotte Cir. and was immediately smitten.

This home is significant in Dallas because it was Howard Meyer’s first modernist house, built in 1937. Meyer is one of Dallas’ first and most accomplished modern architects, known for designing Temple Emanu-El, one of the most distinguished works of contemporary architecture in Texas built during the 1950s; the Lipshy-Clark House at 5381 Nakoma Dr., one of the finest international modernist houses in Texas; and 3525 Turtle Creek Blvd., considered the most fully realized and successful modernist apartment building in Texas, perhaps in America.

Horsey saw this home’s rehabilitation as a great opportunity to showcase how historic preservation and green building practices could work hand-in-hand, and spent a year updating the entire house.

With the help of the original plans, photographs from a 1940 Architectural Record article, and conversations with Eugene K. Sanger, Sr., for whom the house was designed, Horsey restored its character-defining elements and adapted it for resource-efficient modern living.

“The longer I have lived in this house, the more I have loved it—that must be one of the definitions of good architecture,” Horsey said. “What I love about the house is the light—so many large windows that open out to the nearly 17,000-square-foot yard, and the very low utility costs. Howard Meyer really knew what he was doing when he designed this house for the Texas climate.”

This is a three bedroom, four bathroom house, with 2,034 square feet. Horsey is selling it herself for $739,000.

“It’s for sale by owner right now, because I’m going to do my best to keep it from falling into the wrong hands,” she said.

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Dallas Architecture Forum

Keynote speaker Leo Marmol is an expert on the Kaufmann House by Richard Neutra in Palm Springs, considered one of the most important residences of the 20th century. Photo: David Glomb

If you swoon over Frank Sinatra’s style, and you marvel over Mad Men‘s Midcentury Modern, then you won’t want to miss the next Dallas Design Symposium, presented by the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Titled Modernism, the focus of the symposium is the best of Midcentury Modern architecture and design. It will be held Oct. 4 from 2 – 5 p.m. at the Nasher Sculpture Center.

Keynote speaker Leo Marmol, FAIA, is one of the world’s leading authorities in the restoration of iconic Midcentury Modern and International Style residences, including the 1946 Kaufmann House by Richard Neutra in Palm Springs, and restorations of works by Cliff May, Rudolph Schindler, John Lautner, Minoru Yamasaki, and E. Stewart Williams. Marmol will overview his firm’s landmark restoration projects, as well as discuss how the firm integrates Midcentury design elements into their new construction and pre-fab projects, producing award-winning residences.

Dallas Architecture Forum

An interior photo of the Kaufmann House in Palm Springs. Photo: David Glomb

Also speaking at the symposium is Sidney Williams, curator of the Palm Springs Art Museum.  Her father-in-law, E. Stewart Williams, designed Frank Sinatra’s famous Twin Palms residence in Palm Springs, his first residential commission. She will share inside stories about Twin Palms, the homes of other movie stars, and the design history of the area.

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Cliff Welch

Cliff Welch’s E. Lake Highlands Drive home featured in next weekend’s tenth annual White Rock Home Tour. Photos of house: Eric Homes

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the first one here and the second one here).

Cliff Welch

Photo: Cliff Welch

Cliff Welch, AIA, is a Dallas-based architect who champions modern architecture and designs with inspiration drawn from modern architecture of the last century.

His background includes working with the late Dallas modernist Bud Oglesby, later becoming a principal at Design International before starting his own firm, Welch Architecture, in January 2000.

One of his designs, located on East Lake Highlands Drive, is featured on the 10th annual White Rock Home Tour April 25-26. When the tour started in 2005, it showcased midcentury modern homes in the White Rock area; it has now expanded to include new construction, as well.

Welch earned his Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Master of Architecture from the University of Texas at Arlington. His work has received multiple Merit and Citation Awards from the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), as well as their coveted Young Architect of the Year award. He has also earned honors from Preservation Dallas, the Texas Society of Architects, D Home magazine, and the AIA.

Welch is the past president of the Dallas Architectural Foundation and taught graduate-level architecture classes at UT Arlington. He is a past executive board member of the Dallas Chapter AIA, also serving two years as their Commissioner of Design, and has chaired multiple chapter events, including various home tours. He also served as a design awards juror for other chapters around the state.

Welch’s White Rock Home Tour house’s elegant simplicity and open spaces incorporate modern design to create an exception environment.

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Park Towers - Small

Jon Anderson fills us in on a little bit of Dallas’ high rise history in his latest column for CandysDirt.com.

(Editor’s Note: This is the third installment in a hopefully regular series from Jon Anderson, in which he dishes on the inner-workings of life in the sky. Anderson’s take on Dallas high rise living is both entertaining and educational. You can read his first installment here and his second installment here.)

By Jon Anderson
Special Contributor

Buildings of the 1950s and 1960s

Beginning in the late 1950s, Dallas saw a decade of building for its first residential high-rises. These Modernist buildings included a quintet of buildings on Turtle Creek – 3525 Turtle Creek, Turtle Creek North, Park Towers, “21” and The Gold Crest – as well as Athena and Preston Tower on Northwest Highway. With the exception of “21” (originally built as low-income housing by HUD), these were tony pied-à-terre or the full-scale residences of those wanting as much urban high-rise living as Dallas could offer. They’re close enough for “city lights” views but far enough away to not actually be in the then lifeless downtown core.

Trivia: These buildings began life as either co-ops or rental apartments that only converted to condos after Section 234 of the Housing Act of 1961 enabled FHA (Federal Housing Administration) to insure mortgages on condos. By 1969, all states had laws governing the creation of condominiums. Puerto Rico passed the first condo law in 1958 and the first continental US building was in Salt Lake City. One side-effect of this heritage is that these buildings have master meters for utilities resulting in a single bill that’s divided between owners (and part of the monthly HOA dues). Something to factor in when evaluating HOA fees – and summer electricity bills.

Jump for more!

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4504 Bordeaux Front

This is just such an amazing opportunity to live in an amazing home! Were you looking for the perfect rental for your relocation to Dallas? Have a couple of kids and want to be in a great school district? Love architecture and midcentury modern design? There could be no more perfect home for you!

This Howard Meyer-designed three-bedroom, three-bath modern dream home was recently on the market for $1.2 million and you can rent it today for $6,495 a month! It’s listed with the gorgeous Dave Perry-Miller agent Charme Gallini.

Now, I may be biased, but I think that this wonderful time capsule of a home showed a lot better when it was on the Spring Modern Home Tour. There was furniture! Color! Perspective! The space was alive.

Today, well … it’s all very, very white.

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The "Rose House" by Howard Meyer

The “Rose House” by Howard Meyer

Did you enter our giveaway for one of three pairs of tickets to the 2014 Spring Modern Home Tour? Find out if you won after the jump!

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