home pricesHome sales fell in North Texas in the fourth quarter of 2018, Dallas-Fort Worth hit record home prices last year, and the Arlington Black Chamber of Commerce will hold its Hard Hat Construction Expo — and we have all this and more in this week’s roundup of real estate news.

Area Home Sales Fall in 4Q 2018

While the median home price grew, home sales in North Texas fell 7.6 percent in the fourth quarter of 2018, a report by Texas A&M’s Real Estate Center said.

Area home sales fell to 22,402 transactions, while the median home price grew 2.4 percent over the year to $260,000. Months of inventory rose 32.5 percent to 2.5 months, and residential property listings increased to 29.4 percent in 2018 to 20,627 listings.

Courtesy the Texas A&M Real Estate Center

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home salesHow did Dallas do when it comes to home sales compared to the nation? Are we starting to see more inventory? Where are various generations choosing to live in Dallas-Fort Worth? We have all of that in this week’s roundup of real estate news.

DALLAS HOME SALES DECLINE IN OCTOBER

The number of homes sold across the country fell in October, including in Dallas, Redfin reported.

In Dallas, the median sales price in October was $280,000, down 2.8 percent from September, but overall unchanged year over year. Homes sold was down 3.3 percent in October to 4,630, and down 8.7 percent year over year. New listings were down .3 percent in October to 6,140, but up by almost 3 percent year over year. (more…)

Realtors

Nancy Wilson of Coldwell Banker Residential was honored by the Greater East Dallas Chamber of Commerce with the Live Local Award.

Which two realtors (and what designer) were recognized by a local chamber of commerce for their work in East Dallas? How do North Texas home sales in July compare statewide? And where is the job growth in Texas?
We answer all those questions in this week’s roundup of real estate news. (more…)

Home prices in North Texas broke more records last month, according to reports. Properties in Far East Dallas are selling for close to $300K in some cases, such as this one at 2031 Housley in Casa View, which is listed for $279,000.

Far East Dallas is swarming teeming with work trucks as investors, eager to catch the wave of demand within inner-loop neighborhoods, remodel homes on these close-quartered blocks. But even with all of the flippers tacking up new drywall and painting these post-war ranches varying shades of gray, supply of move-in ready homes hasn’t kept up with demand. Because of these market dynamics — the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metro area’s net population growth is at about 974,000 new residents since 2010 — prices are surging, breaking new records.

Of course, one can’t help but wonder if this breakaway price growth could mean that a bubble is about to burst …

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arlington home sales

The property at 1404 Millbrook Dr. in Arlington is one of many on the market now, and homes in that market are fast appreciating.

It’s not just Dallas and northern suburbs where homes are notably appreciating and sales are “fly-off-the-market” fast. Arlington, Grand Prairie, and Mansfield showed substantial increases last month in both home prices and sales, according to a new report from the Arlington Board of Realtors.

Arlington home sales increased 9 percent, Grand Prairie’s increased 9 percent, and Mansfield home sales increase a whopping 36 percent in March 2016. Home prices increased in all markets, as well.

“We continue to be in a strong real estate market, as the numbers show,” said Tim Beary, 2016 Chairman of the Arlington Board of Realtors.

The numbers for homes sold, median price, monthly housing inventory, average number of days on the market, and active home listings were all notable in these three DFW markets.

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The Lone Star State isn’t the same place as it was during the big 1980s oil bust, and is better weathering falling oil prices, but further price plunges and worker layoffs could negatively impact home sales and construction.

This is according to new research by Texas A&M Real Estate Center research economist James Gaines, who published Texas 2015 Housing Market and the Price of Oil last week. The six-page report explains that Texas’ economy has diversified significantly since the 80s bust, relying much more on healthcare, technology, and other sectors.

Here’s the takeaway:

The price of Texas oil and the upstream energy sector is a prime cause of concern for Texas’ 2015 economy and housing market. History shows that Texas’ housing does not depend on high oil prices. In fact, the state’s housing market has thrived at prices within a wide range of oil prices lower than those experienced in 2013 and the first half of 2014.

Read the full story over on MidlandDirt.com!

 

 

 

Oil prices may or may not influence home values and sales in Dallas, but Houston and the Permian Basin may feel the effects of the dropping price per barrel.

Oil prices may or may not influence home values and sales in Dallas, but Houston and the Permian Basin may feel the effects of the dropping price per barrel.

It seems like economists can’t make heads or tails of the dropping oil prices, other than it’s good for consumers. I filled my little hybrid up the other day for less than $30, so I’m going to call it an obvious win in that column. But with the high demand and limited supply of housing in the Permian Basin, and how Houston home values have skyrocketed, we’re left wondering if these two Texas regions will bear the brunt of cheap oil.

“Oil prices are certainly something to keep an eye on,” said Metrostudy’s David Brown in this DMN report. “As long as oil prices do not continue to decline and don’t stay at a level below $55 a barrel for a sustained period, we should continue to see solid demand for housing in the region.”

On the other hand, Trulia’s Jed Kolko says the impact on home values is coming, but it won’t be felt immediately.

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CoreLogic HPI Jan 14

CoreLogic’s newest HPI report released today showed that Texas real estate professionals have good reason to blame their busy days on the hot market. Home prices in Texas are at new highs (yes, higher than pre-bubble manic market highs!), with January 2014 up 10.1 percent over a year ago, and home prices up 1.2 percent from Dec. 2013 (numbers include distressed sales).

In the Dallas-Plano-Irving MSA, home prices are up 12.2 percent year-over-year including distressed sales, and up 10.4 percent excluding distressed sales. National numbers show home prices up 12 percent year over year for January. This is the 23rd consecutive month that home prices have increased, and Texas is one of only three states that has reached a new peak in home prices after the housing bust. And despite near-record appreciation, Nevada is still 40.1 percent below peak prices, CoreLogic’s report showed. Incredible.

“Polar vortices and a string of snow storms did not manage to weaken house price appreciation in January,” said CoreLogic chief economist Mark Fleming. “The last time January month-over-month and year-over-year price appreciation was this strong was at the height of the housing bubble in 2006.”

So, winter didn’t slow Dallas down, and we’re looking at a brisk spring selling season ahead. Still, real estate prices are a hyper-local economy, and while some areas are seeing hand-over-fist sales and appreciation (we’re looking at you, Lake Highlands and University Park) some areas will only see more modest gains. The key, of course, is pricing a home correctly and being flexible.

Where are you seeing break-neck appreciation and sales pace?