Wanna buy the chair of a newspaper reporter ghost of past? Two Dallas auction companies are selling remnants of Dallas Morning News‘ vacated campus at 508 Young Street at an estate auction ending tomorrow morning at 10 a.m.

The estate sale companies, Star Auction Resources and World Wide Auction Group Team, call this sale a “must” for people who appreciate Dallas history and memorabilia. “This building is being renovated and we must clean it out,” the listing reads.

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The high-rise buildings that line the Turtle Creek corridor typically fall into two groups: Midcentury designs by icons of architecture, and newer buildings that sport a lot of classical details. But one of my favorite buildings on Turtle Creek falls into a group all its own. It’s the George Dahl-designed Gold Crest, which has such great lines and huge terraces and lots of great floor plans. This building has aged well, and thanks to its prime location on Turtle Creek, this particular unit will have excellent views of another starchitect-designed building: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Kalita Humphreys Theater.

To live in a building designed by George Dahl with excellent views of a building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright? That’s part of what makes this exceptionally stylish Gold Crest studio our High Caliber Home of the Week presented by Lisa Peters of Caliber Home Loans. The other reason we’re in love with this unit is the clean design and beautifully minimalist decor.

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Splurge vs Steal: Two Fabulous Oak Lawn Condos | CandysDirt.com

Oak Lawn is one of Dallas’ great neighborhoods with awesome location, lots of restaurants, nightlife, a huge variety of real estate, and the Turtle Creek area with its parks and wildlife. 

For this week’s Splurge vs Steal, we’re looking at two fabulous Oak Lawn condos. One is in the iconic Gold Crest, designed by George Dahl. The other is an affordable two-bedroom that has been recently renovated. They both offer great location in this hot neighborhood. 

 

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We all know the Gold Crest on Turtle Creek.  Even though it’s just 11 stories tall, its design overshadows many taller buildings on the boulevard.  It was built in 1964 by George Dahl and it was his home for the last decades of his life.

Fresh on the market after over 34 years with the same owner is unit 1101 on the penthouse level.  While other buildings belled and whistled their penthouse levels with jumbo combined units, the 11th floor of the Gold Crest is like any other. It’s a two-bedroom, two-bathroom unit with 1,630 square feet and listed with Janet Rone of Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate for $725,000.  Don’t bother clicking on the link for pictures, there’s one and it’s of the exterior. But I do have the floor plan and my crayons …

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Original Hillcrest State Bank building peels back its skin

In 1930, the Hillcrest State Bank was formed. Doing well, as banks do, by 1938 they were able to open a George Dahl-designed location on Hillcrest Avenue between Daniel and Haynie avenues. In 1981, Hillcrest State Bank changed its name to Texas Commerce Bank.  In 1998, the name was changed again to Chase Bank of Texas and was folded into Chase Manhattan Bank in 2000.  In 2004, Ohio’s Bank One was acquired by Chase foreshadowing the bank’s headquarters move to Ohio in 2004 where it remains today.

As you can see, for all the name changes, this building never actually changed hands until the bank had abandoned it.  First to try redevelopment was Dallasite Albert Huddleston who envisioned a mixed-use project that never gained traction with University Park officials or neighbors.  After a decade he gave up and in 2015 local developer Jim Strode decided to try his luck, which eventually succeeded.

Along with ownership and name changes, there have been structural changes.  As the picture above hints, over the years there was some pretty major tinkering to this building.

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1505 Elm PH - Interior 1

Originally built in 1957 and designed by George Dahl, 1505 Elm Street began life as the home of Dallas Federal Savings. In 1974 it was sold to Dresser Industries for their headquarters. It changed hands a few more times before in 2001 Lazarus Property purchased it to convert into Dallas’ first office-to-condo conversion. The 17-story building now houses 67 condos including a 6,465 square foot, full-floor penthouse shell.

Since the converted units began selling in 2002, the penthouse has been relentlessly on the market for $1.5 million.  It’s been with Steve Shepherd of Local Dwelling since 2010.  Recently it took a huge price drop of over 36 percent to $985,000 or $152 per square foot. Compared to neighboring Museum Tower’s penthouse listed at $1,953 per square foot, this would appear to be a bargain …

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FLW Rogers Lacy 2

Having run around a lot of high-rises in Dallas over the years as a potential buyer, open house voyeur, and CandysDirt.com roving reporter, people ask me what I think of “X” building. With that in mind, here’s my list of the top Dallas high-rises in different categories.

1. Best Unbuilt high-rise: Rogers Lacy Hotel

Long before I moved to Dallas, I saw the Rogers Lacy Hotel images in a 1985 book about architect Frank Lloyd Wright titled, “Treasures of Taliesin: Seventy-Seven Unbuilt Designs” by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer.

The 64-story mixed-use building was to have housed a hotel on the first nine floors before transitioning to a stepped-back high-rise column containing residential condos/apartments.  Wright didn’t think much of Dallas summers or its 1940s cityscape and so the glass exterior was to have been double-thickness with translucent insulation between the panels.  This way, light was transmitted without having to see the outside.  Some panels were moveable and some were operable windows, but the general “face” of the building was towards the interior where an amazing atrium was to have been. Lush plants and interior-facing windows offered what Wright thought were the best “views” of Dallas.  The building was never built because during negotiations to convince oilman Rogers Lacy of the daring design, Mr. Lacy died.

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City Council 2

In what I expect was a piece of theater, last night, the Dallas City Council trucked over to Fair Park to meet with the people in an open-door session. The goal was for citizens to voice their opinions about the Fair Park task force’s plans. As one black community leader pointed out, a two-hour session with the neighborhood after a year of work by a largely secretive task force was “a slap in the face.”

Before I continue, I ended my last piece on Fair Park wondering how much rent the city was generating from the State Fair.

In 2013 (the most recent financial statements I could find), the State Fair generated $42,411,006 in revenues (up $4.5-million from 2012) and paid the city $1,784,185 in rent for its 3.5 month lease of Fair Park. That would place an annual rental value on Fair Park of $5,947,283 or just $1,789 per acre per month. Does that seem a terrifically low price for a National Register property?

Put in perspective, the nonprofit State Fair pays its top nine executives just over $3 million in salaries and perks, not quite double what they pay the entire city of Dallas. Also keep in mind, for $1,789 a month you could either rent a 917 square foot, 1-bedroom apartment in West Village or an ACRE at Fair Park with all its accompanying historical buildings. How’s that for perspective?

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