Sergeant Dining Table by Scout Design

Scout Design is a design showroom that sells everything from furniture to pop art to life-size zebra sculptures – and their brand is as bold as their pieces.

On their website, you’ll find phrases like, “We’re not for everyone. Neither are you,” “Brassy and sassy,” and, “Blanche is back. Here for a good time, not a long time.”

Scout Design launched in 2012 by Flann Harris and Tiffany Taylor, the design duo entered the marketplace with a keen eye for vintage pieces and a vision to rework and recreate those very pieces.

Today, Scout is one of the established go-tos for designers and consumers alike and they’ve expanded considerably.

Every inch of their 15,000-square-foot showroom in the Design District is filled with unique, bold, brash pieces. And yes, they still sell vintage, but now those vintage pieces sit right alongside their limited edition, exclusive Scout Label furniture, and home accessories.

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It’s not often you see a single-story residential property with an MU-3 zoning classification (Multi-Use). But then again, 2292 Vantage is just west of the Anatole and a smidge further along I-35E in the Design-ish District. It’s at the end of a small street next to the un-glamourous tail of Turtle Creek and the Trinity Strand Bike Trail (nifty).

Like most semi-industrial property, there’s a lot of space, but unlike a lot of places in warehouse areas, not a gigantic amount. It’s a more practical 2,500 square feet with two bedrooms and two bathrooms listed for $699,995 with Paige Whiteside from Coldwell Banker Residential (also the property’s owner). Sure, you can work here, setup an office or showroom, but as you’ll see, whyyyyyyyy?

Very private, very quiet, very park-like. I remember a time when I’d have pulled out my checkbook for a home like this. I remember touring old fire stations to renovate in Chicago (as all gay boys do) and I even had my eye on a three-quarter acre parcel in the Design District – 25 years before I moved here!

What makes this property great is the mix. It’s industrial, but it’s very residential with a pool, grassy backyard, and borders Turtle Creek. It’s for someone who wants to be near everything but with ghost town emptiness in the evenings and weekends.

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We just got word that one of our favorite retailers of clean lines and modern appeal is having an epic warehouse sale next week. I’ve always been a fan of Scott+Cooner, a brand that absolutely dominates the contemporary furnishings game both here and in Austin. 

The holiday warehouse sale will run from Dec. 12 to 15 and include floor samples and more from both Austin and Dallas stores. You can find final clearance from brands such as B&B Italia, Cassina, Poltrona Frau, Ingo Maurer, and more, with discounts of up to 70 percent off of retail!

The Scott+Cooner warehouse is located at 2150 Irving Blvd. near Wycliff. For a map, click here.

Dallas is experiencing phenomenal inner city growth. Neighborhoods like Oak Cliff, the Trinity River Corridor, Deep Ellum, Ross Avenue, and the Design District are seeing urban infill like never before, showing up in all scales and types.

inner city growth

Robert Meckfessel, FAIA

These changes are remaking the city and opening up new opportunities for residents and businesses alike. But when we look at housing, retail, restaurants, office, and streetscapes, what are the traits that make for good infill and connectivity for these areas?

These are the questions posed for the next Dallas Architecture Forum event, a panel presented in collaboration with Preservation Dallas called Remaking the City.

The event will be moderated by Robert McFessel, FAIA, President of DSGN Associates and past president of leading organizations involved with the quality of the built environment, including the Dallas Architecture Forum, Preservation Dallas, LaReunion TX, and AIA Dallas.

McFessel currently serves on the boards of LaReunion TX, The Trinity Trust, Trinity Commons Foundation, DoCoMoMo U.S., Greater Dallas Planning Council, and the Advisory Board of the Dallas Architecture Forum.

Panelists include:

  • Edwin Cabannis: Owner of the Kessler Theater
  • Katherine Seale: Chair of the City of Dallas Landmark Commission and Past Director of Preservation Dallas
  • Evan Sheets: Senior Urban Designer at Dallas City Design Studio
  • Dan Shipley, FAIA: Founder and Principal at Shipley Architects

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Barry Williams Interior B

All photos courtesy Barry Williams

If one could step into the imagination of interior designer Barry Williams, I imagine one would find a lavish, carefully curated place of amaranthine loveliness, as well as an endless inventory of ideas.

He brings a photographer’s eye, a perfectionist’s attention to detail, and a historian’s context to his work at Williams Design Inc., a firm he opened in the Dallas Design District in 1999.

Williams is one of the most exclusive designers in Dallas, creating exquisitely appointed interiors for a select register of clientele. His nickname is “the billionaire’s decorator” because he has worked for six. He has no website, because he’s not interested in making himself available to everyone, only those as serious about beautiful design as he is. For years, his business even had an unlisted telephone number.

Barry Williams portrait

“I love to get it right,” he said about his design philosophy. “I want to prepare for every meeting with every new client with a lot of energy and care and my desire is to be retained until the last detail clicks into place and the house looks finished and complete and feels good.”

And details are his specialty. For decades, Williams has carried a camera on him all day, every day, to capture and catalogue the elements around him. By his estimation, he has 54,000 photographs that aid his design work.

“I am hugely inquisitive and am always seeking and finding new patterns, colors, techniques, and details. I see new things everywhere all the time,” he said. “I have a nuclear-grade memory and can recall details from far and wide and bring them together in a new way.” Jump to read more!

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A little luxury on a budget can be achieved with careful design, says Bernadette Schaeffler.

A little luxury on a budget can be achieved with careful design, says Bernadette Schaeffler.

We’re all looking for ways to maximize our style on a budget, but for those who want high-fashion interiors on a dime, it takes some thought and care to do it right.

Interior designer Bernadette Schaeffler says that beautiful rooms don’t have to pull on your purse strings. She offered several great tips to achieving a stylish bedroom on a budget.

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Modern Couch with Antiques

We’ve seen a renaissance of sorts when it comes to modern decor, but more homeowners and designers are moving away from cold and overly linear motifs to warmer versions. Bernadette Schaeffler, owner of her eponymous design showroom near downtown, thinks the minimalist Bauhaus style is here to stay, but adding antiques and texture can bring in warmth to otherwise monochrome furnishings.

“I personally believe that the minimalistic Bauhaus style will still be trendy in 2014,” Schaeffler said. “I think that this design style will be mixed with more decorative features. Imagine such modern design with one antique piece — it can make the interior very luxurious and more inviting. Neoclassical accessories look fabulous in this design.

Mixing minimalist furniture with more feminine decor is a lot like how Transitional style melds traditional-style furniture with modern palettes and accessories. But with many people moving to urban environments and smaller dwellings, a lot of furnishings will have to do double duty.

Bauhaus Table Color

“Given the fact that I see more and more people moving into apartments, I see a trend in different shelf systems. It can be used as room dividers or bookshelves that gives character and personality to a home,” Schaeffler said. This goes hand in hand with the slow-growing but important move to more eco-friendly manufacture and design.

“I truly believe that in future people will choose materials that are more eco-friendly,” Schaeffler added. “Being German, for me, this was always an important concept. I remember the members of the Green party in early 1980s Germany sitting in our government in sweaters, knitting for the family while making politics. As we have to protect Earth I believe that manufacturers will use more eco-friendly environmental friendly materials.”

But eco-friendly doesn’t necessarily mean drab. Schaeffler thinks color is going to play a bigger role in decor, with pops of turquoise and lighter wood working in harmony to create a more Zen-like environment. The goal, of course, is to make homes more relaxed and “livable,” Schaeffler said.

“I think it is over to just design house or apartment to look good,” Schaeffler added. “I believe that in 2014, people will want to make their homes livable yet stylish!”

Find out more about Bernadette Schaeffler’s style and personality at her Design District showroom.

Modern Couch with Antiques

We’ve seen a renaissance of sorts when it comes to modern decor, but more homeowners and designers are moving away from cold and overly linear motifs to warmer versions. Bernadette Schaeffler, owner of her eponymous design showroom near downtown, thinks the minimalist Bauhaus style is here to stay, but adding antiques and texture can bring in warmth to otherwise monochrome furnishings.

“I personally believe that the minimalistic Bauhaus style will still be trendy in 2014,” Schaeffler said. “I think that this design style will be mixed with more decorative features. Imagine such modern design with one antique piece — it can make the interior very luxurious and more inviting. Neoclassical accessories look fabulous in this design.

Mixing minimalist furniture with more feminine decor is a lot like how Transitional style melds traditional-style furniture with modern palettes and accessories. But with many people moving to urban environments and smaller dwellings, a lot of furnishings will have to do double duty.

Bauhaus Table Color

“Given the fact that I see more and more people moving into apartments, I see a trend in different shelf systems. It can be used as room dividers or bookshelves that gives character and personality to a home,” Schaeffler said. This goes hand in hand with the slow-growing but important move to more eco-friendly manufacture and design.

“I truly believe that in future people will choose materials that are more eco-friendly,” Schaeffler added. “Being German, for me, this was always an important concept. I remember the members of the Green party in early 1980s Germany sitting in our government in sweaters, knitting for the family while making politics. As we have to protect Earth I believe that manufacturers will use more eco-friendly environmental friendly materials.”

But eco-friendly doesn’t necessarily mean drab. Schaeffler thinks color is going to play a bigger role in decor, with pops of turquoise and lighter wood working in harmony to create a more Zen-like environment. The goal, of course, is to make homes more relaxed and “livable,” Schaeffler said.

“I think it is over to just design house or apartment to look good,” Schaeffler added. “I believe that in 2014, people will want to make their homes livable yet stylish!”

Find out more about Bernadette Schaeffler’s style and personality at her Design District showroom.