Last night, District 14 council member David Blewett held the first community meeting of an authorized hearing involving the Arts District. The purpose is two-fold:

First to update the original Arts District plan (known as the Sasaki Plan) adopted by the city in 1981 – no surprise that urban planning has changed.

Secondly, the desire to expand one of two Planned Development Districts (PDs) to grow the district one block south to San Jacinto Street from the DMA to One Arts Plaza and unofficially encompassing Klyde Warren Park.

So far so good, nothing too odd here. But …

An authorized hearing is called when the city needs to decide on appropriate zoning (changes) in a specified area and in certain instances (i.e. all authorized hearings are zoning cases, but not all zoning cases are authorized hearings). But off the bat, we heard that Dallas Arts District representatives have been working on the Sasaki rewrite for roughly five years. They presented full-blown-and-baked renderings of their proposed streetscapes and appeared to have the new PD verbiage captured. We also saw that 90 to 100 percent of the stakeholders were already in agreement.

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shepherd

Highly-respected Dallas architect Phillip W. Shepherd Sr. died Thursday, July 11, 2019, a longtime family friend confirmed to CandysDirt. He was 77.

Reared in Graham, Shepherd graduated with a degree in architecture from Texas Tech University in the 1960s. He began his firm, PWS Architects, in 1963.

Photo courtesy The Crescent

When you look at the current landscape of Uptown Dallas, you’d be hard pressed to find a place Shepherd didn’t influence as an architect. His portfolio is long and varied, and includes such Dallas mainstays as The Crescent Hotel and the Mansion on Turtle Creek.

In Dallas, he collaborated with other architects and builders to craft buildings that would honor Texas history, but also put a distinctly contemporary stamp on places the city (and its visitors) would come to work and play. (more…)

SamsCityplace

Interesting piece in the Wall Street Journal (sub req.) on Sunday raised a sacreligious question: are the billions we are spending on light rail really worth it, especially real-estate wise? Los Angeles and other auto-heavy Sunbelt cities such as Phoenix, Denver and Charlotte, N.C., are building out expensive light rail systems costing billions of dollars, funded by sales taxes and federal dollars. Urban experts tell us light rail encourages dense development, helps unclog traffic arteries, and boosts real estate values and development at station points. And of course, it’s so green.

In fact,

A 2014 study of the Phoenix area’s light-rail system co-written by Arizona State University professor Michael Kuby showed an increase in residential and commercial property values after the system was introduced, extending more than a mile from stations.

But not so in Charlotte, where a 2012 study of property values near the light-rail system stations there produced a “mixed bag of results.” Apparently a few high end developers put up some fancy digs near the stations that would have been built anyhow. As for creating a real estate boom, light rail may be like robbing Peter to pay Paul: just pilfers real estate values from another part of the city:

Randal O’Toole, a transportation and land use expert for the conservative Cato Institute, said he believes local governments are investing in light rail only “because the federal government is offering money for it.” If proximity to transit lines does boost property values, “it does so at the expense of values somewhere else in the same city or urban area,” he said.

Of course, we have a DART station on Central Expressway at CityPlace. And what do we have across from it? A big box Sam’s Club. Yeah, don’t get me started. Haskell is becoming a whole new world. But no, we couldn’t have some mixed-use something with housing, developer went for the quick buck. (more…)

GetMedia-2.ashx

Photos: Shoot2Sell

When I saw this charming 1938 Hollywood Santa Monica Tudor, I didn’t even recognize it as the same adorable cottage, at 6804 Vivian Avenue, that I’d written about three years ago. I couldn’t put my finger on why I failed to remember it, as the prominent leaded window with stained glass accents is such a standout it’s hard to forget. Then there’s the unique domed living room ceiling with a diamond center — equally memorable — and it was on the Hollywood Heights Home Tour in 2007.

What was the subtle, yet major change that had been made to make this home completely different?

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plano arts district

An artist’s rendering of the soon-to-be-renovated Saigling House, which will be the new permanent home of ArtCentre Plano. This will be part of the new Plano arts district in the historic downtown area. Photo: Suzy Sloan Jones

Downtown Plano has gone from sleepy suburb center to bustling business and cultural area over the past decade. Now the city is looking to create an official arts district in its historic 80-acre downtown.

The downtown area has already seen over 50,000 square feet of private development, including more than 1,100 urban apartments built or approved, and the restoration of historic commercial and civic buildings. Multiple art galleries, shopping spots, and restaurants draw people of all ages to the area. An official arts district will is the next step to encourage business and job development, create a tourist and resident destination, and foster local cultural development.

“It’s the right move, especially with all the growth in Plano,” said Suzy Sloan Jones, executive director of the ArtCentre of Plano. “With Toyota, Liberty Mutual, and FedEx headquarters moving to this community, those people will be looking for things to do with the arts.”

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boulder front

Southlake is such a fabulous town, with great schools, incredible shopping, and beautiful neighborhoods. I just love this area, which is perfect for families with school-aged kids. But what if your nest is empty and you’re not expecting a boomerang kid? Downsizing has probably crossed your mind.

That’s what Merlene Ingraham and her husband are doing. They’re selling their barely-lived-in Southlake home and heading closer to Dallas, like many Baby Boomers, so they can be close to the arts.

Boulder staircases

This house is just magnificent, with four bedrooms, four full bathrooms and one half bath, more than 5,800 square feet and the most amazing finish-out you can imagine. Really, I am in awe of 517 Boulder Drive, which is marketed by Dave Perry-Miller agent Christine McKenny for $865,000. Plus, it’s hardly been lived in at all. This home has so much visual impact, from the pristine, white exterior to the twin staircases in the foyer, your eyes will just pop.

Boulder Kitchen

My favorite part of this home, which will surprise absolutely no one, is this bright and beautiful kitchen with cottage-style white cabinets and stainless steel appliances. There’s an ample island, too, for preparing feasts for all occasions or perhaps just being a gathering space for girlfriends as you gab over glasses of Pinot. It’s open to the living area, too, which has high ceilings and huge windows.

Boulder pool:backyard

The master bath is amazing, too, with a soaking tub and luxurious tile, but the place I can see myself relaxing is the backyard. I just love the garden, which has a great English feel with short, wandering hedges. The pool is just beautiful, too. But it’s pretty large for just two people, right? I’m sure Merlene and her husband will find a gorgeous condo near the Dallas Arts District that will give them everything they need.

Nasher roofGreg Greene, one of the developers of Museum Tower, has told Candace Carlisle at the Dallas Business Journal that “ownership wants to financially step up to fix the tower’s glare inside the galleries at the Nasher Sculpture Center.” But then he added, agreeing on a solution could take more time. And it looks as though that solution is the $5 million we told you last week that MT has offered to completely change out the Nasher’s roof. And also, note that Greene used the term “air space”:

“It’s an unfortunate set of circumstances, but those oculi are pointed right at our air space,” Greg Greene, a development partner at Dallas-based Turtle Creek Holdings Inc. told the Dallas Business Journal Tuesday during an exclusive tour of the property. “They were here first, but they don’t have the right to take someone’s air space,” Greene told me (Candace Carlisle). “Why isn’t theDallas Museum of Art complaining or anyone else complaining? Because they have a solid roof and they don’t have oculi pointed at our air space. That’s the problem and that’s what needs to be fixed.”

Recall Museum Tower officials presented a solution to foot the bill to reconfigure the oculi on the Nasher roof to point away from the new high-rise, which would essentially return the lighting in the Nasher to pre-Museum Tower conditions.Nasher rooftop

I caught up with Dallas agent Scott Deakins, who has sold a lot of Arts District condos, for his take on Museum Tower’s generous proposal, a proposal Greene told the DBJ would reduce profitability of the project somewhat.

CD: So Scott, you’ve been out of town, and you come back in and hear the news about Museum Tower’s offer to re-do essentially the Nasher’s roof. Were you surprised?

SD: It’s good to be back.  Paris says hi, btw!  No, I’m not surprised, this situation gets dumb and dumber. All you can do is roll your eyes.  Last year they asked the Nasher to grow taller trees ( to offset the glare) and now they want to replace the roof, which in itself is a significant architectural detail.  Give me a break.

CD: I’m particularly interested in your views since you have sold so many homes in the Arts District, and you live there (right?) This doesn’t seem reasonable to you? Why not?

SD: Yes, I live in the Arts District and no, it is not reasonable for a variety of reasons; why punish the victim in all of this?  The Nasher didn’t ask for this.

Also, this is not just hurting the museum part of the Nasher-what about the loss of the landscape in the sculpture garden?  What about the loss of the James Turrell Skyspace installation (see below).  This problem also affects Klyde Warren Park, drivers on Woodall Freeway. I have calls all the time from clients at One Arts complaining about the glare from the building from the morning (eastern) sun.  This is a 360 degree problem.

CD: You told me that a recent article in the New York Times by Wil Hylton almost mourned for Skyspace – and that everyone who wants to understand the function of light should read this: “One of my favorite Turrell pieces is the Skyspace “Tending (Blue),” which is inside a small stone building behind the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. To reach the piece, you pass through a Renzo Piano-designed building filled with northern light, then you cross the clean, clear lines of a landscape by Peter Walker. By the time you enter the Skyspace, the city of Dallas is long forgotten. I once lost the better part of a day inside, staring up as clouds lofted and flattened against the ceiling. But last year, a mirrored skyscraper went up nearby, reflecting glare into the building, killing plants in the garden and looming into view of the Skyspace. The museum had to close it.

SD: Yes! I wanted your followers, real estate developers and consumers, to see the New York Times piece because of the significant loss of the much loved James Turrell Skyspace thanks to the intrusion of Museum Tower.  The loss is permanent! Also, what are readers of the Times all over the world going to take away from this article about Dallas – that selling condos is more important than our culture and love of the arts? My point is MT is hurting ALL aspects of the Nasher, not just the building.

CD: But the building is there, and it was approved by the City, and those homes need to be sold.

SD: You’re right, the condos do need to be sold for the good of the Arts District and the city.  It has been my experience that people choose to live in the Arts District because of their love of surroundings.  Right now Museum Tower does not love its surroundings.  Five sales in three years is hardly something to beat your chest about.  Museum Tower is a fine building and there is a huge market for the condos, from  local as well as international buyers.  Sales are not going to increase until MT does something pro-actively about this. The problem has always been the skin of the building.

When Graham Greene sold the land to the original MT developers it was with the understanding that any structure built on the site would have height restrictions and would not use reflective glass.  Graham is an architect and as such thinks about things like light and the surroundings.  I can’t imagine the powers that be at MT didn’t know this was going to be a problem

CD: So what is a solution ?

SD: The solutions are expensive for sure.  But as it stands this 200+ million dollar building is completed and sitting mostly empty.  For a moment Museum Tower need to not think about commerce and commissions but instead think about what is good for the city it occupies. It is something that we try and teach our children at a very young age-do the right thing! Throwing in the golden rule wouldn’t hurt either.

Nasher roofGreg Greene, one of the developers of Museum Tower, has told Candace Carlisle at the Dallas Business Journal that “ownership wants to financially step up to fix the tower’s glare inside the galleries at the Nasher Sculpture Center.” But then he added, agreeing on a solution could take more time. And it looks as though that solution is the $5 million we told you last week that MT has offered to completely change out the Nasher’s roof. And also, note that Greene used the term “air space”:

“It’s an unfortunate set of circumstances, but those oculi are pointed right at our air space,” Greg Greene, a development partner at Dallas-based Turtle Creek Holdings Inc. told the Dallas Business Journal Tuesday during an exclusive tour of the property. “They were here first, but they don’t have the right to take someone’s air space,” Greene told me (Candace Carlisle). “Why isn’t theDallas Museum of Art complaining or anyone else complaining? Because they have a solid roof and they don’t have oculi pointed at our air space. That’s the problem and that’s what needs to be fixed.”

Recall Museum Tower officials presented a solution to foot the bill to reconfigure the oculi on the Nasher roof to point away from the new high-rise, which would essentially return the lighting in the Nasher to pre-Museum Tower conditions.Nasher rooftop

I caught up with Dallas agent Scott Deakins, who has sold a lot of Arts District condos, for his take on Museum Tower’s generous proposal, a proposal Greene told the DBJ would reduce profitability of the project somewhat.

CD: So Scott, you’ve been out of town, and you come back in and hear the news about Museum Tower’s offer to re-do essentially the Nasher’s roof. Were you surprised?

SD: It’s good to be back.  Paris says hi, btw!  No, I’m not surprised, this situation gets dumb and dumber. All you can do is roll your eyes.  Last year they asked the Nasher to grow taller trees ( to offset the glare) and now they want to replace the roof, which in itself is a significant architectural detail.  Give me a break.

CD: I’m particularly interested in your views since you have sold so many homes in the Arts District, and you live there (right?) This doesn’t seem reasonable to you? Why not?

SD: Yes, I live in the Arts District and no, it is not reasonable for a variety of reasons; why punish the victim in all of this?  The Nasher didn’t ask for this.

Also, this is not just hurting the museum part of the Nasher-what about the loss of the landscape in the sculpture garden?  What about the loss of the James Turrell Skyspace installation (see below).  This problem also affects Klyde Warren Park, drivers on Woodall Freeway. I have calls all the time from clients at One Arts complaining about the glare from the building from the morning (eastern) sun.  This is a 360 degree problem.

CD: You told me that a recent article in the New York Times by Wil Hylton almost mourned for Skyspace – and that everyone who wants to understand the function of light should read this: “One of my favorite Turrell pieces is the Skyspace “Tending (Blue),” which is inside a small stone building behind the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. To reach the piece, you pass through a Renzo Piano-designed building filled with northern light, then you cross the clean, clear lines of a landscape by Peter Walker. By the time you enter the Skyspace, the city of Dallas is long forgotten. I once lost the better part of a day inside, staring up as clouds lofted and flattened against the ceiling. But last year, a mirrored skyscraper went up nearby, reflecting glare into the building, killing plants in the garden and looming into view of the Skyspace. The museum had to close it.

SD: Yes! I wanted your followers, real estate developers and consumers, to see the New York Times piece because of the significant loss of the much loved James Turrell Skyspace thanks to the intrusion of Museum Tower.  The loss is permanent! Also, what are readers of the Times all over the world going to take away from this article about Dallas – that selling condos is more important than our culture and love of the arts? My point is MT is hurting ALL aspects of the Nasher, not just the building.

CD: But the building is there, and it was approved by the City, and those homes need to be sold.

SD: You’re right, the condos do need to be sold for the good of the Arts District and the city.  It has been my experience that people choose to live in the Arts District because of their love of surroundings.  Right now Museum Tower does not love its surroundings.  Five sales in three years is hardly something to beat your chest about.  Museum Tower is a fine building and there is a huge market for the condos, from  local as well as international buyers.  Sales are not going to increase until MT does something pro-actively about this. The problem has always been the skin of the building.

When Graham Greene sold the land to the original MT developers it was with the understanding that any structure built on the site would have height restrictions and would not use reflective glass.  Graham is an architect and as such thinks about things like light and the surroundings.  I can’t imagine the powers that be at MT didn’t know this was going to be a problem

CD: So what is a solution ?

SD: The solutions are expensive for sure.  But as it stands this 200+ million dollar building is completed and sitting mostly empty.  For a moment Museum Tower need to not think about commerce and commissions but instead think about what is good for the city it occupies. It is something that we try and teach our children at a very young age-do the right thing! Throwing in the golden rule wouldn’t hurt either.