Photo by Jeff Mitchell

Photo by Jeff Mitchell

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Adriana Meyer, AIA, was born in Guatemala City and attended architecture school at Universidad Francisco Marroquín, graduating in 1999.

Adriana Meyer, AIA

Adriana Meyer, AIA

She started working on residential projects while still a student, and began her career at HKS Architects in Dallas in 2000, specializing in healthcare and assisted living. Some of her projects included Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta; St. Rose Hospital, Las Vegas; Lynn Cancer Center, Boca Raton, amongst others. She worked on many aspects of these projects, but specialized in planning and exterior design.

In 2007, she founded her own firm, APM Architecture. Meyer designed modern homes throughout Texas, working in Dallas neighborhoods like Kessler Woods, Highland Park, Forest Hills, and Bluffview, as well as Central Texas’ Hill Country and Oklahoma.

All have the common thread of being environmentally conscious with a modern aesthetic. In recent years she has designed a warehouse conversion to mixed use in the Dallas Design District. She is expanding into the commercial and assisted living markets.

CandysDirt: Your first professional work with HKS had you specializing in healthcare and assisted living. What drew you to that firm and that kind of architecture? 

Adriana Meyer: I was drawn to a large firm environment for my first job in Dallas, because I wanted experience working on major projects and learn as much as possible. Healthcare was a great learning experience. I worked on planning and design. I quickly learned that focusing on how complex spaces are used, creates the best solutions. How to collaborate with a team and how to listen to clients were two of the most important lessons I learned.

I am still interested in those projects, even if my practice today is more residential/small commercial. One of the goals of APM architecture is expanding my team to allow me to work on larger projects, perhaps including healthcare in the future.

 

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Robert Raymond

Photo: Michael Palumbo

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

Robert Raymond

Robert Raymond

Robert W. Raymond, AIA, moved to Dallas in 1981 after completing his Masters in Architecture at the University of Michigan. He has never lived more than a few blocks from White Rock Lake in East Dallas, where he built his family’s home and made the transition to residential architecture in 2000.

“The house turned out great and my wife and daughters are still speaking to me,” he said.

With his firm, Raymond Design, he has built houses in neighborhoods ranging from Preston Hollow and the Peninsula, to Richardson and Southlake.

He was named Young Architect of the Year in 1989 by the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architecture, served on the board of trustees of the Dallas Architectural Foundation from 2004 to 2006, and has served on the board of trustees of the White Rock Lake Conservancy from 2008 to present.

CandysDirt: You spent 20 years working on big buildings, like hotels and hospitals, moving into residential design in 2000 by designing and building your family house. What appeals to you about residential architecture?

Rob Raymond: There are two main reasons. First, the ability to work from beginning to end on a project, from the initial concept to final construction.

Second, and most rewarding, is working so closely with the client on projects that are near and dear to them. With corporate clients building hotels or hospitals, it’s a business transaction and commercial architecture, in a big firm, is more specialized and compartmentalized. You rarely get the chance to go from inception of idea to ribbon cutting.

With residential architecture, I’m usually working with couples and I joke that it’s part residential architecture and part marriage counseling. It’s fun to get to know people, understand them, and connect with them.

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Uptown condo

Dallas architect Ron Wommack has an impressive portfolio of contemporary residential designs, including the Mitchell Lofts, Buena Vista Townhomes, and Commerce Street Townhomes.

Today’s Tuesday Two Hundred is another of his designs in the 4111 Cole Condos, near Fitzhugh and Central Expressway. Unit 24 is 1,090 square feet with two bedrooms and two bathrooms in a prime location. 4111 Cole Condos is located steps away from Katy Trail, the Knox-Henderson shopping and entertainment district, and close to West Village.

The buildings of this Uptown condo have simple, clean lines, with a white and silver-colored palette. The community features include modern landscaping, a secure, gated entrance, swimming pool, and large wood deck with lounge chairs.

Uptown condo

The interior of the condo reflects that contemporary feel, with open spaces, simple lines, and modern lighting and details. There are light-colored wood floors in the main living areas, Carrera marble counters in the kitchen and bathrooms, and modern landscaping.

There are mandatory monthly HOA fees of $308, which include access to the pool, blanket insurance, exterior maintenance, front yard maintenance, water, and sewer.

It is listed by Emily Ray Porter with Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate for $230,000.

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A photo of Larry Pachall's own home, which was recently renovated. Photo: Larry Paschall

Larry Pachall’s own home, which was recently renovated to make the kitchen larger, among other things. Photo: Larry Paschall

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the first one here).

Larry Paschall

Larry Paschall

Larry Paschall, AIA, is Vice President and founding member at HPD Architecture, an architecture and interior design firm located in Dallas focusing on residential architecture. Since their inception in December 2007, HPD has focused on new construction, renovations, and additions for private residences primarily in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

He’s also the unofficial ambassador for the Dallas architecture community as a co-founder of The Architecture Happy Hour, a monthly networking event that brings together hundreds of professionals from a wide array of businesses, including architecture, design, and real estate, as well as design enthusiasts and a host of other people.

The event followed the launch of The Architecture Happy Hour podcast. He and HPD colleague Laura Davis, AIA, started the podcast in November 2009, which has 48 entertaining, educational episodes on topics ranging from “Can I Be My Own General Contractor?” to the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge and Dallas’ need for brand-name architecture.

Paschall earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design degree from Texas A&M University and lives in the White Rock Lake area of Dallas with his husband and two basset hounds. In his spare time, he serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors for the North Texas GLBT Chamber of Commerce, and as a board member for their charitable organization, the Leadership Education & Advocacy Program.

CandysDirt.com: You are the co-organizer of the highly acclaimed The Architecture Happy Hour, which just celebrated its fifth anniversary. What made you decide to start it?

Larry Paschall: We needed one because in 2010, we were a firm that nobody knew and we needed a way to help build a network of people that we could reach out to in the community.

At the same time, it was an opportunity to tell everyone “come to this event because it’s a very smart thing to do.” We noticed that the only people architects wanted to network with are other architects. The happy hour is a chance to meet other people who would be excellent referral sources and contacts down the line. I know three Realtors who can tell me what’s happening in the market, for example. This is information that might be vital to what we do as an architect. And because we know all these people, we can better serve our clients because we are better plugged into the community.

People are seeing the value of building connections. There’s a metalworker from Waco who comes, and an interior designer from Oklahoma City who schedules her time in the Design District to coincide with the happy hour. There’s a stylist, and for him, it’s become a social gathering. 

The next one is April 15 at Fashion Glass & Mirror in the Design District’s Trinity Lofts Building. People should register and RSVP on our Meetup site so we have a head count for beer, wine, and nibbles.

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8676 Langdale AHidden in East Lake Highlands near Northwest Highway and Plano Road is one of the largest collections of modern houses in Dallas, and some are still affordable, like the listing at 8676 Langdale Circle.

Designed by architect Jack R. Yardley and built in 1976, this looker is listed by Brandon Stewart with David Griffin & Company for $360,000.

Located on a corner lot in the secluded enclave of Mediterranean Gardens, this house is a 2-2 with 1,795 square feet, designed by Yardley for his then mother-in-law while he lived next door. (more…)

Mockingbird June 4

We’ve reported on this incredible box-like residence on Mockingbird in Highland Park, a home that caused some friction with neighbors thanks to its unique design and use of materials. With a building envelope you’d most often find covering a warehouse and some really innovative use of natural materials, Russell Buchanan’s “Mockingbird House” caught the eyes of AIA Dallas, which gave the home an Honor Award.

IMG_1177

The house is a two-story, 4,140-square-foot home that is basically a rectangular box served by a vestibule that, when lit up at night, glows amber thanks to the onyx slab construction. The owners, whose trade is in wholesale stone, used several different types of granite, quartz, and marble in the home’s construction.

Buchanan, who likened the home to a giant refrigerator box, says the insulated panels provide a construction efficiency that is unmatched, and have the added benefit of providing sound-dampening properties that keep the home quiet despite the busy street just outside.

When I toured this home during a Dallas Architecture Forum event, what really struck me was the versatility that this type of construction could lend. And considering that the home was pretty much finished in a year, well, that’s incredibly fast for a well-insulated home.

Congratulations to Buchanan for his forward-thinking design!

 

Mockingbird June 4

We’ve reported on this incredible box-like residence on Mockingbird in Highland Park, a home that caused some friction with neighbors thanks to its unique design and use of materials. With a building envelope you’d most often find covering a warehouse and some really innovative use of natural materials, Russell Buchanan’s “Mockingbird House” caught the eyes of AIA Dallas, which gave the home an Honor Award.

IMG_1177

The house is a two-story, 4,140-square-foot home that is basically a rectangular box served by a vestibule that, when lit up at night, glows amber thanks to the onyx slab construction. The owners, whose trade is in wholesale stone, used several different types of granite, quartz, and marble in the home’s construction.

Buchanan, who likened the home to a giant refrigerator box, says the insulated panels provide a construction efficiency that is unmatched, and have the added benefit of providing sound-dampening properties that keep the home quiet despite the busy street just outside.

When I toured this home during a Dallas Architecture Forum event, what really struck me was the versatility that this type of construction could lend. And considering that the home was pretty much finished in a year, well, that’s incredibly fast for a well-insulated home.

Congratulations to Buchanan for his forward-thinking design!