Last week, Becky Frey, a 17-year veteran at Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s who once told me she learned the real estate craft from Ellen Terry herself, joined Compass.

“It was a really big, hard decision,” says Becky. “I watched Compass evolve over the year, and it was just a good match for our team. The Sotheby’s brand was a big part of my career, and I have friends everywhere with Sotheby’s.”

But it was, she says, like leaving home: “Briggs Freeman was family to me and always will be, but moving to Compass was just a business decision for the team.”

Becky’s migration now sets Compass Dallas’ total agent count at 168 licensed. Compass has taken ALL local brokerages by storm, part of the significant disruption in the DFW real estate market we expected given our growth and sizzling hot market, and as Wall Street set its sights on the real estate industry. Why? Because the U.S. real estate industry is huge: the total value of all homes in the U.S. increased in 2017 to $31.8 trillion, according to Zillow. At least $89 billion is Realtor commissions alone. And because the industry has so many separate sub-markets (mortgage loans, title companies, insurance, construction) many forsee a way to unite and leverage the entire supply chain to feed consumer’s growing demand for convenience and one-stop shopping, like the ibuying trend:

Venture capitalists are practically throwing funds at real estate-related companies of all shapes, sizes and flavors. Nothing is sacred — brokerage models, commissions, transaction management, bundled services like title and lending. You name it, someone somewhere is trying to change it, fund it, and ultimately, capitalize on it. Every aspect of the real estate business is under scrutiny. There’s just too much money involved for real estate not to be targeted by those with deep pockets — and big ambitions to stuff those pockets full of cold, hard cash.

Outsiders have been marching into the Dallas market at a steady stream for a slice of our market pie. According to RealTrends top 10 largest brokerages in the United States, ranked by closed sales volume for 2018, Compass is number 6, right under Pacific Union. But the report needs to be updated: Compass bought Pacific Union in late August. According to Inman, Compass has more than tripled its agent count and now has more than 7,000 agents. The company also expects it will hit roughly $34 billion in sales volume this year, more than doubling its 2017 sales mark of $14.8 billion. That figure could firmly place Compass, which launched around 2014 as Urban Compass in NYC, at No. 3 on the Real Trends 500 in sales volume, right behind NRT and HomeServices of America.

Right behind NRT and Berkshire Hathaway Home Services of America. (more…)

Every Thursday, we bring you our pick of the hottest North Texas properties in our CandysDirt.com Open Houses of the Week. These are the places you don’t want to miss that weekend.

This week, our houses range in price from $350,000 to $899,000. Which ones will you visit?

 

(more…)

The day is not yet over and there is more news about high producing agents migrating to different brokers.

Allie Beth Allman & Associates announced today that the top-producing Susan Baldwin Group, led by Susan Baldwin, has joined Allie Beth Allman & Associates, “building on the luxury real estate boutique’s strong foundation of client service, cutting-edge marketing and entrepreneurship.”

“I’ve admired Susan for years, and I’m excited her team is joining the ABA family,” said CEO Allie Beth Allman. “We’re fortunate to have a leader who is so focused on delivering for her clients, and we welcome her entrepreneurial spirit.”

Susan’s team includes agents Fiona Richards and Missy Townsend.

(more…)

splurge vs. stealHomes in the Highland Park ISD attendance zone are often sought after by families buying homes. But those homes can come with a hefty price tag, too.

Our Splurge vs Steal this week looks at two homes in the district’s attendance zone. Both have at least three bedrooms and are at least 2,200 square feet. Which one is your favorite?

(more…)

Gracious, upscale living has a new address in the heart of Dallas, with easy access to the Katy Trail, the Arts District, high-end shopping, and some of the city’s finest restaurants. 

Live above it all at the Residences at the Stoneleigh with dramatic views of downtown, a lush greenbelt, sunrises, and sunsets from your balcony at ​2300 Wolf St. The 22-story building is nestled between historic Turtle Creek and the energy of Uptown and offers a rare opportunity to totally customize a luxury high-rise unit. 

Floorplans range from 2,400 square feet to over 4,200 square feet of shell space — buyers can even combine units to create a home up to 15,000 square feet.

“It’s the perfect way to have total control over the design/build process and each shell will be hand-crafted by one Dallas’ finest homebuilders, TriArc Construction and Sharif & Munir,” said Stoneleigh Sales and Marketing Manger Donna Smith. “We’ve already sold over 60 percent of available units to buyers who understand what a one-of-a-kind property this is in Dallas.” 

Also available: turn-key, designer-finished homes with all of the details already in place in one of four floorplans. Buyers can work with their preferred interior designer or a recommended designer to select the perfect furnishings, too. Move-in ready homes mean the Residences at the Stoneleigh lifestyle can become a reality all the sooner. 

Now, I can’t go any further without mentioning the fabulous amenities! Jump to read all about them. 

(more…)

Splurge vs Steal: Two M-Streets Tudor Houses | CandysDirt.com

In Greenland Hills, we love the sight of a M-Streets Tudors, and the neighborhood doesn’t disappoint. Many appealing options line the streets. 

In today’s Splurge vs Steal, we’re looking at two of these houses, each one a delight. Bonus for families: both schools are in the attendance zone for the beloved Stonewall Jackson Elementary. Let’s take a look. 

 

(more…)

Kyle Crews (Urban Team/McKenzie), Meredith Leyendecker (Talley Dunn), Talley Dunn, Anne Crews (Kyle’s wife), Katy Tomaszczuk (McKenzie), Tammy Gribble (Urban Team/McKenzie), Sanders Avrea (Urban Team/McKenzie) and Trini Martinez (Talley Dunn)

If we have not told you before, we are telling you now: we are living differently in Dallas.

Baby boomers are leaving their large homes, shedding the most square footage consumption in the history of the world. No other generation has lived in such grand homes as have the Boomers. And when it comes time to exit those grand homes for downsized living, many living “the transition” are not sure that they want to buy a condo. They love the concept of less maintenance, smaller living spaces, and reduced clutter, but fear they may miss a home.

Enter the McKenzie, a new truly luxury apartment complex by StreetLights Residential that will be the first truly luxury high rise apartment in North Texas. 

“You won’t feel like you’re in an apartment,” says Kyle Crews, whose Allie Beth Allman Urban team is marketing the 183 unit building on Harvard, across the street from Allie Beth Allman’s world headquarters, just steps from the Katy Trail.  “The finish out is going to have a huge custom feel, and this is a perfect option for homeowners who are not yet completely sold on high rise living.”

The building will be complete this summer, but leases have already been signed, including one for a penthouse apartment.

The McKenzie’s neighbors — Javier’s, Talley Dunn Gallery, and Allie Beth Allman & Associates threw a Cinquo de Mayo celebration for their new neighbor last Saturday at Talley Dunn Gallery. Javier’s provided food and margaritas. The event was also a chance to view the work of two giant artists at the gallery, Joseph Glasco and Helen Altman. Jump for more event photos and take in the amazing art…

(more…)

Kevin Tally, a Dallas-based agent with more than a decade of North Texas real estate experience, recently joined Allie Beth Allman and Associates after spending the past three years at Rogers Healy and Associates.

Tally is one of the youngest “veterans” in the Dallas market. He earned his real estate license 10 years ago while still a high schooler in Fort Worth. Despite being accepted into both the University of Texas and TCU, he chose to forgo college and go to work in his hometown.

“I started thinking about it and said, ‘you know what? If I go to college, I’m going to get back into this field anyway because I really love real estate, construction, architecture and all of that,’” he said. “I took the summer off and then I started hustling.”

(more…)