The living room of a Meadowood Estate designed by Mary Anne Smiley.

The living room of a Meadowood Estate designed by Mary Anne Smiley

Mary Anne Smiley had big plans for herself as a young woman. During childhood, she began drawing house plans and dreamed of a career in architecture.

Several years later, she tried to begin architecture studies at Oklahoma State University. But it was the 1960s, and the dean informed her, “Women do not enroll in architecture.”

Mary Anne Smiley

Mary Anne Smiley

That unfortunate turn of events led her to a different kind of adventure—she decided instead to study interior design and fine art. This began a successful career as an interior designer, and today, Smiley is recognized her as one of the top designers in Dallas. She received a Best of Houzz 2014 award for service, and a Best of Houzz 2015 award for design.

“I went to college with the intention of being an architect, but I am so glad the dean told me women could not enroll in architecture, as I think that would have been so limiting for me,” Smiley said. “I also wanted to be an artist so bad, but realized I did not have the raw talent required for that at that time—during the 60s, if you were not angry, and interested in phallic symbols, you did not have what it took! I think all-in-all, I landed just where I needed to be.”

Smiley’s love of bright color made her a pioneer of its use in Dallas interior design, and a signature of hers is bright spots of pure color against soft pearl-finish backgrounds. She’s also known for her ability to mix antiques and lavish textiles with cutting-edge products, from metallics to recycled plastics.

“I love to mix elements,” she said. “For instance, in the Highland Park contemporary study, for the desk, I used two contemporary chrome bases for a custom acrylic ‘tray’ top with honey onyx insert. The unique thing about this desk that you do not see, is that the onyx has a hollow space that encompasses an LED light grid that lights the onyx top without any evidence of a light source or wiring, as the wiring is concealed inside the chrome base, running directly into the floor, with the transformer for the lighting mounted beneath the floor.”

Today, she brings her talents to clients with her company, Mary Anne Smiley Interiors, creating carefully curated spaces for a range of clients. Her work is simply stunning.

(more…)

Marco French & meRemember when I told you the 19th floor of Museum Tower was recently divinely decorated by Marco French and Allan Knight to be debuted in the first DALLAS episode of the year on January 28? The rooms were also debuted in Modern Luxury Dallas‘ HOME Magazine, Jan issue.

Well, didja catch a glimpse last night?

Turns out it is the diva den of Pamela Rebecca Sutter Barnes Ewing, Sutter being I guess her fake last name. Rebecca is Cliff Barnes’ daughter, only she revealed Jan. 28 that she was also named after her aunt, Pamela Barnes Ewing, who was married to Bobby and played by the gorgeous Victoria Principal. Pamela-Rebecca (played by Julie Gonzalo) even looks a little like Principal. Well, though Pamela-Rebecca is pregnant with Ewing twins, Museum Tower still managed to be the place where she had some hot, heavy action with John Ross up there on floor 19.ustv-victoria-principal Original Dallas cast

I fully expect the folks at Museum Tower to put a premium price on that unit now that some star action has taken place up there. I hear we will see a lot more of Museum Tower in future Dallas episodes.

As I told you, the DALLAS producers toured all three of the designer units, loved Marco’s the best. They created a dramatic home for Pamela-Rebecca where she could watch over her kingdom, Dallas.

museumtower_flip

Actually, this may give us a solution to the Museum Tower-Nasher glare problem. If Cliff Barnes is involved, you know there was some conniving. I bet Barnes is behind this whole glare battle. We know how Barnes operates: he changed the chemistry on the MT glass because he’s trying to burn the Nasher out of it’s home. You guessed it: there’s oil there under the Sculpture Garden, he knows it, and Barnes wants to get his thick paws all over it.

 

Marco French & meRemember when I told you the 19th floor of Museum Tower was recently divinely decorated by Marco French and Allan Knight to be debuted in the first DALLAS episode of the year on January 28? The rooms were also debuted in Modern Luxury Dallas‘ HOME Magazine, Jan issue.

Well, didja catch a glimpse last night?

Turns out it is the diva den of Pamela Rebecca Sutter Barnes Ewing, Sutter being I guess her fake last name. Rebecca is Cliff Barnes’ daughter, only she revealed Jan. 28 that she was also named after her aunt, Pamela Barnes Ewing, who was married to Bobby and played by the gorgeous Victoria Principal. Pamela-Rebecca (played by Julie Gonzalo) even looks a little like Principal. Well, though Pamela-Rebecca is pregnant with Ewing twins, Museum Tower still managed to be the place where she had some hot, heavy action with John Ross up there on floor 19.ustv-victoria-principal Original Dallas cast

I fully expect the folks at Museum Tower to put a premium price on that unit now that some star action has taken place up there. I hear we will see a lot more of Museum Tower in future Dallas episodes.

As I told you, the DALLAS producers toured all three of the designer units, loved Marco’s the best. They created a dramatic home for Pamela-Rebecca where she could watch over her kingdom, Dallas.

museumtower_flip

Actually, this may give us a solution to the Museum Tower-Nasher glare problem. If Cliff Barnes is involved, you know there was some conniving. I bet Barnes is behind this whole glare battle. We know how Barnes operates: he changed the chemistry on the MT glass because he’s trying to burn the Nasher out of it’s home. You guessed it: there’s oil there under the Sculpture Garden, he knows it, and Barnes wants to get his thick paws all over it.

 

Here’s the thing about Museum Tower: you could buy here and never nail one piece of art to the walls because your views are your art! From 1800 square feet to the 9,000 square foot penthouse — who will buy that? Here is the smallest model, 2800 square feet of French art deco from 1930’s France with super clean lines and ebony wood. Marco French pulled in Donald Judd, Allan Knight and Nancy Corzine to fill a 2800 square foot residence designed to show buyers how the simplicity and elegance of the space does not have to interfere with anything they might own. It can, he says, house anyone’s tastes and collection and many, many rich colors. (Or none at all when you’ve got that vibrant red across the street!) This is a modern building that is not cold and sterile; it is warm, inviting and yes, antiques feel right at home. Very much at home, like the yummy fabric on these chairs. French has also said the building is so beautifully proportioned that even the “smallest” units do not seem small. His 2800 square foot model is one of the smallest, and at $800 a square foot will only set you back $2.2 million, but with the incredible expanse of glass — even the balconies are sliding sheets of glass with no joints, no baseboards–  rooms seem endless. At night, the inside and outside just blend together and it is really like living in the sky. With art, or no art!