Californians Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop Moving To Texas

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West Coasters flock to the Lone Star State, three DFW municipalities are among the best college cities in America, and Conor Commercial will bring an industrial project to Mesquite, all in this week’s roundup of real estate news.

West Coasters flock to the Lone Star State, three DFW municipalities are among the best college cities in America, and Conor Commercial will bring an industrial project to Mesquite, all in this week’s roundup of real estate news.

Californians Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop Moving To Texas

We must be doing something right in the Lone Star State.

Recent research published by STORAGECafe shows that more than 564,000 people moved to Texas last year.

Some of the major findings, issued in a press release, include:

  • 1,545 people per day settled in Texas last year, with Harris County seeing the greatest influx from out of state than any other region.
  • The primary origin of newcomers to Texas was, not surprisingly, California, which accounted for no less than 15 percent out of the total number of new residents. With moving costs starting at $3,700 per move, this migration route is not only the busiest but also one of the most expensive in the country based on data.
  • Even with 462,140 people moving away from Texas in the same time frame, the state is still a gainer in terms of net migration.
  • Texans’ favorite outbound destination is also California, with 37,810 people moving out there, compared to more than double – 86,164 – moving in from California.
  • Overall, the national trend is for people to move south, targeting the seashore and lower taxes.

Source: STORAGECafe

Dallas, Plano, McKinney Are Among Best College Cities

Most of us have a special place in our hearts for the city where we had our first real job, earned a diploma, and found the best slice of pizza for just a dollar.

WalletHub took on the challenge of finding the best college towns and cities in America – and three DFW communities made the cut.

Austin took the top spot and Houston came in at No. 30.

Dallas was 23rd in the large city ranking (more than 300,000 people). Plano and McKinney ranked 16th and 22nd in mid-size cities (between 125,000 and 300,000 people).

“Texas dominated the lowest cost of living for young people metric, taking four of the five spots,” said financial writer Adam McCann. “Cities are No. 1 Edinburg, No. 3 Laredo, No. 4 McAllen, and No. 5 Wichita Falls. Laredo has the second-lowest cost of higher education.”
WalletHub examined 415 cities of varying sizes in 31 metrics across three key dimensions: wallet friendliness, social environment, and academic and economic opportunities, to determine their findings.

Source: WalletHub

Conor Commercial To Develop Mesquite Industrial Project

Conor Commercial Real Estate recently acquired 12.4 acres for an industrial project with immediate proximity to Interstate 30 and U.S. 80 in Mesquite.

Cadence McShane is general contractor for the Skyline Commerce Park, which will include a 135,200-square-foot building with 32-foot clear heights and a 62,400 square-foot building with 28-foot clear heights.

The project also is slated to include 258 parking spaces and additional trailer parking.

Construction is set to begin by the end of the year and is slated for completion by the fourth quarter of 2020.

Source: REBusiness Online

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April Towery

April Towery studied journalism at Texas A&M University and has been an award-winning reporter and editor for more than 20 years. She’s covered everything from city council meetings to Death Row executions. Her favorite things to write are feature stories and humorous columns. She loves to make people laugh. She won first place in humorous column writing, second place in news writing and third place in serious column writing at the 2019 South Texas Press Association Awards and picked up first place in humorous writing at the 2018 Texas Press Association awards ceremony. She has numerous other recognitions, including the Texas Associated Press Managing Editors’ first-place award for special reporting, citing her continuous coverage of the College Station City Council and its violation of the Texas Open Meetings Act in 2006. She is the daughter of a longtime real estate appraiser and at one time knew her way around a floor plan. She lives in Wylie and is learning daily about real estate, architecture, and housing trends.

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