R.I.P. 10300 Strait Lane: 1971 – 2015

10300 Strait Lane ext

Comes word that the tear down of the Bud Oglesby home at 10300 Strait came sooner rather than later.

In fact, she is gone, her body laid to a fitful rest somewhere in Lewisville …

Bud O 1

 

10300 Strait grounds

10300 Strait Lane grounds 1She was born in 1971 and built with wide galleries for art display connecting three main wings, all surrounding a central courtyard. The sitting room off the master had a fireplace and viewed the pond: you know Oglesby on his perfect sitings.. There were four additional bedrooms each with en suite baths. The kitchen was in the rear with a butlers pantry, laundry room, den, another fireplace and wet bar. The estate also has a pool and tennis court, maybe saved? There were a 3 car garage, and 2 room of quarters.

The home is survived by three owners, Margaret Jonsson Rogers, Erik Jonsson’s daughter, who commissioned Oglesby, the Dedmans, and the McReynolds.

The lot is probably the most desirable on Strait Lane, sitting in the middle of the street, selected back when the area was virgin, home-less land, ponies roaming and no waterparks.

 

10300 Strait Lane patio

10300 Strait Lane pool

 

10300 Strait Lane living area 1

10300 Strait Lane living area 2

10300 Strait Lane breakfast

 

10300 Strait Lane loggia

 

10300 Strait Lane hall

 

10300 Strait Lane study

10300 Strait was designed and built by one of the city’s most influential, historical architects, owned by two of the city’s most philanthropic families, sited on acreage that was once considered the country but now very much within the city. It has enjoyed lifeas an elegant, tasteful mansion, without gobbling up the land with unnecessary square footage.

The new owners brought in the heavy equipment last week and trucks were hauling away the remains of the house since Wednesday.

Word is the new owners have had two houses designed for their empty mega-lot next door, the former Chateau De Triumphe, 9 plus acres, both of which got to the point where a general contractor was selected and construction bids were sought, then the McReynolds changed their minds. Now there is apparently a new house plan for the new lot moving forward. The Dallas Design District is all a scuttle about the owners, because they have started buying furniture for the never-built houses.
10300 Strait Lane master
10300 Strait Lane master window
10300 Strait study 2
10300 Strait sitting

12 Comment

  • Such is the North Dallas Way.
    I remember when my parents sold their home near Preston and Walnuthill in 1984. The new owners paid over $400K and promptly tor the place down. The home was only 21 years old and in perfect shape. We thought the people were crazy! Now, such practices are common in the area.

  • mm

    I am such a mess over this. Just brings tears to my eyes to see such a loss!

  • Wow, just looked at the pics of the old place on Trulia. So beautiful. If their first inclincation was to bulldoze that place, I can only imagine how tacky the new home is going to look. Vomit.

  • Clearly the new owner has a ton of money but not an ounce of taste.

  • This is sad indeed…..can’t imagine what would compel someone with an ounce of taste to destroy such a lovely structure. Well, I guess I just answered my question. No doubt the new house will be a gross pseudo-baronial monstrosity designed to impart “class” and status to the new hillbilly owners……and Dallas will fall all over these folks simply because they spent a lot of dough. It makes me want to puke.

  • Its very sad that this has happened.

    But, this is NOT a Dallas thing – this happens all over the US – from the the tip of Long Island ( where the old Any Warhol 30+acre estate was just listed and is sure to be replaced) to the shores of California

    The word is the owners own the property to the north and they only plan to use this property for landscaped gardens.

  • Such a very sad ending for such a lovely home. It would be a dream home for many people but yet is nothing but a tear down for the new owners of the property.

  • What a waste! This home was absolutely magnificent and architecturally beautiful. I can’t believe it was torn down, probably for a horrific McMansion. It’s a sad day.

  • It is very sad when a significant, beautiful piece of history bites the dust. Iconic homes bite the dust every day, sadly, and no one notices. Thanks for sharing this. I’ve seen that home. I’ve lusted over that home and now I will mourn its passing. Keep up the good work Candy!

  • This makes me so sad. This was a wonderful house beautifully sited.