Want to Represent Your Neighborhood? First, You Have to Get Your Name on Ballot

Voters across the Dallas area will go to the polls on May 9 to elect mayor, city council members, and school district trustees. If you want your name to appear on a ballot, you should know that the filing period for candidates begins today. (Photo by iStock)

Voters across the Dallas area will go to the polls on May 9 to elect mayors, city council members, and school district trustees. If you want your name to appear on a ballot, you should know that the filing period for candidates begins today. (Photo by iStock)

One way to ensure that your property values stay high is to get involved in your community. For example, you could represent your neighborhood on the city council or school board.

Of course, you’d have to convince your neighbors that you’re worthy of their votes. But that comes later. First, you need to get on the ballot. And today is the first day to file a candidacy for the municipal elections that will be held across the Dallas area on May 9.

Here’s a look at which seats are likely to be contested in the neighborhoods where our readers live and work:

Dallas City Council

Six incumbents will be leaving the council due to term limits, including Sheffie Kadane, whose District 9 includes most of East Dallas, and Jerry Allen, who represents District 10, a.k.a. Lake Highlands. The race to replace Kadane is getting crowded, as five people have already appointed campaign treasurers; two people have already done so in District 10. Word to the wise: If you’re going to serve on the City Council, D Magazine founder Wick Allison has high expectations for you.

Dallas ISD Board of Trustees

Three seats will be on the ballot, including District 1, which covers most of Preston Hollow and North Dallas. The district’s current trustee, Elizabeth Jones, has not publicly declared that she’s running for a second term, but her predecessor, Edwin Flores, has thrown his hat back in the ring.

District 3, which includes neighborhoods east and north of White Rock Lake, is represented by Dan Micciche. So far, he has no competition. But the filing period for all of the May 9 elections doesn’t close until Feb. 27.

Richardson ISD Board of Trustees

Micciche doesn’t represent Lake Highlands, because that neighborhood is actually part of Richardson ISD. Places 1 and 2 on that school district’s board — which are held by vice president Adam Meierhofer and president Kim Caston, respectively — will be on the ballot, but district residents can run for any seat, no matter where they live.

Highland Park ISD Board of Trustees

If you’d like to wade into the controversies over banned books and overcrowded schools, one trustee’s seat is completely up for grabs. School board president Leslie Melson has decided not to run for re-election after serving three terms. Vice president Jim Hitzelberger’s seat will also be on the ballot, but he is expected to seek a third term. Prepare to hear some jokes on the campaign trail.

As in Richardson ISD, Highland Park ISD candidates must declare which seat they are seeking, but anyone who lives within the school district can run for any of them.