Friday Five Hundred: Get a View of White Rock Lake From This Renovated Clifford Hutsell Cottage

Lakewood is home to so many great homes by incredible architects. Street after street, block after block, you’ll see gorgeous historic houses with outstanding details. If you manage to find a home for sale designed by one of these architects and has a view of the lake, well, that’s a great stroke of luck.

Today’s Friday Five Hundred has both. The house, 7327 Lakewood Blvd., was designed by Clifford Hutsell and has a great view of White Rock Lake from the second-story balcony. There are three bedrooms, two baths, and more than enough outdoor space. It’s marketed by Scott Carlson and priced at $595,000.

Coming in at 1,848 square feet, this is the kind of home that I would usually say speaks for itself in photographs. That’s why I was a little disappointed by this listing, which has poorly lit photos from weird angles. It almost looks like they were taken with an iPhone as an afterthought.

It’s a shame, really, because this beauty has been largely remodeled but with many of the hand-scraped plaster walls left intact. There are beautiful stained-glass windows and gorgeous ironwork throughout the home. The backyard has an amazing covered patio, and would be great for entertaining.

This well-preserved beauty has access to the incredible schools that Lakewood has to offer, including Woodrow Wilson High School.

Still, though, I can’t fight that nagging feeling that this home is so much more amazing in person. What do you think? Do photos make or break a listing?

 

 

12 Comment

  • That looks like a great house; unbeatable location. Also, as you note, some architectural interest. Not much space, though.

    Yes, I think photos do make a great impact. The house my wife and I sold earlier this year had great photos–so great that I think people who arrived were a little disappointed (some rooms were made to look bigger in the photos). At least it got enough people in the door to sell it.

    On the other hand, the listing for the home we purchased had pictures of an apartment building instead of the actual house at first. Then, once corrected, the actual pictures were underwhelming. We think this helped us have our offer accepted, as people were not scrambling to see it as much. After the sellers accepted our offer, several more offers came in.

  • That looks like a great house; unbeatable location. Also, as you note, some architectural interest. Not much space, though.

    Yes, I think photos do make a great impact. The house my wife and I sold earlier this year had great photos–so great that I think people who arrived were a little disappointed (some rooms were made to look bigger in the photos). At least it got enough people in the door to sell it.

    On the other hand, the listing for the home we purchased had pictures of an apartment building instead of the actual house at first. Then, once corrected, the actual pictures were underwhelming. We think this helped us have our offer accepted, as people were not scrambling to see it as much. After the sellers accepted our offer, several more offers came in.

  • NOT TO MENTION THE POWER LINES IN THE PHOTO WHICH TO SOME PEOPLE WITH CLASS, TOTALLY DESTROYS THE AESTHETIC LAKE VIEW OF MOST LAKEWOOD HOMES! I am forever amazed at so-called "society" in Lakewood/Highland Park who have spent millions on their home and hundreds of thousands on landscaping and are to cheap to have ugly power lines buried. Takes away and destroys the ambience of the designers work and shame on the designer for not insisting and doing same. Like looking at the Mona Lisa through a cracked window! Mostly tasteless, cheap, hillbilly Lakewood/Highland Park lawyer types with more money than class! Dallas so-called "great room" society always has been and always will be 4th class.

  • NOT TO MENTION THE POWER LINES IN THE PHOTO WHICH TO SOME PEOPLE WITH CLASS, TOTALLY DESTROYS THE AESTHETIC LAKE VIEW OF MOST LAKEWOOD HOMES! I am forever amazed at so-called "society" in Lakewood/Highland Park who have spent millions on their home and hundreds of thousands on landscaping and are to cheap to have ugly power lines buried. Takes away and destroys the ambience of the designers work and shame on the designer for not insisting and doing same. Like looking at the Mona Lisa through a cracked window! Mostly tasteless, cheap, hillbilly Lakewood/Highland Park lawyer types with more money than class! Dallas so-called "great room" society always has been and always will be 4th class.

  • OH YEAH! I wrote about this before it was renovated. It is a charmer and you can actually walk to the lake. It's still a heck of a deal for a Hutsell and Joanna you are right, the photos do not do it justice.
    There's a very cool room downstairs ( hope they saved the original floor!) and the balcony is wonderful.

  • OH YEAH! I wrote about this before it was renovated. It is a charmer and you can actually walk to the lake. It's still a heck of a deal for a Hutsell and Joanna you are right, the photos do not do it justice.
    There's a very cool room downstairs ( hope they saved the original floor!) and the balcony is wonderful.

  • Yikes Sloppy Mud Hole! I don't know who you know, but I know plenty of "classy" people in Lakewood and Highland Park. I think we all want power lines buried no matter where we live. It's a bit more complicated than you might think and it has absolutely nothing to do with "society" or " hillbillies and designers don't wield any power on this issue. It's definitely not about an individual being "cheap". Here's a link that has a some interesting discussions on the issue.

    http://www.city-data.com/forum/dallas/1021314-lakewood-question-oncor-trees.html

  • Yikes Sloppy Mud Hole! I don't know who you know, but I know plenty of "classy" people in Lakewood and Highland Park. I think we all want power lines buried no matter where we live. It's a bit more complicated than you might think and it has absolutely nothing to do with "society" or " hillbillies and designers don't wield any power on this issue. It's definitely not about an individual being "cheap". Here's a link that has a some interesting discussions on the issue.

    http://www.city-data.com/forum/dallas/1021314-lakewood-question-oncor-trees.html

  • I completely agree. Properties that have been photographed by professionals or even someone who has knowledge of unique angles and lighting, have more potential for interest and traffic from buyers. Additionally, the perceived value of properties can increase about 10-15%.

    I photograph properties in Dallas and my prices are extremely reasonable. Photos like this makes me wish I could reach out to more agents. That is one reason I’m active in this group. I love to help others sell.

    Evan Chavez, CPP

  • I completely agree. Properties that have been photographed by professionals or even someone who has knowledge of unique angles and lighting, have more potential for interest and traffic from buyers. Additionally, the perceived value of properties can increase about 10-15%.

    I photograph properties in Dallas and my prices are extremely reasonable. Photos like this makes me wish I could reach out to more agents. That is one reason I’m active in this group. I love to help others sell.

    Evan Chavez, CPP

  • We should start profiling Realtors on CD… great idea! And I'm going to do a post on powerlines… one of my pet peeves!

  • mm

    We should start profiling Realtors on CD… great idea! And I'm going to do a post on powerlines… one of my pet peeves!