With the advent of photo-heavy online listings visible from anywhere, video tours, and slideshows, many Realtors have already ordered a tombstone for the Open House. But should we start eulogizing a long-held practice that can give sellers much-needed feedback and turn looky-loos into serious buyers?

That’s the argument Brendon Desimone poses in his blog post, saying that serious buyers are developed over time, and just browsing listings online won’t sell them on one particular home.

“Open houses give buyers a no-pressure environment in which to deepen their education about the local market, so they can make a more informed decision,” Desimone says. “A buyer may use an open house as a first showing of the property. But when buyers become serious about a home, an open house provides them another opportunity to spend time in the home, to get to know it better, without the confines of a 15-minute private appointment.”

I agree with some of what Desimone says, but there are so many websites out there that break down important market information, giving buyers an economic outlook on a property long before they’re ready to commit. Trulia does a great job of this with its graphic interface and easily accessible message boards that facilitate discussion about neighborhoods. Let’s use our Friday Four Hundred, 5802 Monticello, for example. To the right you can see agents and potential buyers talking about the neighborhood at length — a wonderful resource for buyer education.

Trulia 5802 Monticello screenshot

 

Of course, what you don’t get from all of this buyer education is a feel for neighborhood traffic. Is this home near a noisy intersection? How close are you to shopping? Are there other families and pedestrians nearby? That’s where an open house really provides an added benefit. Buyers can linger, walk around the neighborhood, get a feel for their surroundings.

Of course, one open house is a lot easier to manage than a gazillion individual showings, says Desimone. Agreed, but it also opens the home to people who aren’t interested in buying at all, including neighbors and thieves, as Rogers Healy recently mentioned on Fox Business News’ The Willis Report. But they do give agents and sellers an opportunity to get some feedback on a listing, Desimone says.

“A good listing agent will want to see as many buyers come through as possible to gauge their reactions to the home,” he offers. “Are people walking in and out quickly? Or are they hanging around? What questions are they asking? What are their biggest hang-ups or concerns? This is the kind of valuable information you can’t get online.”

Agreed. You won’t get a lot of feedback from buyers who shop mostly online, and a seller’s agent won’t likely be at showings, so besides critiques from stagers and other agents, this is likely the only direct feedback sellers can get.

What do you think? Is the Open House a relic, or is it relevant?

With the advent of photo-heavy online listings visible from anywhere, video tours, and slideshows, many Realtors have already ordered a tombstone for the Open House. But should we start eulogizing a long-held practice that can give sellers much-needed feedback and turn looky-loos into serious buyers?

That’s the argument Brendon Desimone poses in his blog post, saying that serious buyers are developed over time, and just browsing listings online won’t sell them on one particular home.

“Open houses give buyers a no-pressure environment in which to deepen their education about the local market, so they can make a more informed decision,” Desimone says. “A buyer may use an open house as a first showing of the property. But when buyers become serious about a home, an open house provides them another opportunity to spend time in the home, to get to know it better, without the confines of a 15-minute private appointment.”

I agree with some of what Desimone says, but there are so many websites out there that break down important market information, giving buyers an economic outlook on a property long before they’re ready to commit. Trulia does a great job of this with its graphic interface and easily accessible message boards that facilitate discussion about neighborhoods. Let’s use our Friday Four Hundred, 5802 Monticello, for example. To the right you can see agents and potential buyers talking about the neighborhood at length — a wonderful resource for buyer education.

Trulia 5802 Monticello screenshot

 

Of course, what you don’t get from all of this buyer education is a feel for neighborhood traffic. Is this home near a noisy intersection? How close are you to shopping? Are there other families and pedestrians nearby? That’s where an open house really provides an added benefit. Buyers can linger, walk around the neighborhood, get a feel for their surroundings.

Of course, one open house is a lot easier to manage than a gazillion individual showings, says Desimone. Agreed, but it also opens the home to people who aren’t interested in buying at all, including neighbors and thieves, as Rogers Healy recently mentioned on Fox Business News’ The Willis Report. But they do give agents and sellers an opportunity to get some feedback on a listing, Desimone says.

“A good listing agent will want to see as many buyers come through as possible to gauge their reactions to the home,” he offers. “Are people walking in and out quickly? Or are they hanging around? What questions are they asking? What are their biggest hang-ups or concerns? This is the kind of valuable information you can’t get online.”

Agreed. You won’t get a lot of feedback from buyers who shop mostly online, and a seller’s agent won’t likely be at showings, so besides critiques from stagers and other agents, this is likely the only direct feedback sellers can get.

What do you think? Is the Open House a relic, or is it relevant?

6446 Glendora

Glendora seems to be the street du jour, no? And I love a good hip-pocket listing. It gives a property a certain exclusive cache, doesn’t it?

What’s better is a hip-pocket listing I love, and that’s 6446 Glendora. This home, built in 2001 by Hawkins Welwood, has 7,000 square feet of indoor space that manages to feel cozy, not cold. That’s thanks in part to the use of muted colors and natural finishes, and especially exposed wood beams.

6446 Glendora Sitting

This appointment-only, off-the-open-market listing is priced at almost $1.68 million with Dave Perry-Miller, which puts this home at almost $240 per square foot. You can tour this amazing home, along with a few other select properties from Dave Perry-Miller Fine Homes, on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m.

There are six bedrooms, six and a half baths, and plenty of room for your brood to spread out. The backyard has a great pool and spa, plus a loggia that’s great for dinners with close family and friends.

6446 Glendora Kitchen

The kitchen, while lovely, feels lik it’s missing something. I guess the wrought-iron light fixtures in the den and breakfast area make me feel as if the island should have a huge pot-rack strung above it. Instead, there is a pendant here or there and other task lighting, which plays up the beautiful cabinets. Still, it’s a purported problem that is easily fixed.

6446 Glendora Master Bath

The master suite has a five-piece bath with separate vanities — a wonderful feature for those among us who are not morning people. And there are windows, too, which hopefully don’t allow neighbors to gaze inside, but that’s nothing a little curtain won’t fix. Besides that, I love the French doors in the bedroom that not only let in so much light, but they also open to the backyard.

6446 Glendora Master

The backyard isn’t a tiny space, but given the size of the home, it’s not a large one. There’s plenty of room for entertaining in the 150-foot by 125-foot yard, which includes a great pool and grassy play area.

6446 Glendora Backyard

 

6446 Glendora

Glendora seems to be the street du jour, no? And I love a good hip-pocket listing. It gives a property a certain exclusive cache, doesn’t it?

What’s better is a hip-pocket listing I love, and that’s 6446 Glendora. This home, built in 2001 by Hawkins Welwood, has 7,000 square feet of indoor space that manages to feel cozy, not cold. That’s thanks in part to the use of muted colors and natural finishes, and especially exposed wood beams.

6446 Glendora Sitting

This appointment-only, off-the-open-market listing is priced at almost $1.68 million with Dave Perry-Miller, which puts this home at almost $240 per square foot. You can tour this amazing home, along with a few other select properties from Dave Perry-Miller Fine Homes, on Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m.

There are six bedrooms, six and a half baths, and plenty of room for your brood to spread out. The backyard has a great pool and spa, plus a loggia that’s great for dinners with close family and friends.

6446 Glendora Kitchen

The kitchen, while lovely, feels lik it’s missing something. I guess the wrought-iron light fixtures in the den and breakfast area make me feel as if the island should have a huge pot-rack strung above it. Instead, there is a pendant here or there and other task lighting, which plays up the beautiful cabinets. Still, it’s a purported problem that is easily fixed.

6446 Glendora Master Bath

The master suite has a five-piece bath with separate vanities — a wonderful feature for those among us who are not morning people. And there are windows, too, which hopefully don’t allow neighbors to gaze inside, but that’s nothing a little curtain won’t fix. Besides that, I love the French doors in the bedroom that not only let in so much light, but they also open to the backyard.

6446 Glendora Master

The backyard isn’t a tiny space, but given the size of the home, it’s not a large one. There’s plenty of room for entertaining in the 150-foot by 125-foot yard, which includes a great pool and grassy play area.

6446 Glendora Backyard

 

A what? Flywheel indoor cycling, as in stationary stadium bicycle cycling.

I know (groan) but let’s face it, fitness equals not just a cuter, tighter butt to run from open house to open house, but serious health improvement. Flywheel Sports, the experience crafted by Ruth Zukerman, legendary instructor and driving force behind the New York indoor cycling phenomenon, has landed in Dallas at The Shops of Highland Park, 4252 Oak Lawn across, oh so conveniently, from both Equinox and Eddie V’s.

Oh and these are not regular stationary bikes that make you feel like you have lost your virginity all over again. They are cool custom engineered bikes. The Flywheel indoor cycling ride includes climbs and descents, while working arms with weighted bars simultaneously  That’s important to me in my battle against lunch lady arms. And roof climbing.

Here is what they tell me: “It’s an amazing escape that challenges your body and relaxes your mind.”

Music playlists are choreographed to each class and make the time, 50 minutes, fly.

Hence the name, get it, fly-wheel.

Instructors suggest target resistance levels and RPM’s to strive for. But ultimately YOU decide what’s right for you by controlling the technology on your bike. So if you want to ramble down a country lane, ramble. Go all-out killer cycle czar, go for it. Performance stats are made available in your private account. Don’t have to share.

So here’s the deal. I am leading a FREE Flywheel class this Saturday morning at 10:30 am… at the brand butt-spanking new Flywheel at 4252 Oak Lane Ave. Class is free, so y’all come. We’ll gossip. We’ll fly! 

Send an RSVP by email, or be old fashioned and call, but be sure to mention “Candy’s Dirt” or “Candy’s Class” or “Candy’s Butt is Cooked” or something when sending in RSVPs. That sets you apart from the common folk –KIDDING!

RSVP – either flywheel@buzzellco.com or CALL 214.219.9191 x2

Get your fingers working as fast as your legs will be Saturday — space is very limited because of how loud my primal screams will be. (Kidding.)

Reservations will be accepted on a first come, first butt-burn basis.

So get OFF your butt and call, email, text. (Text?) We will sweat and have a blast. Wear hot pink. Plan on latte and yogurt apres, okay?

Best part: some lucky tush will receive a whole free month of Flywheel… and have the best butt in her neighborhood, qualifying her for a *guest post on Candy’sDirt.com.

*Subject to editing, of course.

 

 

Sometimes you see traces of what an older home used to look like through the slick veneer of fresh paint and new flooring. Perhaps the cabinets in the kitchen get a refacing and the paneling in a bedroom is stripped and recoated, but under decades of haphazard updating is a mystery.

If the anthropologist in you is always curious about these things, head over to 6509 Prince in Caruth Terrace on Sunday to check out a 1955 ranch in original condition for $334,900.

This house has four good-sized bedrooms and three baths, and totals more than 2,500 square feet. Other than your typical replacements — flooring, windows, sprinkler system, and I think one appliance — this home looks just like it did when it was purchased almost 60 years ago.

Each of the bathrooms, which have the original Daltile of course, have a different color scheme. The largest bathroom is a lovely combination of pink and gray, while the other bathrooms feature a more neutral cream and a pea soup/evergreen scheme.

In the backyard you’ll see a built-in grill and a carport with storage, but no garage. Want to see it in person? Head over to 6509 Prince on Sunday, Sept. 30, between 1 and 3 p.m.