Thomas Woltz and his firm, NBW, is designing the urban green space in New York City’s Hudson Yards project.

When Dallas thinks about public green space, the first thought that bubbles up is our scarcity of it. Sure, we’ve tried to bring more public spaces to our urban core with great, though expensive, outcomes. With a city whose built environment weighs heavily on the side of car culture, how do you add green space that adds value to pedestrian and commuter, alike? It’s a problem that renowned landscape architect Thomas Woltz has puzzled through, again and again. CandysDirt.com was afforded the unique opportunity to get Woltz’s perspective ahead of his 7 p.m. lecture with the Dallas Architecture Forum at the Dallas Museum of Art’s Horchow Auditorium.

Tickets for this lecture are $20 for general admission, $15 for DMA members, and $5 for students (with ID). Tickets can be purchased at the door before the lecture. No reservations are needed to attend Forum lectures. Dallas Architecture Forum members receive free admission to all regular Forum lectures as a benefit of membership, and AIA members can earn one hour of CE credit for each lecture. For more information on The Dallas Architecture Forum, visit www.dallasarchitectureforum.org or call 214-764-2406.

Thomas Woltz

As principal of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects (NBW), a 45-person firm based in Charlottesville, Virginia and New York City, Woltz has infused narratives of the land into the places where people live, work and play, deepening the public’s enjoyment of the natural world and inspiring environmental stewardship. NBW projects create models of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture within areas of damaged ecological infrastructure and working farmland, yielding hundreds of acres of reconstructed wetlands, reforested land, native meadows and flourishing wildlife habitat.

Presently, Thomas and NBW are entrusted with the design of major public parks across the United States, Canada and New Zealand. These projects include Memorial Park in Houston, Hudson Yards in New York City, NoMA Green in Washington DC, Cornwall Park in Auckland, the Aga Khan Garden in Alberta, Canada, and three parks in Nashville, including Centennial Park.

Centennial Park, Nashville, Tennessee

“Thomas Woltz has the unusual distinction of a being a landscape architect who has designed residential, corporate and public projects. He brings a unique approach to landscape design by pursuing thorough research to understand the ecology and history of an area as the basis for the design,” stated Forum executive director Nate Eudaly. “Because his goal is to move beyond just decorating the environment to improving the underlying eco-system and bringing forth the history of an area to create an identity that draws people from various backgrounds, he has been called a visionary and has attracted wide acclaim for his work.”

Woltz will speak today, Feb. 6 at 7 p.m., with check-in and a complimentary reception beginning at 6:15 p.m., at the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Keep reading for our exclusive Q&A with the visionary landscape architect:

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José Vasconcelos Library in Mexico City. Photo Courtesy of The Dallas Architecture Forum.

Celebrate architecture, design, and the urban environment alongside modern visionaries like internationally celebrated architect Alberto Kalach, Principal and Co-Founder of TAX Architects of Mexico City, September 11, 2018 at 7 p.m. at the Angelika Theatre at Mockingbird Station. The event is an exciting start to The Dallas Architecture Forum’s 2018-2019 season, and landing Kalach is a major coup for The Forum. He is an expert in the urban planning challenges of his native Mexico City – one of the largest cities in the world – which is of particular interest as Dallas attempts its first Comprehensive Housing Plan.

Alberto Kalach. Photo Courtesy of The Dallas Architecture Forum.

“Alberto Kalach is a visionary who has over thirty years of experience in studying the complex ecology and workings of his native Mexico City, one of the largest cities in the world. His work explores the balance of the needs of society with nature and history, and seeks to create equity among neighborhoods of varying income levels, and to seamlessly merge communities with their surrounding environments,” stated Forum Executive Director Nate Eudaly.

“We believe Mr. Kalach’s vast experience and insights in urban planning and the design of various building types will be of great interest as Dallas attempts to implement its first comprehensive housing program, and North Texas experiences continued growth as one of the largest metropolitan areas in North America.”

Kalach is also known as the designer of the award-winning José Vasconcelos Library in Mexico City, which is the largest public library in Latin America.

For art and design lovers: Mark your calendars for Carol Willis on September 25 at the Dallas Museum of Art. She is the Founder and Director of The Skyscraper Museum in New York City, and her presentation will be in conjunction with the Museum’s exhibition, Cult of the Machine: Precisionism and American Art. 

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