Photos showing some of the original details of this 1940 home by noted architect Charles Dilbeck, located at 5106 Milam Street in the Cochran Heights neighborhood. (Photo © Michael Hamtil)

This 1940 home by noted architect Charles Dilbeck, located at 5106 Milam Street in the Cochran Heights neighborhood, will be on the April 3 home tour. (Photo © Michael Hamtil)

Fans of Charles Dilbeck’s quirky, brick-and-timber aesthetic will probably already have tickets to the inaugural Cochran Heights Home Tour on Sunday, April 3, from 2 to 4 p.m.

The home tour, a fundraiser for the neighborhood, will help celebrate the brand new Texas Historical Commission marker signifying the tremendous collection of Dilbecks in this East Dallas neighborhood. You can come to the marker unveiling on Henderson Avenue at 1 p.m., and then head to the five incredible tour homes afterward.

Tickets are $15 in advance through the neighborhood website, or $20 the day of the tour. Or you could try your luck and enter to win one of two pairs of tickets we’re giving away right here on CandysDirt.com!

Jump to enter!

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Main Street Odessa

The 2014 Firecracker Fandango event is the largest fundraiser of the year for Main Street Odessa. Photo: Gloria Hernandez

Downtown Odessa is in the middle of a dramatic, ongoing revitalization designed to bolster economic development and preserve the historic treasures of the area.

As part of that change, the Odessa City Council voted last month to withdraw Main Street Odessa from the Texas Main Street program and instead rebrand it as Downtown Odessa, Incorporated, a 501(c)3 organization formed by the city in 2005.

“The evolution of Main Street Odessa began last year when the city of Odessa became their partner and a strong supporter of their mission to revitalize downtown Odessa,” said Gloria Hernandez, Executive Director of Main Street Odessa. “The focus on creating a viable economic center in downtown Odessa and our new partnership with the city is the reason for the rebranding.”

Read the whole story over on MidlandDirt.com!

 

 

The Davis Building, aka Republic National Bank Building, in downtown has Dallas Historic Landmark Designation. 1926 this structure was the tallest in Dallas. In 1945, this structure was the largest office site in Dallas. Photo: Davis Building.

Downtown Dallas’ Davis Building, aka Republic National Bank Building, has Dallas Historic Landmark Designation. In 1926 this structure was the tallest in Dallas. In 1945, it was the largest office site in Dallas. Photo: Davis Building.

Dallas has a rich historic and architectural legacy, shown through buildings like the Texas Theatre in Oak Cliff, DeGolyer House and Gardens in East Dallas, and the Eastside Warehouse District and State Thomas neighborhood in Uptown.

But just because a building or neighborhood plays an important part in the story of Dallas doesn’t mean it’s protected from big changes, up to and including demolishment.

Just last September, 1611 Main Street and neighboring buildings were razed as part of the Joule’s expansion plans. It was a beautiful Romanesque Revival built in 1885, one of downtown’s oldest structures. It sat next to the site of another Dallas landmark torn down by the Joule in 2012, the former Praetorian Building.

Lakewood Theater is another example of an unprotected structure—it may be beloved, but nothing stands between it and the wrecking ball besides the assurances of the owner that they won’t demolish as part of renovation plans.

That’s where historic designation comes into play and the efforts of Dallas preservationists to care for the future of the buildings and neighborhoods that have shaped what our city into what it is today.

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