new hampshireOnce a stagecoach stop between Concord, New Hampshire, and Hanover, Mink Pond Farm has a rich history of making travelers feel welcome — and as the current owners list the house, they think the next owners could return the spacious home to its original, hospitable roots.

Built in 1850 in Wilmot, New Hampshire, the home has maintained its period charm while still offering all the upgrades of 21st-century living.

Nestled on more than 8 acres of land, the 4,235 square foot home has six bedrooms, four-and-a-half baths and a perfect setup for a future B&B or Airbnb business. (more…)

The Isaac Heffron House, a two-story Victorian in the East End Historic District of Galveston, has seen a lot since it was built in 1890 — thanks in part to the occupants who called it home over the years.

Isaac Heffron immigrated to the U.S. from Wales and settled in Galveston in 1860. He worked on the docks, making his way eventually to a career in construction, winning bids with the city of Galveston for a railroad and trestle bridge that connected the city to LaPorte. (more…)

Have we got the million-dollar listing for you! This week we zeroed-in on Atlanta and found a Southern Living Georgia home that is gone-with-the-wind-fabulous, honey!

Nestled in the exquisite High Point community on the south side of Sandy Springs just north of Atlanta, you’ll enjoy a pristine 0.34-acre cul-de-sac lot, coupled by a generous 3,590-square-foot interior, and a stunning wrap-around front porch so you can twirl, twirl, twirl.

Come check out this week’s edition of “What Can I Get For a Million” at SecondShelters.com.

Craig Ellwood wasn’t always Craig Ellwood, but the Clarendon, Texas, native became renown under that moniker as he made a name as a premiere modernist architect. His homes, often considered works of art (and rightly so), are perfect blends of spare, midcentury German Bauhaus architecture and the more informal California sensibilities of the state he called home longer than the Lone Star State.

Born John Burke in 1922, his family left Texas and found themselves in Los Angeles by the mid-1930s. After joining the Army Air Corps in the forties, he, his brother, and two friends set up shop as contractors under the name Craig Ellwood. Not long after, Burke changed his name to Craig Ellwood, and began night classes in structural engineering.

He opened his own firm, and began to make a name for himself. Despite never having a license as an architect, he was a sought-after guest lecturer and continued to create residential and commercial masterpieces until he closed his shop in 1977 and moved to Italy. He died in 1992.

One of those masterpieces is The Smith House in Los Angeles. Built in 1958, it was restored this year under American Institute of Architects fellow (and former Ellwood associate) Jim Tyler’s guidance. It is now on the market, and we have the details on SecondShelters.com.

Fans of southern gothic novelist Anne Rice know that New Orleans is prime territory if you’re looking for settings from some of her most famous books. But one of her abodes (she’s had a few) in New Orleans is now up for sale, again.

Located at 3711 St. Charles in Uptown New Orleans, the mansion was sold by Rice to new owners in 2011 (the list price was $3.19 million).

It is said that one of the families from her fictional Mayfair series “lived” at this home,  which Rice bought while she was writing “Lasher.”

We have more about the house (including links and photos), here.

Sometimes we find great properties, and sometimes they are dropped in our laps — and this standalone condo in the planned community of Mueller is a latter instance.

Never heard of Mueller? Located about 11 miles from the Austin city center, the community is the best of both worlds — city services without the city taxes or the city ordinances (more on why that is key in the story). It is located on the 700-acre site that was vacated by the Robert Mueller Municipal Airport when it relocated to Austin in 1999.

Given its proximity to downtown Austin and the University of Texas campus, 4511 Graceful Lane #474 is the perfect spot for season-ticket holding Longhorn football (or basketball, or both, for that matter) fans who want a place they can relax on game weekends.

We have more details about Mueller and this great standalone condo over on SecondShelters.com.

When Robert Lee Warren built his Colonial Revival-Prairie School style mansion in 1897, Terrell, Texas, was about 24 years old, having taken root like so many towns in Texas did — along a railroad line.

Although settlers first arrived in the area in the 1840s, it was the Texas and Pacific Railway’s march across North Texas that attracted interest in the town.  C. C. Nash and John G. Moore bought the tracts and planned the town that would flourish during the heyday of rail travel, and Warren would come a couple dozen years later to build his mansion, complete with a special room in the master suite that allowed him to watch his farm wake up every morning, right after he woke up.

Now, after a massive renovation spanning three years, the home is on the market. We have details on SecondShelters.com.

It’s a home designed by a famed architect, and it is also potentially the keeper of secrets of Houston elite — and now the Davis Mansion (or the Kingston-Davis House, as it’s now called) is up for sale.

Depending on who you ask, Evalyn Davis was either romantically involved with oilman T.P. Lee, was a friend to Lee, or was romantically involved with Lee and he had something to do with the death of her husband (something he always denied). (more…)