Have you ever wondered why Texas cities are more liberal than outlying areas?  It’s not a Texas thing.

Large urban environments are typically more ideologically liberal around the globe. Like a blast zone, liberal ideals diminish the further away you get from an urban environment.  But why?  The clichés of vibrancy, higher average education, and these days, younger populations.  But research is beginning shed a slightly different light on the phenomenon.

In a nutshell, liberalism today can be equated with empathy. The regular immersion and interaction between the daily lives of diverse peoples makes it easier to empathize with the effects of policies and ideas on people you know. Conversely, the further people are from those affected by negative actions, the easier it is to accept them. Call it skin in the game.

From the media we select, to friends (sometimes family), to the very real estate we inhabit, humanity has built its own echo chambers (often referred to as “bubbles”) in recent decades.

As a nation we cared more about war when there was a draft that (most) everyone was subjected to. When it was your children or your neighbor who was conscripted, you paid more attention. Would the Vietnam protests have changed the course of that war without mandatory service? Would the U.S. still be in Iraq and Afghanistan were there a draft? Would we have gone at all?

I hear you asking what this has to do with real estate. Simple. The vibrancy brought about by urban environments is not only great at attracting good restaurants and sidewalk-littering scooters, but it’s also good at breeding empathy, which today unfortunately equates to liberalism. Unlike the faceless online world, real life is generally kinder when real people are face-to-face.

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We all know Californians are flocking to Texas, but have you ever heard of a political movement specifically bringing them our way?

On May 22, Conservative Move launched on social media and a conservative’s dream of finding like-minded neighbors was made: help relocate families out of liberal dens (usually on each coast) to conservative pockets across the heartland.

Conservative Move was started by Paul Chabot, a former US Congressional candidate from California, now living in McKinney. Paul is retired from law enforcement and runs a counter terrorism consulting firm while serving in the Navy Reserves at the rank of Commander. A frequent Fox News guest, he is married with four children. 

“My wife (Brenda) and I decided to leave California in January of this year,” he writes. “We wanted a better life for our four young children, and we found it in Texas. Our only regret was not doing it sooner. This “idea” was so simple – we just wanted to help families make the move like we did … and that’s where we can be of help to you.”

Sell your home, he urges fellow conservatives. Buy your new home. Live. Conservative Move is an initiative of Chabot Strategies, LLC – A Military Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business. “

Apparently Conservative Move really likes Collin County, Texas.  

“Collin County is home to some of America’s best cities, including: McKinney, Frisco, Plano, Allen and many more,” says the website. But as they expand operations, the movement will add other counties across America.  

It’s also home to some crazy, possibly corrupt politics.

Oh and Conservative Move has anointed their own real estate agent for Collin County: Derek Baker, “who has been involved in Conservative Republican politics for more than 25-years, serving Senator Phil Gramm, Congressman Hensarling, then Governor and now Vice President Mike Pence.”

Stay tuned for more on this.

BarPolitics-napkin

By Amanda Popken
Special Contributor

It’s only the fifth installment of Bar Politics, so if you have no idea what this is, you’re not that out of the loop. You’ll definitely want to check out this amateur roadshow this month if you’re at all interested in housing, development, real estate, and the gentrification-storm we’re preparing for in North Oak Cliff.

Hosted by Josh Kumlar, the event is formatted similarly to the Late Night Show or the Daily Show. Political news jokes, a skit or two, and interviews with special guests. And music, of course.

Once a month they pick a topic, pick a bar, and start talking smack. Josh is a recent SMU grad, a theatre major. His friends help him with the show’s shenanigans. The interviewed guests are local celebrities, knowledgeable on the issue at hand. As Josh describes it: (more…)