By Lydia Blair
Special Contributor 
 
There are hundreds of mobile apps specifically focusing on real estate. Most are aimed at potential home buyers and sellers. Apps like Realtor.com, RealScout, and Homesnap help consumers search for properties for sale. Other apps provide neighborhood and property data like RPR Mobile and AreaPulse. Updater is an app that helps track moving tasks.

Then there are apps aimed at helping Realtors with their business. Many agents and brokerages use BackAgent, Skyslope and similar transaction management apps to help stay organized. Docusign is a popular app that gets signatures from clients on the go. Staging apps like PlanOmatic and Hutch help with marketing a property. Roomscan lets agents measure and record floor plans. The list goes on.

And there are also apps provided by title companies. Most of these are aimed at helping Realtors determine closing costs for a particular property. The really good apps allow agents to run an estimated net sheet for their clients.

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James Bohan-Pitt and Clay Stapp launched HipPocket, an app that connected Realtors to off-MLS listings, in 2015. The company will close at the end of this month.

We got tipped off by a reader that HipPocket, the tech start-up brought to the market by pioneering broker Clay Stapp and his business partner, James Bohan-Pitt, will soon close. In a message to users and clients of the site, Stapp and Bohan-Pitt said that the company, which was launched give agents and brokers a different platform to market and ask for properties in high-demand markets.

“Unfortunately we will be closing HipPocket officially on August 31st 2017,” Stapp and Bohan-Pitt said in the message to users. “Even though the evolution of HipPocket into an intelligent collaboration platform was sound, we have been unable to secure new financing to build HipPocket 2.0 and our brokerage subscriptions have not reached a level that we can maintain the business long term.”

The platform, which was available in the Apple iTunes store, came on the market with a bang in May of 2015. Users that have any questions or concerns about the closure of the company have been asked to contact support@hippocket.com.

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Thanks to modern technology, the homebuying journey is immensely easier than it was 10 years ago.

With just a laptop, tablet, or smartphone, you can now browse listings, tour homes, apply for a mortgage, and even sign off on closing documents with just a few clicks and a matter of seconds. It’s pretty game-changing, to say the least.

Are you preparing to buy a home in the near future? Make sure these 10 handy apps are on your radar. They can make the process much easier (and more enjoyable)!

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ebby halliday app

Consumers, especially Millennials, are changing up their house-hunting strategies. More than ever, buyers are relying on smartphone apps to discover available properties and narrow down their searches before getting in touch with a real estate professional.

Ebby Halliday Realtors has been on the leading edge of technology in the North Texas real estate market since they introduced a searchable website in the 1990s. Many brokerages weren’t even online then.

They are again shaping the technology landscape in real estate with the Ebby Halliday Realtors app, offering a plethora of powerful features and user-friendly components.

“The Ebby app is a natural extension of our website, ebby.com, said Randall Graham, vice president and director of marketing for Ebby Halliday Realtors. “We are dedicated to meeting all of our clients’ needs by providing advanced interactive mapping for consumers on the go.”

The app is proof of their expertise in the area of technology, showing Ebby “gets” the needs of modern buyers, particularly Millennials.

“This innovative app provides information in a natural way starting with a map, not a menu,” said Graham. “Just a few of the functions available to Ebby app users on the go include the ability to immediately find open houses and newly listed properties, and it’s easy to perform detailed searches and to share properties of interest with friends or your Realtor.”

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millennials real estate

Millennials use their smart phones extensively in the homebuying process and use apps for research. Photo: Garry Knight

For years, millennials have largely been thought of as renters, not buyers, but that has changed. Millennials, born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s, now represent the largest group of homebuyers in the U.S. at 32 percent, taking over from Generation X, according to the 2015 National Association of Realtors (NAR) Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study, which evaluated the generational differences of recent home buyers and sellers.

This matters because the way millennials buy real estate is markedly more technology-driven than older generations, and Realtors need to adapt to their style if they want to keep up, says David Maez, Broker and Co-Owner at VIVO Realty.

“There’s lots of frustration among older agents in working with the millennials, but they’re not going away and agents need to learn to adapt,” Maez said. “It’s exciting because of all of the technology that’s available to us to make it easier to buy and sell properties. How people buy properties is going to continue to evolve on the technology level.”

millennials real estate

Take, for instance, the telephone. Many Realtors are used to speaking with clients, but millennials are much more into texting.

“With millennials, you have to communicate how they want to—they are big on texting and many don’t even answer their phones,” Maez said. “Some agents have had success using Facebook messaging because [their millennial clients] are not checking their email, either.”

The smartphone is key to a lot of the differences in millennial real estate patterns. More than half of them search for homes on their mobile phones and 26 percent of those buy a house they found that way, according to research from NAR.

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You’ve heard about Realocator from us before. It’s the new app that helps buyers connect with Realtors in real time via GPS. It’s like Uber for real estate, and it’s a concept that intrigues us!

If you’ve wanted to see Realocator in action, check out this spot on CW33’s News Fix featuring Vivo Realty Group co-founder David Maez as he demonstrates what his app can do to revolutionize the real estate industry, one showing at a time.

Have you downloaded the iOS app for Realocator yet? What did you think?

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Sometimes the best way to find your next home is just by driving or walking the block. You learn so much about a neighborhood that way, just by going up and down streets, looking at front yards and landscaping, seeing people walking down the sidewalks, hear noisy dogs and see traffic in real time. And sometimes, while driving a neighborhood, you come across a home that’s too good to pass up. Your first instinct might be to call the number on the sign, but that might mean you can’t tour a property for several hours, if not a day or more. What do you do if you want to check out a property right then and there?

That’s the problem that Realocator solves, says David Maez, Realocator co-founder and broker at Vivo Realty Group.

“This app will revolutionize the way buyers and agents connect.” Maez said. “Mobile buyers want on-demand showings, and that’s what this app does. Comparable to UBER, buyers can visually see the cars of available agents ready to show you a home on demand.”

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Jump for a video on how the app works:

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Millennials texting

Millennials use their smart phones extensively in the homebuying process and use apps for research. Photo: Garry Knight

For years, Millennials have largely been thought of as renters, not buyers, but that has changed. Millennials, born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s, now represent the largest group of homebuyers in the U.S. at 32 percent, taking over from Generation X, according to the 2015 National Association of Realtors (NAR) Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study released today, which evaluated the generational differences of recent home buyers and sellers.

This matters because the way Millennials buy real estate is markedly more technology-driven than older generations, and Realtors need to adapt to their style if they want to keep up, says David Maez, Broker and Co-Owner at VIVO Realty.

“There’s lots of frustration among older agents in working with the Millennials, but they’re not going away and agents need to learn to adapt,” Maez said. “It’s exciting because of all of the technology that’s available to us to make it easier to buy and sell properties. How people buy properties is going to continue to evolve on the technology level.”

NAR graph

Take, for instance, the telephone. Many Realtors are used to speaking with clients, but Millennials are much more into texting.

“With Millennials, you have to communicate how they want to—they are big on texting and many don’t even answer their phones,” Maez said. “Some agents have had success using Facebook messaging because [their Millennial clients] are not checking their email, either.”

The smartphone is key to a lot of the differences in Millennial real estate patterns. More than half of them search for homes on their mobile phones and 26 percent of those buy a house they found that way, according to research from NAR.

(more…)