On May 30, the City of Dallas made a pretty savvy auction sale of a city-owned lot, one of many across town, this one at 5639 Forest Lane which has been sitting idle for years, just east of the Dallas North Tollway.

The property failed to meet a minimum bid in January when (another) church wanted to buy it.

It’s kind of a sorry piece of property, history-wise, because the city bought it, probably paid too much for it, and then couldn’t do anything with it. The 150,702-square-foot, 3.45 acres are on the outskirts of Melshire Estates, where neighbors were bemoaning the chopping of a half-mile of trees along the Tollway by Oncor a few months back  — wonder how they feel about that now? Guess they don’t mind the house in foreclosure on Quincy one house in from Forest, though. 

11907 Quincy, listed for $448,000, is pending. Check out the potential, backs to Dallas North Tollway

(more…)

The big mistake that a lot of sellers make when updating a property for the market is taking it all too far. Sure, I love a good open floor plan, but can we admit that not all homes should have them?

A fantastic example of updating without sacrificing a home’s character is this adorable updated ranch in Melshire Estates. These homes have such great bones, fantastic lots, and family-friendly floor plans that it’s sad to see them remodeled into oblivion. Our Inwood National Bank home of the week, however, has benefited from updates that put a fresh face on this Melshire Estates ranch without gutting it of all character.

Following the ideal of “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” this listing from Mohammed Jaber and Michelle Hopson of Compass Dallas feels dreamy and bright without being sterile. 

(more…)

Melshire Estates Midcentury Modern

Janelle Alcantara lives and breathes modern architecture. When she spotted this Melshire Estates Midcentury Modern at 5546 Charlestown Drive, it was one of those honey-stop-the-car moments.

Alcantara is not just an architecture lover — she’s also a senior associate with David Griffin & Company Realtors. She sees a lot of homes, and she sees a lot of them get torn down that frankly should have been renovated. She started Galaxy Modern, an architecture-driven real estate service, to make modern architecture accessible and to preserve existing modern homes whenever possible.

This Melshire Estates Midcentury Modern is an exciting example of what can be done when you have vision. It was constructed in 1964 when a lot of architect-designed homes were springing up in the neighborhood. Remember, this was an era when cool was the watchword. The Rat Pack was making headlines, the Ford Mustang appeared on the scene, and Mary Quant brought us the miniskirt. I won’t tell you what the median house price was because you’d just cry.

Dallas has a number of homes from this era that are worthy of saving, but most investors see only the dirt value and scrape away to throw up a generic McModern. Fortunately for all of us, one of the investors Alcantara works with shares her sensibility and enthusiasm for architecturally cool properties.

When Alcantara saw this Melshire Estates Midcentury Modern, she knew what she wanted to do, assembled a crackerjack team, and got to work.

Matt Dimitri Karpenko is known for bringing these midcentury gems to life again,” Alcantara said. “But this is his crown jewel! The house was painstakingly and delicately deconstructed to preserve all that is magnificent about midcentury modern architecture, then slowly and carefully redesigned.”

Melshire Estates Midcentury Modern

Melshire Estates was voted by D Magazine as one of the Top 10 Neighborhoods in North Texas. It’s a beautiful area with large tree-lined streets, deep property setbacks and that sought-after walkability we all want.

(more…)

pitchesAs we’ve mentioned before, every week we solicit pitches for our various featured listing posts, including our weekly roundup of open houses.

You can tag us on Instagram, or even better, you can join our Facebook group, Getting the Dirt.  It’s a great place to virtually mingle with fellow professionals, ask questions, lend a hand, and, yes, pitch stories to CandysDirt.com writers. Not a Realtor? It’s a great place to get a first glimpse at some of the most recent listings all over North Texas, too.

Take, for instance, this week’s properties featured in our CandysDirt.com Open Houses of the Week. We have four incredible properties this week — consider it our usual three and a bonus house, if you will.

Want to see who made a successful pitch? (more…)

12417 Quincy lane

By now you have probably heard that about 100 trees will be chopped down in North Dallas, trees that line the Dallas North Tollway on the eastern side from Forest Lane north for about a half mile to Harvest Hill Road. All sorts of varieties, too, pines, live oaks — good trees. For 30 years these trees have created a nice buffer between the Dallas North Tollway and the backyards of the folks who live on Quincy Lane in Melshire Estates.

So why are we doing this?

The trees are going to be cut down by Oncor to replace old transmission towers with spotless new towers, because we are sucking so much energy. There is an increased demand for power in this city — one of the many side-effects of our gleeful growth. (And you want Amazon?) Robert Wilonsky over at the Dallas Morning News heard about the Quincy Lane tree-ectomy from homeowners on that little street whose western edge backs right up to the Dallas North Tollway. The trees, writes Robert, are on Oncor’s property, since they own an easement behind the homes, abutting the Tollway. 

The trees have to go because they will make it too dangerous for the electrical upgrade work, which might involve helicopters. They are on Oncor’s property, and state law says Oncor can cut down any tree it wants if it interferes with utility equipment.

“That line isn’t just about the customers on Quincy that like the trees on Oncor right of way,” said Oncor spokesman Geoff Bailey, who also serves as CEO Allen Nye’s chief of staff, “but the hundreds of thousands of customers those lines serve.”

Bailey said, yes, this is all very “unfortunate” and “we understand the passion about trees.” But he said that verdant buffer must go to make way for construction equipment, including, likely, helicopters. They are dangerous, too, he said, as they begin growing toward the power lines. 

Still, it seems pretty drastic. This home at 12417 Quincy abuts the tollway and will likely lose some of the canopy in the backyard.

(more…)

Splurge vs. Steal: Two Melshire Estates Houses | CandysDirt.com

You’ve got to love a neighborhood with the motto, “A community where neighbors are friends and friends are family.” 

That’s what you’ll find in Melshire Estates, a wonderful area inside the 635 loop, just east of the Dallas North Tollway. That’s where our Splurge vs. Steal houses are located today. One is high-end new construction (with a matching price tag) and the other, a complete renovation of a 1967 one-story. Which one is your favorite? 

 

(more…)