millennials real estate

Millennials use their smart phones extensively in the homebuying process and use apps for research. Photo: Garry Knight

For years, millennials have largely been thought of as renters, not buyers, but that has changed. Millennials, born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s, now represent the largest group of homebuyers in the U.S. at 32 percent, taking over from Generation X, according to the 2015 National Association of Realtors (NAR) Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study, which evaluated the generational differences of recent home buyers and sellers.

This matters because the way millennials buy real estate is markedly more technology-driven than older generations, and Realtors need to adapt to their style if they want to keep up, says David Maez, Broker and Co-Owner at VIVO Realty.

“There’s lots of frustration among older agents in working with the millennials, but they’re not going away and agents need to learn to adapt,” Maez said. “It’s exciting because of all of the technology that’s available to us to make it easier to buy and sell properties. How people buy properties is going to continue to evolve on the technology level.”

millennials real estate

Take, for instance, the telephone. Many Realtors are used to speaking with clients, but millennials are much more into texting.

“With millennials, you have to communicate how they want to—they are big on texting and many don’t even answer their phones,” Maez said. “Some agents have had success using Facebook messaging because [their millennial clients] are not checking their email, either.”

The smartphone is key to a lot of the differences in millennial real estate patterns. More than half of them search for homes on their mobile phones and 26 percent of those buy a house they found that way, according to research from NAR.

(more…)

Millennials texting

Millennials use their smart phones extensively in the homebuying process and use apps for research. Photo: Garry Knight

For years, Millennials have largely been thought of as renters, not buyers, but that has changed. Millennials, born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s, now represent the largest group of homebuyers in the U.S. at 32 percent, taking over from Generation X, according to the 2015 National Association of Realtors (NAR) Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study released today, which evaluated the generational differences of recent home buyers and sellers.

This matters because the way Millennials buy real estate is markedly more technology-driven than older generations, and Realtors need to adapt to their style if they want to keep up, says David Maez, Broker and Co-Owner at VIVO Realty.

“There’s lots of frustration among older agents in working with the Millennials, but they’re not going away and agents need to learn to adapt,” Maez said. “It’s exciting because of all of the technology that’s available to us to make it easier to buy and sell properties. How people buy properties is going to continue to evolve on the technology level.”

NAR graph

Take, for instance, the telephone. Many Realtors are used to speaking with clients, but Millennials are much more into texting.

“With Millennials, you have to communicate how they want to—they are big on texting and many don’t even answer their phones,” Maez said. “Some agents have had success using Facebook messaging because [their Millennial clients] are not checking their email, either.”

The smartphone is key to a lot of the differences in Millennial real estate patterns. More than half of them search for homes on their mobile phones and 26 percent of those buy a house they found that way, according to research from NAR.

(more…)

We’ve recently made the change to Facebook comments on our blogs, and we wanted to take a moment to explain why we decided to change the comment format, and how it works.

Commenters can now login via Facebook or Twitter — we are working on Google+, LinkedIn, and other social media accounts. When you opt for one of these social logins, your comments don’t have to be subject to editorial moderation before posting.

We don’t shy away from controversial topics here on CandysDirt.com, no sir, we do not. Once in awhile we hear from peeps who want to turn a legitimate House Porn analysis or  an intelligent discussion about the real estate issues our region faces into ad hominem attacks and ugly arguments behind the guise of Internet anonymity.

Over here at CandysDirt.com, we don’t like ugly

We’ve never cherry-picked comments on this blog. As a matter of fact, we’ve published several comments that even the comment’s author thought would be relegated to the circular file. You can’t be a blogger in this age if you don’t have both thick skin and the ability to laugh at yourself. Likewise, personal attacks, profanity, outright lies and libel are the only comments we’d filter out.

But we’re never willing to settle for just OK. We’re the region’s leading source of real estate insider news for a reason — we’re always striving for bigger and better. In an effort to elevate the discussion even further, we’re holding comments to the same level of accountability to which we hold ourselves. Quite simply, they are a guest in our home. We love having them here, we want to wine and dine ’em and hear everything they’ve got to say. Get it off your chest ’till those implants burst! But just don’t get ugly on us.

Like any transition,  it won’t be easy at first as we knock out the kinks. We’re also seeking a way for non-Facebookers to get in on the fun.

We have built something pretty special here and we are growing like a 6-year-old kid who tells his mom “my legs are hurting.” Our goal is to build an online media company that everyone who reads and shares CandysDirt.com can be proud of.

Disagree? Like the new Facebook comments? Well, comments are open!