collier

Houston businessman and Democrat Mike Collier filed at 1 p.m. Monday to run against incumbent Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (Photo courtesy Mike Collier).

Mike Collier knows that there are people that care deeply about whether Texas stays red, turns blue, or goes purple — but it’s not his chief goal.

“My aspiration is political competition,” he said on a drive from Houston to Dallas last week. “I just want to see the end of this one-party system.”

Collier filed today to run as a Democrat against incumbent Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and said he knows that running for a statewide seat as anything other than a Republican can be seen to some as a bit quixotic.

But is it really? The Houston businessman may have seemed like a long shot when he first announced he was considering a run several months ago, but recent successes this month in other GOP stronghold areas has made the whole prospect less far-fetched.

Collier said his platform’s foundation is in two intersecting areas — public education and property taxes. For an hour, CandysDirt.com engaged in a question and answer session with the candidate. Below are some of his responses. (more…)

Todd Staples at MetroTexThat’s Todd Staples, candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Texas with me, Rhonda Needham, Former TAR TREPAC Chair, and precious Vicki White, Keller Williams Elite. Todd sure made the agents feel great when he said “Realtors are the reason why Texas is doing so well!” After cautioning everyone on the headwinds facing Washington, he focused on the two most important things he worries about in Texas: our future water needs, and a skilled workforce. (Photo kindly taken by Marvin Jolly, Keller Williams Elite.)

Speaking of headwinds, I am sure you all have heard about the bankruptcy court’s decision in Detroit: “In a ruling that could reverberate far beyond Detroit, a federal judge held on Tuesday that this battered city could formally enter bankruptcy and asserted that Detroit’s obligation to pay pensions in full was not untouchable,” this from the New York Times. My favorite (shudder) part of the story is what Bruce Babiarz, a spokesman for the Detroit Police and Fire Retirement System, said:

“This is one of the strongest protected pension obligations in the country here in Michigan,” he said. “If this ruling is upheld, this is the canary in a coal mine for protected pension benefits across the country. They’re gone.”

Why do we care about Detroit when we are sitting happy in Dallas? Look for a big fight on pension protections across the country as municipalities find they cannot sustain support of police, fire, streets, education and crime fighting etc. and still support these pensions.

Todd Staples at MetroTexThat’s Todd Staples, candidate for Lieutenant Governor of Texas with me, Rhonda Needham, Former TAR TREPAC Chair, and precious Vicki White, Keller Williams Elite. Todd sure made the agents feel great when he said “Realtors are the reason why Texas is doing so well!” After cautioning everyone on the headwinds facing Washington, he focused on the two most important things he worries about in Texas: our future water needs, and a skilled workforce. (Photo kindly taken by Marvin Jolly, Keller Williams Elite.)

Speaking of headwinds, I am sure you all have heard about the bankruptcy court’s decision in Detroit: “In a ruling that could reverberate far beyond Detroit, a federal judge held on Tuesday that this battered city could formally enter bankruptcy and asserted that Detroit’s obligation to pay pensions in full was not untouchable,” this from the New York Times. My favorite (shudder) part of the story is what Bruce Babiarz, a spokesman for the Detroit Police and Fire Retirement System, said:

“This is one of the strongest protected pension obligations in the country here in Michigan,” he said. “If this ruling is upheld, this is the canary in a coal mine for protected pension benefits across the country. They’re gone.”

Why do we care about Detroit when we are sitting happy in Dallas? Look for a big fight on pension protections across the country as municipalities find they cannot sustain support of police, fire, streets, education and crime fighting etc. and still support these pensions.