This 7,154-square-foot Hillcrest Estates home of Dallas City Councilman Lee Kleinman and his wife, Dr. Lisa Umholtz, is going to auction with no minimum bid on Sept. 28 with Elite Auctions, and CandysDirt.com is offering you a chance to preview it tomorrow.

Join Candy’sDirt for an exclusive Open House event from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14 at 11322 E. Ricks Circle, Dallas. Scroll down to RSVP to see one of the greenest homes in Dallas.

“Hopeful buyers now have the chance to name-their-own-price at our upcoming, no reserve, auction at 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 28,” says Elite Marketing Director Alicia Chmielewski.

This could very well be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to own almost two acres of the most the most private, park-like setting in Dallas.

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Critic’s Choice Award: Magnolia Service Station – Not Really “Unbuilt”

Back in May, the day I.M. Pei died, the Dallas chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) held their annual awards for unbuilt projects along with a separate student design award. As I walked around the entries with our founder and publisher, Candy Evans, I began to notice that the buildings I liked most were almost always outside Dallas and Texas as a whole. You see, the awards are for Dallas-based design firms’ work, not necessarily projects in the Metroplex.

So yes, I could go on a riff about bland Dallas architecture, but you’ve heard that before. The “Aha!” moment was that Dallas-based architectural firms were capable of producing interesting work – it’s their Dallas-area clients that are to blame for lacking in imagination and fortitude. This means that my series “Why Can’t Dallas Have Nice Things” is a larger indictment of local developers than it is of local architects.

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Bosco 2

Milan, Italy’s award-winning Bosco Verticale homes. Magnificence not seen in Dallas architecture.

Shortly after the deadly March 4 Preston Place fire, I wrote about several options for redevelopment within current restrictions. To recap, Preston Place is within the Planned Development District 15 (PD-15) that is subject to its own development limitations, outside city zoning.

The PD-15 documents were most recently updated to reflect the added units for an unbuilt high-rise on the Preston Place plot in the 1970’s era. Today, it’s those additional 80 units that are available to any lot within PD-15 to increase density, so long as they do not exceed 52.4 “dwelling units” per acre.

After that column ran, one commenter said they’d heard the Preston Place owners were already discussing rebuilding. My answer was that sure, they may rebuild, but it won’t be brick-for-brick the same building. Opening that can of worms with 60 separate owners will result in change. “As long as we’re starting from scratch…” will be the opening of many conversations.

Also, several readers questioned what could happen if a developer went to the neighborhood and city to change the PD-15 documents for expanded growth…and was successful.

A lot.

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Symphony House IHOTW

Walking through Architect George C.T. Woo’s “Symphony House” in University Park is like reading a good book, and one you can’t judge by its cover. That’s on purpose. Woo likes a good surprise as much as anyone. So he created a subtle façade that does very little to prepare you for having your proverbial socks knocked off the moment you enter the front door.

3636 University

Woo is known for his work with I.M Pei on The Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. He lived in this home at 3636 University Boulevard while working with Pei on the project. He founded his architectural firm, George C.T. Woo & Partners, in Dallas in 1986. Woo also worked on the design of Dallas City Hall and The Lipscomb House in Cedar Hill. His residential and commercial projects span the globe.

You can imagine the detail and craftsmanship an architect puts into their own home—it’s off the charts.

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