It’s the most delicious holiday home tour every year, and we look forward to the eye candy (and regular candy) on display in Highland Park Village every year in the form of the eighth annual Gingerbread Stroll. This unique edible home tour features elaborate gingerbread houses created by Dallas pastry chefs that you can view and bid on starting today, Nov. 16, through Nov. 30.

Christine McKenny

All proceeds of the stroll will help support Community Partners of Dallas’ new facility which opens in 2019. Specifically, the Gingerbread Stroll will fund one of their night response visitation rooms, which provides a warm and loving place for children taken into protective care by Child Protective Services as they await their transition to their safe placement. The visitation rooms will look like small houses, so it is fitting that one be named after The Gingerbread Stroll. 

“It is so incredible, thanks to the pastry chefs and community sponsors, that The Gingerbread Stroll has increased in annual giving from $3,000 the first year in 2011, to over $31,000 last year,” says Allie Beth Allman agent and Gingerbread Stroll founder Christine McKenny. “I am hopeful we raise over $35,000 this year for the children served by Community Partners of Dallas.”

(more…)

French EclecticOur Monday Morning Millionaire is a beautiful French eclectic home at 4301 Edmondson Ave. only a block from Highland Park Village. This is an architectural style that has never gone out of style largely due to the fact it combines influences that strike a familiar chord, such as symmetry, while still allowing the freedom to experiment a bit, hence the eclectic aspect. (more…)

The sixth annual Gingerbread Stroll offers a chance to ogle and bid on delectable architecture sprinkled through Highland Park Village.

One of our absolute favorite holiday events starts tomorrow, and we could not be more thrilled! The sixth annual Gingerbread Stroll, where you can shop Highland Park Village and bid on beautiful works of confectionary architecture, runs through tomorrow, Nov. 17, until Friday, Dec. 1. This year’s gingerbread houses are crafted by 12 of Dallas’ best pastry chefs, while all proceeds from the even will go to the Clayton Dabney Foundation for Kids with Cancer.

“The Gingerbread Stroll has become a wonderful tradition during the most wonderful time of the year,” said Allie Beth Allman agent Christine McKenny, who founded the Gingerbread Stroll in 2011. “People of all ages gather with their family and friends to attend, and it’s always exciting to see how the chefs express themselves creatively. Everyone loves a gingerbread house!”

(more…)

 

IHOTW

With the fervor for tearing down classic homes in the Park Cities right now, it was refreshing to find our Inwood House of the Week, a charming University Park Tudor not only intact, but also lovingly restored. What was even more refreshing was sitting down with the talented woman that saw the potential in 4111 San Carlos Street, and hearing her story.

(more…)

 

4331-Edmondson-1-

Photos: Shoot2Sell

Have you ever longed for a storybook cottage, but with a clean modern interior? Well, we’ve found it!

This charming Highland Park Tudor at 4333 Edmondson — our Inwood National Bank Home of the Week — is a perfect example of how to move an adorable 1925 cottage into 2016 with style and grace.  (more…)

david stocker

The Sunnybrook Residence by architects David Stocker and Stephen Lohr of Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro. Photo: Nathan Schroder

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here). This column was originally posted on April 20. 

In Dallas, architect David Stocker, AIA, is well-known for his residential, commercial, and sacred spaces. He approaches his work theologically, he says, creating beauty in a broken world, one project at a time.

David Stocker

David Stocker, AIA

“I see beauty as largely objective—in a sense we are ‘hardwired’ to experience beauty,” Stocker said. “It is a common trait in our humanity. The creative process is really discovering, or in most cases re-discovering, these timeless patterns of what is known as beauty.”

He is a principal at Uptown-based Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects, a firm he co-founded with Mark Hoesterey and Enrique Montenegro almost 11 years ago. As the firm profile states, “We consider ourselves ordinary people who are extraordinarily good at our work. We care deeply about our craft and who it affects, and it is our desire to be always conscious of our design principles and core values, regardless of project type, scope, style, or location.”

Their portfolio on Houzz is a testament to the beauty they create. In fact, they’ve received the “Best of Houzz” design and service awards 2014-2015, and a design award this year. We sat down with Stocker and asked him about his background, philosophy, favorite projects, and more.

CandysDirt: You grew up in Central Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago. How did that influence you?

David Stocker: It gave me great access, at an early age, to the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Mies van der Rohe, and others and began my love of architecture. I began my move towards Texas by going to architecture school at the University of Arkansas. I was fortunate that E. Fay Jones was active at the school and professor at the time. I loved the school and the program (my daughter is attending now). I graduated in 1984 and decided to make Texas my home and begin my career at HKS [Architects].

(more…)

david stocker

The Sunnybrook Residence by architects David Stocker and Stephen Lohr of Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro. Photo: Nathan Schroder

In our ongoing series, Interview with an Architect, we speak with leading voices in the North Texas architecture community and learn about their work, development issues in our community, and good design practices and principals (you can read the last one here).

In Dallas, architect David Stocker, AIA, is well-known for his residential, commercial, and sacred spaces. He approaches his work theologically, he says, creating beauty in a broken world, one project at a time.

David Stocker

David Stocker, AIA

“I see beauty as largely objective—in a sense we are ‘hardwired’ to experience beauty,” Stocker said. “It is a common trait in our humanity. The creative process is really discovering, or in most cases re-discovering, these timeless patterns of what is known as beauty.”

He is a principal at Uptown-based Stocker Hoesterey Montenegro Architects, a firm he co-founded with Mark Hoesterey and Enrique Montenegro almost 11 years ago. As the firm profile states, “We consider ourselves ordinary people who are extraordinarily good at our work. We care deeply about our craft and who it affects, and it is our desire to be always conscious of our design principles and core values, regardless of project type, scope, style, or location.”

Their portfolio on Houzz is a testament to the beauty they create. In fact, they’ve received the “Best of Houzz” design and service awards 2014-2015, and a design award this year. We sat down with Stocker and asked him about his background, philosophy, favorite projects, and more.

CandysDirt: You grew up in Central Illinois between St. Louis and Chicago. How did that influence you?

David Stocker: It gave me great access, at an early age, to the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Mies van der Rohe, and others and began my love of architecture. I began my move towards Texas by going to architecture school at the University of Arkansas. I was fortunate that E. Fay Jones was active at the school and professor at the time. I loved the school and the program (my daughter is attending now). I graduated in 1984 and decided to make Texas my home and begin my career at HKS [Architects].

(more…)

Dallas cougars

Prepare: It’s not just bobcats and coyotes in North Texas. We’ve got a large population of cougars, too.

Everyone is abuzz with the coyote and bobcat sightings all over town, from Plano to East Dallas. These are the new most feared words in North Texas:

“You need to know that a coyote has been spotted out here tonight.”

Several house pets have been killed, and homeowners are alarmed that the coyotes are becoming, well, BOLDER:

In an academic paper for Purdue University, (Robert Timm, a University of California wildlife specialist), outlined several warning behaviors that sound like what we’ve been seeing in East Dallas in the last couple months: an increase in coyotes seen on the streets or in yards at night, coyotes killing pets and especially daytime appearances of coyotes.

Coyotes schmoyotes. Now there’s a different, more fearsome animal you’ll see much more of in North Texas: Cougars.

They are independent, strong, beautiful women of a certain age with definite luxe real estate leanings—full marble master baths with book-matched marble not only on the floors and counters, but up the wall to keep those claws sharp, and a keen (green) eye for style: it’s celadon, dammit, not teal.

Kitchen with dual sinks are a must for visiting South American pumas. Handscraped hardwoods are her floor of choice (doesn’t show scratches), and she will not sniff a house without ensuite baths and at least three powder rooms (gotta check on the sleek looks). 

Most out on the prowl are harmless, though they are crepuscular. A college student jogging in Preston Hollow after dusk was recently picked up by a PH cougar driving a black S-Class who insisted he get in her car, and let her take him home to protect him from the wild coyotes roaming the streets. He didn’t know who to fear more. He succumbed, and she dropped him at his door without a scratch.

Others, have not been so lucky, especially with the mid-cities cougars who have exhibited irrational, aggressive behaviors, such as trapping 18-year-olds.

We’ve talked to several concerned businesses and homeowners alike around DFW to find out where these cougars are most likely to be spotted, usually crouching, and gauging just how dangerous they are. (Only 20 people in North America have been killed by cougars between 1890 and 2011, including six in California.) Seeing them in the wild—like at the recently sold Waggoner Ranch—is such a thrill! We have no doubt some will soon be seen at the Crespi Estate/Walnut Place and also down at the former residence of Margaret and Trammell Crow. (Margaret is watching, you cats!)

Truth be told: their coats are to die for.

Just be careful if you’re a 20-something man with big guns. These cougars are bold, confident, devour real estate, and are dressed to kill.

(more…)