HGTV

Local military veterans Andy and Ashley Williams helmed HGTV’s Flip or Flop Fort Worth — but did their show return this year? (Photo courtesy HGTV)

This time last year, and it looked like Texas would be plenty represented on HGTV — but with the end of Fixer Upper last season, the number of Texas-based shows on the network dropped to exactly none.

Last season, we saw (in addition to Fixer Upper) the debut of Flip or Flop Fort Worth. Also, the sister network DIY Network offered Texas Flip N’ Move(more…)

Texas

Andy and Ashley Williams will become the latest Texas-based home renovation stars when their “Flip or Flop Fort Worth” debuts next week on HGTV (Photo courtesy HGTV).

From the final season of “Fixer Upper” to the freshman season of “Flip or Flop Fort Worth,” Texas is home to several home improvement or design shows this fall. HGTV, the DIY Network, and even Great American Country, locals are ready for their close-ups.

As shows begin to roll out their season debuts, we thought we’d take a look at the ones who have been blessed with a full season run, and a couple that are still out there fighting the good fight to get picked up. (more…)

HGTV

The father-daughter team of Doug Broadbent and Paige Poupart own the building and design firm The Masters Dallas. With their new show, Renovation Gap, airing Saturday, they may just be HGTV’s newest Texas team. (Photo courtesy Paige Poupart)

Paige Poupart was already busy — between owning the building and design firm The Masters Dallas with her father, Doug Broadbent, and motherhood, her plate was pretty full. But her days just might get a little fuller now that HGTV has come calling.

Poupart and Broadbent will get a chance to make a case to HGTV viewers Saturday when the pilot for their show, Renovation Gap, airs at 1 p.m. Central.

To say she’s excited is probably an understatement. The father-daughter team working together in the contracting business attracted the home improvement channel, but Poupart says that she and her father have been doing this for years and that she learned the renovation business practically from birth.

“So my dad has been a general contractor for ’35 years,’” she said. “This is such a used phrase (usually when correcting someone who is doing something wrong on the job site) that we actually have an inside joke about it.”

“I grew up renovating our homes with him and then selling them and moving to the next one,” she explained. “Many of these were in New England and historic homes, so I’ve really grown to love the historic character and sensibilities.”

One might think that just living in a state of constant renovation would teach a child enough, but the pair began working together on the jobsites pretty early, too.

“I started working on his jobsites with him probably about around age 10, he offered to pay me to keep the job sites clean, and I was an ambitious girl so I worked after school on his jobsites until he realized I could do more than just pick up track and vacuum sawdust,” she explained.

“He started to offer me more important construction jobs and I told him I wouldn’t work by the hour any longer so he had to pay me by the job.”

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Grand Designs Australia - Waterfront Home

Grand Designs Australia – Waterfront Home

Grand Designs,” “Restoration Home,” “Restoration Man,” “Double Your House for Half the Money,” “My Dream Derelict Home,” and “The House that £100K Built” are all TV programs you’ve likely not heard of or watched … and you should … and you can. That’s because thanks to YouTube, we can enjoy these UK and Australian programs too.

The fare on HGTV and DIY is fare-ly repetitive. If the market is roaring, we see house flipping, second home buying, and fire-stoking, get-rich-quick real estate stories. When the market shrinks, it reverts to cheap renovation, cheap decorating tips and blanding your house for a quick sale; awaiting the market to awaken.

Throughout it all, there is “House Hunters,” featuring couples who should never have married and “House Hunters International,” which is full of Americans lamenting itsy-bitsy refrigerators in far off lands.

Of course, it’s been fairly well reported that most of the shows are in some way fake. “House Hunters” is more about guessing which home the buyer has already purchased. Renovation shows always act shocked about “catastrophes” (revealed seconds before the commercial break) that a blind house inspector would have caught. Finally, there are the inane budget talks … you know what I mean …

Agent: “What’s your budget for your studio condo in Des Moines?”
Buyer: “$1 million.”
Agent: “Welllll, that’s a tight budget, it’s going to be very difficult. You may have to compromise.”

Regardless of the program, it’s all repetitive fake drama wrapped up with a bow in 21 or 43 minutes (subtracting commercials). This isn’t to say I don’t watch HGTV. I just watch it for information while trying my best to avoid the theater – the best way to do this is with a DVR and liberal use of fast-forward (and not just through the commercials).

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Josh and Hannah were brave enough to re-do their master suite on the DIY network's "Renovation Realities" show.

Josh and Hannah Ramsey were brave enough to re-do their master suite on the DIY network’s “Renovation Realities” show. They’ve decided that, while they love their East Kessler home, it’s time for them to simplify.

Josh and Hannah Ramsey have loved North Oak Cliff since they bought their first home just off of W. 8th Street in 2009. That was back when the Oak Cliff “Oh…” was almost a reflex when the Ramseys told their friends where they lived. It didn’t bother Josh and Hannah, though, as they felt right at home from the moment they moved in.

“Our house was a block from Bolsa, and we fell in love with the neighborhood, the amazing food, and the entrepreneurs making this place great,” Josh said. “We preemptively sold our home for a job relocation that fell through and then bought a home in Lake Highlands. It never felt like home, so we started house hunting and found a giant gem. It was way too big, but we saw the beauty here.”

Josh, a corporate director for Hilton Worldwide, and Hannah, a trauma nurse at Parkland, bought a 1946 neoclassical and set to work making it a place to raise a family. The home had already had a history of entertaining kids, as the previous owners of 15 years raised all six of their children there. Before that, Josh noted, the home housed nuns that volunteered at Methodist Dallas Medical Center.

“When marathon training a few years back, I remember running by this house thinking, ‘I’d sure love to live there one day,’ ” Josh mused. “We knew it was well loved and couldn’t believe the charm.”

But the home needed a lot of work.

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