Gracious, upscale living has a new address in the heart of Dallas, with easy access to the Katy Trail, the Arts District, high-end shopping, and some of the city’s finest restaurants. 

Live above it all at the Residences at the Stoneleigh with dramatic views of downtown, a lush greenbelt, sunrises, and sunsets from your balcony at ​2300 Wolf St. The 22-story building is nestled between historic Turtle Creek and the energy of Uptown and offers a rare opportunity to totally customize a luxury high-rise unit. 

Floorplans range from 2,400 square feet to over 4,200 square feet of shell space — buyers can even combine units to create a home up to 15,000 square feet.

“It’s the perfect way to have total control over the design/build process and each shell will be hand-crafted by one Dallas’ finest homebuilders, TriArc Construction and Sharif & Munir,” said Stoneleigh Sales and Marketing Manger Donna Smith. “We’ve already sold over 60 percent of available units to buyers who understand what a one-of-a-kind property this is in Dallas.” 

Also available: turn-key, designer-finished homes with all of the details already in place in one of four floorplans. Buyers can work with their preferred interior designer or a recommended designer to select the perfect furnishings, too. Move-in ready homes mean the Residences at the Stoneleigh lifestyle can become a reality all the sooner. 

Now, I can’t go any further without mentioning the fabulous amenities! Jump to read all about them. 

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Jordan Group 7

I can see jealousy at the Crescent Court

The most pleasantly surprising moments at last evening’s event at The Jordan apartments were not when the the wine flowed out of bottles named “Jordan,” or when we oohed and ahhed over the cove-lit ceilings in the penthouse units. No, it was when we spied residents using the outdoor barbecues.  I’ve lived in many an apartment with communal barbecues where you could get grill marks on your steak without even firing it up … just laying it on the rusty unused grates gave you all the “sear” marks you’d want.

But last night, between tours of The Jordan’s luscious units, I saw a steady stream of residents making their way to the communal barbecues to fix dinner. A little skewered shrimp here, a little salmon there, a big ‘ol steak. It sounds like a small thing, but it hints at a community that feels at home.

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Limited Edition Top 1

In response to a question at last night’s meeting for the Hood and Dickason high-rise (Turtle Creek Haus), Masterplan representative Karl Crawley lobbed out that The Limited Edition at 2505 Turtle Creek was being redesigned. I was there to catch that ball.

Turns out he’s correct.  Just as Turtle Creek Gardens agrees to a $43 million sale to JLL, its neighbor is having a rethink.  I’ve hinted for months that Dallas is over-saturated with luxury high-rises. What’s built is half empty. Bleu Ciel has started building out the pool deck on level 7, because 6 levels are now complete of the 33 story building. If it appeared that construction was “down under”, it was: they were working on the private garages within the underground, 5 level parking garage, which are exclusive to Bleu Ciel and the Azure.

Note: previously we reported that construction had stopped on the project, which was incorrect. It was not, however, visible.

Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s quietly stopped marketing the Limited Edition in February. It’s been reported that while owners Great Gulf are still very committed to Dallas, they’re reevaluating their concept.

This review obviously has everything to do with pricing.  In my opinion, this ultimately translates into smaller units with less swanky interiors that may, in the long run, be better for the area and the Dallas marketplace. Expect a relaunch in the autumn, perhaps in conjunction with more details on the rental building planned across the street that’s yet to be enrobed in even a construction fence.

I wonder if Limited Edition’s falter gave Bleu Ciel sales a boost or if the Stoneleigh and Museum Tower benefitted? Hmmm…

As always, stay tuned.

Winner Slug v1

Remember:  Do you have an HOA story to tell?  A little high-rise history? Realtors, want to feature a listing in need of renovation or one that’s complete with flying colors?  How about hosting a Candy’s Dirt Staff Meeting?  Shoot Jon an email.  Marriage proposals accepted (they’re legal)!  sharewithjon@candysdirt.com

The Abandoned Vida

The Abandoned Vida

In December, I spent a month writing about Hawaii real estate. Several of the articles showcased new and planned high-rises in the Kaka’ako area of Honolulu that were almost exclusively targeting foreign investment and wealthy local buyers wanting to trade their nest for a high-rise perch. You may also recall that many of these buildings were selling out in days.

The big Kahuna in the area is Howard Hughes’ 10-plus-year development called Ward Village covering 60 acres. They are not alone. One high-rise that hadn’t broken ground is called Vida … well, “was” would be the more accurate term as of last Friday. Developers cancelled the project after “only” selling approximately 40 percent of the 262 units (priced from $1 million) despite being on sale for 18 months. In Hawaii real estate if you’re scrabbling for sales after 18 months, something’s wrong.

In Dallas, a 40 percent pre-sale before the first shovel of dirt was moved would be occasion to rejoice, but markets are different.

Vida's High-End Finishes

Vida’s High-End Finishes

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HOA dues are a mixed bag when you consider what they include.

HOA dues are a mixed bag when you consider what they include.

Buying into a multi-tenant dwelling will likely add another wrinkle to your finances: HOA dues. Yes, there are some multi-tenant townhome developments that have no HOA dues at all. While on the surface that sounds marvy, in reality, it’s a bit flying-without-a-net for me. With no cash reserve, any shared issue or expense has to be agreed on and hastily paid for.

As far as I know, except for The Beverly, Dallas high rises base their dues on unit square footage per month. For example, a 1,000-square-foot unit in a building charging 60¢ per-square-foot, per month, would equate to $600 per month. The Beverly has a set rate for every unit, regardless of its size. Some buildings, like Park Towers, increase the rate based on unit location – the higher the floor, the higher the rate (the closer to God?).

The monthly “nut” for a single-family home will include a mortgage (or not), utilities, insurance and property taxes. It may also include gym memberships and maintenance costs for landscaping and swimming pools.

A multi-tenant home will have some of those expenses bundled into their HOA dues. The nut needed for a condo will include a mortgage (or not), HOA dues and property taxes. Condo HOA dues may also include utilities, insurance and maintenance.

Personally, I’m a big fan of life automation. What bills I have are charged to a single credit card that I pay electronically. Similarly, HOA dues rollup my individual bills for water, sewer, gas, electric, cable TV, pool maintenance, insurance, landscaping and even contribute to a reserve savings account for unexpected issues. When I think back on all the checks I used to have to write…

But not everyone thinks as I do (more’s the pity, eh?). I pointed out in a previous post that many high-rise newbies will chafe at the thought of HOA dues. I sure did.

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