Renaissance - Poston Map

In January, the lots located at 3407 and 3409 North Hall Street were reported in DCAD to have been sold to TDRE Lee Park LLC. The actual owner is currently masked behind the LLC with a local address of 4100 Spring Valley Road, Suite 310, in Dallas. However, TDRE Lee Park is a Houston registered LLC, set up by Houston attorney John W. Wood who acts as the registered agent for over 200 LLCs largely located in Houston. Wood is a pretty successful guy who lives in the tony Tanglewood section of Houston – meaning the Poston plots are unlikely to have been purchased by a Mom and Pop looking to restore the property.

TDRE Lee Park LLC is one of three TDRE-named LLCs all registered by Wood and include TDRE Hood LLC that was registered on the same day as TDRE Lee Park LLC (Dec. 22, 2015) and TDRE Investments LLC registered on April 2, 2015. Like all LLCs managed by Wood, they all share the same Houston address (which is meaningless as it’s no more than a mail drop). None of the three list any officers and I suspect they are owned by the same person/organization.

TDRE Hood LLC may hint at a property acquisition on Hood Street, but there is currently nothing in DCAD about any TDRE ownership outside the former Poston properties on Hall Street. Pure speculation, but … there is certainly room along Hood Street to tear down redevelop any number of aging low-rises in this VERY HOT area of Turtle Creek.

In reviewing zoning, lots 3407 and 3409 North Hall account for a sliver less than a half-acre. Given a residential MF-2 listing within the PD-193 area, this limits the parcel to 60 units per acre unless it’s designated commercial, which DCAD says it is. In this case, commercial-designated parcels within PD-193 can accommodate 160 units per acre. However, setback requirements have scuttled deals in the past.

Stay tuned to CandysDirt.com for more as it becomes known.

Remember: Do you have an HOA story to tell? A little high-rise history? Realtors, want to feature a listing in need of renovation or one that’s complete with flying colors? How about hosting a Candy’s Dirt Staff Meeting? Shoot Jon an email. Marriage proposals accepted (they’re legal)! sharewithjon@candysdirt.com

claridge condos for sale

The place to be at sunset

This is part last in a four-part series. Read parts onetwo, and three, and join us at our CandysDirt staff meeting here on March 22!

Capping off our Four R’s series is this endcap double-unit penthouse at the Claridge. For those just tuning in, four Claridge units, each featured in a previous posting, will play host to the anniversary Staff Meeting event for Candysdirt.com on March 22nd.

Unit 18CF is marketed by Judy Pittman, this 4,810 square foot, two bedroom, 3.5 bath is on the market for $2.7 million. Frankly, about all I’d need to move-in and die happy would be fresh undies and a toothbrush.

The views? Take your pick. You have 180 degrees to choose from. About the only thing not visible is the Turtle Creek and Lemmon Avenue intersection to the north. Fireworks? You’ll see them all framed in every room of the home. Need a little extra cash? Surely some radio or TV station would pay for live weather and traffic updates visible from this home.

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Claridge condos turtle creek

This is part three in a four-part series. Read parts one and two, and check back tomorrow for part four!

The Jefferson’s were all about “movin’ on up,” and that’s exactly where we’re going with this third in our quad-fecta of Claridge condos that will set the stage for the March 22nd anniversary of the Candysdirt.com Staff Meeting event.

This 2,876 square foot home is a full three bedroom, 3.5 bathrooms listed with Ebby’s Penny Rivenbark for $1.395 million. Located on the 15th floor, we’re eight-to-ten floors higher than our first two homes. Add to that a more north-facing view from the opposite side of the building and the views obviously change dramatically. Instead of a distant city there’s more in-your-face drama from neighboring buildings along with winding Turtle Creek views. And how many can boast a view of one of Dallas’ few Frank Lloyd Wright buildings, the Kalita Humphreys theater?

I’m calling this unit a “refresh” because while your wallpaper steamer may be working overtime, the fundamentals are very nice. (Although Rivenbark told me one of the first prospective buyers loved the wallpaper, and you might too!) There’s only really one minor project for me (and you’ll faint when I tell you).

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claridge dallas condos

This is part two in a four-part series. Read the first one here, and check back tomorrow for part three.

As part of our quad-fecta of Claridge listings celebrating the anniversary of our Staff Meeting events on March 22nd, we have unit 5D, another listing from Allie Beth Allman’s Sue Krider. This unit moves down the hall from last column’s 7E offering similar straight-on Turtle Creek and downtown Dallas views (albeit two floors lower).

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View 7E

This is part one in a four-part series. Check back tomorrow for part two!

Every time I enter The Claridge, I like it more. It may be a round-y 1980’s building surrounded by Lemmon Avenue, but the interior spaces are large, well thought out, and the views are wonderful. That’s why, for our March 22 anniversary CandysDirt.com Staff Meeting event, we’ll be celebrating a quad-fecta of homes at The Claridge!

As they say, there’ll be something for everyone (with a $1 million-plus budget). I’m calling these units the four R’s: “Rehabilitate,” “Remodel,” “Refresh,” and “Rejoice.”

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1550 N State

Chicago’s 1550 N. State Parkway; $12,000 and a time machine.

I recently returned from a trip to Chicago where I walked around burning off calories and looking at the high-rises of my childhood dreams. Chicago had a golden age of residential high- and mid-rise construction from the 1880s to the crash of 1929. Some were co-ops but most were apartments billed as mansions in the air. Units were enormous— 5,000-plus square feet was not unusual, many were multi-floor, and most had tremendous views of Lake Michigan. Their exteriors are an array of styles from Tudor to Beaux Arts to Deco.

Unfortunately, the interiors are generally not conducive to today’s living. Servants’ quarters, miniscule bathrooms and closets, and kitchens at opposite ends from the living area do not fit today’s lifestyles or open-plan living – and reconfiguring is difficult. My fantasy building is at 1550 N. State Parkway built in 1911. Each of its 11 8,000-square-foot floors was a single apartment. The living area is 100 linear feet with fireplaces at each end. It’s the Nebraska Furniture Mart of apartments and had a rent in the 1920s of $12,000 a year – four times the salary of the average citizen.

But enough Chicago trivia, let’s move forward a century to Dallas of the 1980s, the era of round edges and inappropriate use of mirrors.   Inexplicably, of the nine residential high-rises built during the decade, the only building name that didn’t begin with “The” was Park Plaza. You may be thinking I’m forgetting Latour, but “La tour” is French for “The Tower.” Ha!

I have no idea why residential high-rise construction was on hiatus for almost a decade and a half – I didn’t live here then, so it’s not my fault!  But come back it did, and when it did, it seemed a touch cautionary. Of the nine, three had under 50 units and only four had more than 100 units – just one with over 150.

Also noticeably missing from this era are the centralized utilities found in Dallas’ older high-rises. Billing was now based solely on individual unit usage with system maintenance also transferred from building to unit owner. HOA dues per square foot can be lower in these buildings, but not seemingly enough to make up for the utility shift.

Fear not, acres of popcorn ceilings remain!

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View Main

One of the main drivers for purchasing in a high-rise is the view. A buyer walks in “Oooo-ing and cooo-ing” as they’re transfixed by panoramic views. Other minor problems sometimes fall away, subsumed by the cliché “million-dollar” view.

Buyers must remember that while they’re sold on the view, their purchase actually stopped at the glass. The view, like that tiny free bottle of water from the sales office, doesn’t last forever. Even back in 535 BCE, Heraclitus knew, “No man ever steps in the same river twice.”

Dallas’ building boom is only speeding up the process of high-rises springing up to block (and themselves only borrow) those million-dollar views. If a permanent view is important to you, careful evaluation and broken rose-colored glasses are required.

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3831 Turtle Creek Blvd PH23C a

Though they’ve been living in their 23rd-floor penthouse at The Warrington only six months, it didn’t take Stephen and Jane Lerer too long to realize that they were totally and completely in love with their immense, luxurious, and freshly renovated unit inside this Turtle Creek highrise.



“I really loved the structure of it, the design,” said Jane. “Light comes in from three directions — north, east, and west — and we get the sunrise and sunset, and every room has these floor-to-ceiling windows.”

She’s so smitten that she’s opening her three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bath, 4,100-square-foot home to the Turtle Creek Tour of Homes on April 12. The tour, which benefits the Turtle Creek Association, will feature a beautiful historic Tudor at 4011 Turtle Creek and five more luxurious units at some of the most sought-after buildings in the neighborhood. The tour runs from 1 to 5 p.m., with an invitation-only afterparty from 6 to 8. Tickets are $50 for Turtle Creek Association members, and $60 for non-members. You can purchase tickets on the website, or you can stay tuned to CandysDirt.com for your chance to win a pair of passes.

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