Allie Beth Allman

The most amazing story ran on WFAA-TV Wednesday night by Shelly Slater on our treasured Allie Beth Allman and her personal secret: Allie Beth has battled dyslexia all her life.

But it sure hasn’t stopped her.

She is an icon in Dallas Real Estate, buying and selling homes to top movers and shakers including the biggest sale in Dallas, to George and Laura Bush on Daria Drive when they left the White House and returned to Dallas.

(Hmmm. Who broke that story?)

We have profiled Allie Beth Allman, of course, who once actually worked for WFAA-TV, always focusing on her dynamic real estate career. I had heard about her dyslexia, but she has now come forward publicly because she has teamed up with the Barbara Bush Foundation for Literacy.

The sweetest moment in this WFAA-TV produced piece: how Allie Beth’s husband Pierce reads to her:

“I’ll flip through and if there is something about a client, a former client, or potential client I will cut that,” said Pierce Allman during a morning debrief.

Allman reads to his wife, Allie Beth, for good reason.

“He knows what I can’t do but he doesn’t dwell on it,” Allie Beth said.

In fact, having people read to her is how Allie Beth made it through TCU and her Real Estate exam, which she had to take three times. (more…)

Barbara Corcoran

There are a lot of great stories in the real estate industry, but none are quite as compelling as “Shark Tank” star Barbara Corcoran‘s. The New York real estate mogul came from humble beginnings, building up her empire with just a $1,000 loan and an incredible amount of hustle.

And we could not be more thrilled about seeing Corcoran at the Champions School of Real Estate Keynote 2016. The May 10 event will host an inspiring address from Corcoran at the Plano Centre, gathering more than 1,200 real estate professionals and influencers all in one space.

After Corcoran’s presentation, Champions School of Real Estate CEO and founder Rita Santamaria will host a lively Q&A with this titan of our industry. It’s truly a can’t miss event!

 

“We are thrilled to present Barbara Corcoran as our featured speaker for this year’s keynote event,” said Kimberly Dydalewicz, president of Champions School of Real Estate. “As part of our commitment to providing the real estate community with educational opportunities of the highest caliber, we know that bringing Barbara Corcoran to share her personal and professional journey from ‘Rags to Riches,’ will educate, inspire resonate with our Dallas-Fort Worth real estate communities.”

Tickets are available at a rate of $65 per person or $480 for a group of 8. To register or learn more about Champions School of Real Estate’s Keynote 2016 visit http://www.championsschool.com/keynote/dallas.php.

Dave pm branding 3

See those beautiful new white and very bright yard signs dotting the lawns of North Dallas, Preston Hollow, Park Cities, Lakewood, Uptown and Kessler Park? They are the new look of Dave Perry-Miller (& Associates) Real Estate. Today is the unveiling of Dave’s brand new re-branding courtesy of the Richards Group.

“Just like you need to update your house and refresh it from time to time, we decided to update our look here at Dave Perry-Miller,” says the name brand himself, Dave Perry-Miller. “We really wanted something more streamlined and crisp, very much in keeping with what our homeowners are wanting.” (more…)

Is Dallas getting to be a city of more renters than home-owners? And why is it harder to find homes to rent than to buy? A friend,  a high-profile Dallas photographer, emailed me this very question. When it comes to finding real estate, there are more sites than stars out there where you can search for real estate. Of course, it didn’t use to be this way. Once upon a time before the Internet, the real estate market was a totally different puppy. You relied on Realtors to check out giant MLS books of listings, all updated weekly. There’s the key: the Realtors guarded the information, they controlled it. 

Then the world changed.

Now you have Realtor.com, Zillow, Trulia, Redfin, Movoto, Active Rain, HotPads, hundreds of sites out there not to mention brokers and individual agents’ sites so you can shop for a home to buy in multiple places.

But when it comes to leasing, where are the rental sites? For some reason, they just don’t seem as thorough.

My suspicion is that because buying and selling homes is more lucrative for Realtors, many don’t want to mess with rentals. In California, for example, most Realtors will not even touch a rental transaction.

What really gave a kick in the pants to getting real estate listings on line, and what “gently urged” most Realtors to share listing information by a  virtual office Web site, was a 2008 settlement between the Justice Department and the National Association of Realtors. DOJ forced brokerages to share listing data with their rivals, including Internet-based firms that offer rebates or other discounts to buyers willing to do most of the legwork to find a home. DOJ was concerned that agents had a monopoly on sales information. DOJ is also the reason why you are required to register when you are searching on agents’ websites — that was part of the settlement. Of course, that is also capture for the agents.

In most parts of the country, and here in Dallas, brokers share information about properties through the MLS (multiple listing service). It’s a database of property sales histories operated by a group (or groups) on behalf of its members. In Texas, of course, we do not have to disclose sales prices. New York City remains an MLS hold-out: though Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx each have a multiple listing service, many agents in New York City are not members. Rather, they participate in the Real Estate Board of New York, called R.L.S. To rent, you contract with a leasing broker who’s fee is usually one month’s rent, which is pretty standard and also negotiable.

But back to our Dallas family of four seeking a nice house to lease in the Richardson School District: does anyone have a three bedroom, two and a half bath, beautiful home with a leafy back yard and room for kiddos to grow up?