homeless

Dallas ISD, who is partnering with Promise House, CitySquare and Social Venture Partners Dallas under the program After8toEducate to bring a first-of-its-kind service to address the needs of vulnerable students and other unsheltered city youth, celebrated the opening of the drop-in center at the Fannie C. Harris Youth Center Tuesday. But cold temperatures are bringing immediate needs (Photo courtesy After8toEducate).

As Ashley Warren stood shivering outside the Fannie C. Harris Youth Center Tuesday as dignitaries and partners cut the ribbon on the first phase of the drop-in center for Dallas ISD’s homeless youth, she realized something — her office was about to get even busier than usual.

Marshall is the manager of the district’s homeless education program, and when the mercury drops, she begins to worry about the thousands of students who lack shelter.

“I went to ribbon cutting for our new drop-in center today, and it was so cold,” she told me last night. “I realized that we are in for a bad winter and our phone is going to start to ring off the hook for various items.”

The district has about 4,000 students each year that are considered homeless — but most experts feel that number is likely much higher, since some won’t admit they’re homeless. (more…)

Protect your plants with the coming cold snaps with these tips from the Dallas Arboretum.

From the Dallas Arboretum

With freezing weather approaching, it is important to take precautions to ensure your plants are protected from extreme weather conditions.  Following a few simple steps prescribed by Dave Forehand, Dallas Arboretum vice president of gardens, will enable your plants to survive the sometimes-harsh North Texas cold spells. 

(more…)

So, I’m dealing with a chest cold here in East Dallas, and I really am wishing I had a fireplace by which I could warm up my tootsies. This has lead me on a search for amazing fireplaces in Dallas. Of course, we don’t deal with a ton of cold weather, but having a good fireplace can help give your furnace a break when we get freezing weather like last night and tonight.

Here are a few homes with some amazing fireplaces that I would definitely enjoy, all from homes priced under a million. Know a listing that has a beautiful mantle? Leave it in the comments!

1) 7126 Oakbluff

7126 Oak Bluff Fireplace

This home is incredible, but the fireplace is just a work of art with that stacked stone!

2)2001 N. Buckner

2001 Buckner

You all know the “underground house.” You may not know that it has an incredible fireplace, too!

3) 4339 Northcrest

4339 Northcrest

Talk about drama! Wood and metal on this double-sided fireplace will melt even the harshest critic of modern design.

HLC Frost Cloth

With “Icemaggedon” hitting soon, and the cold weather officially upon us, it’s time to keep an eye out on protecting your plants from the freezing temperatures. We’ve asked noted landscape architect, Harold Leidner, to provide some insight and suggestions for protecting those plants from the cold temperatures.

Freeze Protection Methods

One of the essential freeze protection items that we install on all our projects is a rain and freeze sensor on the irrigation system. This sensor (which can be hard wired or wireless) activates once the temperature drops below 40 degrees and prevents the irrigation system from operating in cold temperatures and adding any water to the plants that may cause damage.

HLC Temperature detectorAnother primary method of protection those plans is to use a frost protection fabric or freeze cloth over the top of the plants. This fabric, which can usually be found at any nursery or home improvement store, will help wick water away from the plants, provide an additional layer of protection and help prevent any ice from forming on the plants.

We typically use short wood stakes to ‘tent’ the frost cloth above the plants and also use landscape pins to anchor the fabric down so windy conditions don’t blow it away. If the cold temps sneak up on you and you’re in a pinch, a good old bed sheet will work as well. (Just don’t use the nice ones!)

Plants That Need Protection

Most plant varieties sold at nurseries and used in the Dallas area will be cold hardy for the climate. However, there are certain varieties of plants, usually tropicals, that will need a little extra protection.

Palms are one of the primary plants that we take care to protect from cold temperatures. Sago palms (Cycas revoluta) certainly are fragile to the cold and will need to be covered. Windmill Palms (Trachycarpus fortunei) are generally cold hardy, but the trunks can be wrapped with a blanket or frost protection cloth. Other plants that are susceptible to freezing are Oleander (Nerium oleander), Variegated Ginger (Alpina vittata) and the vine Fig Ivy (Ficus pumila). All of which could benefit from the protection of a freeze cloth.

We find annuals to be optional but some of our clients prefer that we also cover their newly planted winter seasonal color like Pansies and Cyclamen. Any containers or potted plants that are not connected to irrigation or drainage, we would suggest simply moving them into the garage to weather the frigid night time temperatures.

Miss those 100 degree days yet?

Need help preparing for freezing weather? Contact the talented staff at Harold Leidner Landscape Architects to guide you.

HLC Freeze Protection

With the Thanksgiving holiday hitting this week and the cold weather officially upon us, it’s time to keep an eye out on protecting your plants from the freezing temperatures. We’ve asked noted landscape architect, Harold Leidner, to provide some insight and suggestions for protecting those plants from the cold temperatures.

Freeze Protection Methods

One of the essential freeze protection items that we install on all our projects is a rain and freeze sensor on the irrigation system. This sensor (which can be hard wired or wireless) activates once the temperature drops below 40 degrees and prevents the irrigation system from operating in cold temperatures and adding any water to the plants that may cause damage.

HLC Temperature detector

 

Another primary method of protection those plans is to use a frost protection fabric or freeze cloth over the top of the plants. This fabric, which can usually be found at any nursery or home improvement store, will help wick water away from the plants, provide an additional layer of protection and help prevent any ice from forming on the plants.

We typically use short wood stakes to ‘tent’ the frost cloth above the plants and also use landscape pins to anchor the fabric down so windy conditions don’t blow it away. If the cold temps sneak up on you and you’re in a pinch, a good old bed sheet will work as well. (Just don’t use the nice ones!)

Plants That Need Protection

Most plant varieties sold at nurseries and used in the Dallas area will be cold hardy for the climate. However, there are certain varieties of plants, usually tropicals, that will need a little extra protection.

Palms are one of the primary plants that we take care to protect from cold temperatures. Sago palms (Cycas revoluta) certainly are fragile to the cold and will need to be covered. Windmill Palms (Trachycarpus fortunei) are generally cold hardy, but the trunks can be wrapped with a blanket or frost protection cloth. Other plants that are susceptible to freezing are Oleander (Nerium oleander), Variegated Ginger (Alpina vittata) and the vine Fig Ivy (Ficus pumila). All of which could benefit from the protection of a freeze cloth.

We find annuals to be optional but some of our clients prefer that we also cover their newly planted winter seasonal color like Pansies and Cyclamen. Any containers or potted plants that are not connected to irrigation or drainage, we would suggest simply moving them into the garage to weather the frigid night time temperatures.

Miss those 100 degree days yet?

Need help preparing for freezing weather? Contact the talented staff at Harold Leidner Landscape Architects to guide you.

Transparency in Real Estate, lesson #1.

Oh boy, I know he meant well, but Deion Sanders, who apparently had a lot of water damage to his Frisco, Texas home last week — a home on the market for $21 million –— posted this on his Twitter account. Of course ALL¬† home damage has to be divulged to any prospective buyer, but this just kind of really puts it out there.

Let me ask you this, who did not have any trouble with frozen water pipes last week? I built our house so all faucets are on interior walls, but our outdoor shower, which was turned off, has sprung a leak. I heard at Supper Club on Saturday that one friend was in his attic de-frosting their Rinaldi hot water heater. If anything, we can deduce two things I’ll be covering more this week:

-We need to beef up our building standards in Texas to accommodate future cold weather because it seems our climate is changing.

-The Azure condo would have been a much more pleasant place to be during the freeze. Friends who live at The Ritz did not have frozen water pipes or no heat. The Ritz has a back-up generator. They also had ice-free driveways and a warm garage. Hungry? Call Fearings. Folks at The Azure had a short bundled-up walk to The Stoneleigh to sup at Bolla.

Colder it gets in Dallas, the better and brighter condo living looks!