church

Finegold Alexander Architects turned this 18th-century church into a 30-unit condo development that marries the modern and the historic (photo courtesy Finegold Alexander Architects).

It all started in a Facebook group: Someone asked about the status of the now-dormant Oak Cliff United Methodist Church in a group devoted to Dallas history.

“Anybody know what’s going on with this place?” the group member asked. “I’ve been driving by it daily on the way to my school and just watching it deteriorate daily. So sad. They can’t tear it down, thankfully.”

Several people commented on deterioration, including one person who shared photos of broken windows and an interior that is exposed to the elements. Another noted that it appeared as if the building was in the process of being boarded up. (more…)

2700 Fairmount church

It never ceases to amaze me what a difference a few miles make in real estate values. Here is a church in Uptown for sale that NO ONE wants to tear down!

Last week, we told you about the George Dahl-designed church at the corner of Kiest and Polk at 1010 West Kiest Blvd., diagonally across from the Barbara Jordan Elementary School, and across from the Kiest Polk Shopping Village, and how a new owner wants to scrape it to make way for a shopping center. Or something. We’ll have more on that soon.

That Oak Cliff Church building is architecturally, historically and culturally significant. It was designed by renowned Dallas architect George Dahl in 1953 as Church of the Master, Evangelical and Reformed Church serving a congregation of German/Swiss Immigrants of Oak Cliff who came to Texas by way of Galveston. While it’s not in the best of shape currently, I don’t agree with those who claim it’s not worth keeping.

Churches can have second, third or fourth lives. Here is a church at 27oo Fairmount in the heart of Uptown that has a significantly higher price tag — $8.4 million — yes, you read that correctly — and has been used as a creative office space. It could once again be an office space, company headquarters, home, multi-family living, my creative juices were overflowing last week as I toured it. It, too, is an architecturally significant historical church designed by Herbert Miller Greene (architect of the very first Dallas News building in 1897, the downtown Neiman Marcus and other local landmarks) and his partner James P. Hubbell. It was completed in 1910 when commissioned as Westminster Presbyterian Church. The Beaux Arts structure has been carefully preserved and creatively renovated into tasteful and eclectic office space suitable for a variety of uses.

Well, except when they were going a little cray cray with blue paint back in 2014. Remember? But look at her now!

Fairmount-and-Mahan

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